Kawasaki Versys Forum banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I looked at the OEM Auxillary lights and couldn't see parting with all that $ C for something I could make for a fraction of the price.Also,I thought their system was over-engineered,not like Kawi engineering in performance which I really admire for efficiency.So I looked at some other bike OEM aux.light designs(images) and found a simple solution from BMW I think.Which is odd as they are famous for over-engineering!I got a couple of feet of aluminium flat bar,bent it into a U bracket.Underneath the front fairing is a section of the front frame,tube metal going across.I secured the aluminium flat bar U bracket to the tube frame section using 2 ground wire clamps from Home Depot.The ones electricians use to secure a ground wire to a plumbing pipe,they have a serrated "grip" for traction on a pipe.I bought a couple of 12 Volt 18 Watt LEDs,take your pick.Look for a spot light throw,a flood is more wide and not as concise for distance.My experience now is that they are all made in China despite what online vendors might imply.
At first I put a simple on/off switch but it was way to bright for incoming traffic.So I changed it to a simple on/on toggle switch.Only the hot wire goes through the switch,just like house wiring.I learned how to dim LEDs from youtube.The low power setting is achieved by using a resistor,somewhere around 300 ohms if I recall.Maybe different because there are two lights,I cant remember what I ended up using.I went to the local electronics supply store with a light and he tried some resistor settings for me.Experiment with different Ohms.You just loop that hot wire back and splice it into the other switch side full power feed down the line to the lights.Up switch full power,down switch dimmed power through the resistor.The resistors are very cheap.If you want lower brightness you use a resistor with less Ohms.You get more heat the more you resist the current so if the resistor is too hot to the touch get one with a higher Watts rating,they are bigger for heat dissipation but lots of room inside the fairing.But low current draw LED is way cooler than incandescent lights,no worries.Low power setting are the running lights.I wired off the bikes auxillary circuit,just like the OEM.
I used a toggle switch that takes a waterproof boot over it for obvious reasons.Couldnt find a decent handlebar mounted solution,where I put the switch works,I don't reach for the highs often.If a car cuts me off he gets the auxillary and LED headlights on full,they want to get out of there pronto!Everything was inexpensive,how much you want to spend on lights is up to you.Cree is the standard in N. America I believe..
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,159 Posts
very nice :) i did the same thing (i think total price was $12 shipped) but i mounted them to the front forks so they point where the wheel points so i can aim them at animals when they are on the side of the road, and better line of ride light
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: rsherman

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
I tried something similar. The pair I bought did not come with any extra wiring or switches, but look exactly the same. Had to send them back, as one light was defective. The ones I ordered were bigger than expected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I have a set of lights like those. They were very inexpensive ($20--25). They help some at night, but are not great. They definitely make me more visible in the daytime. Have had them about 2 years with no problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I had the Auxbeam version, a little better in quality but the size made me get rit of them
Mounted on the crashbar they looked huge and added some width to the bike which is allready a bit to much to turn the bike on my backlawn trough the gardendoor.
Lightwise, meh not that spectactular.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,427 Posts
My experience has been you need to spend more than a few dollars but not a large amount either, to get a good quality light that works. Typically $60-$120 for a pair. I also found I needed to purchase motorcycle model specific mounts for the lights which can cost as much as the lights. The mounts made the installation look professional and protect the lights in a tip over by virtue of where they locate them. Mounts are made by Denali, Kawasaki or SW-Motech. I bought the cheap LED lights from ebay before giving them away. I ended up with a pair purchased off of ali express that are round CNC aluminum with 4 CREE LEDs per unit and output 3500lm each. They turn night into day. You may even find you only need one. I don't see the point in spending 3-4x the amount for brand name lights from Denali or similar brand name manufacturers. Your mileage may vary.

Flood beam patterns (wide beam) are for lighting the bed of a pickup or deck of a boat. A spot beam pattern (narrow beam) works better illuminating at a distance.

LED aux lights because they use minimal power, can be wired directly to the high beam bulb circuit to minimize switching, alternatively you can use a $2 relay.

~1200lm is the light output from a single H7 bulb
~3500lm is the light output from a single high quality aux light
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
Those lights are going to be great for blinding yourself with. They are a very short range flood light. As such, they will only illuminate close to you and will ruin your night vision. You won't be able to see much if anything past those lights. That may work for you if you want to mount them up high (headlight level or above) and have them shining down for navigating single track at night. They will be useless or even dangerous on the street, and hazardous at highway speeds.

I have a similar pair of lights that are 'spot' pattern, which still have too much spill close in. They are currently mounted on my engine guards and aimed outwards to illuminate the sides of the road where the suicidal night critters are lying in wait. I'm spending time this weekend trying to locate a higher position to mount the lights, and probably fabricating brackets to do so. The turn signal mounts are one consideration.

As far as wiring is concerned, I use the high beam as the trigger for the relay, but have installed a small fuse block behind the left tank trim panel for power distribution. I don't like adding loads to existing circuits, rather I prefer adding additional circuits. Slightly more complicated, but I have yet to have any sort of electrical failure in 6 years / 100,000 km (62,000 miles). Not even a blown fuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,256 Posts
Regarding budget led lights, the only negative that I have heard , other than perhaps lacking quality, is fairly high amp draw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
My experience has been you need to spend more than a few dollars but not a large amount either, to get a good quality light that works. Typically $60-$120 for a pair. I also found I needed to purchase motorcycle model specific mounts for the lights which can cost as much as the lights. The mounts made the installation look professional and protect the lights in a tip over by virtue of where they locate them. Mounts are made by Denali, Kawasaki or SW-Motech. I bought the cheap LED lights from ebay before giving them away. I ended up with a pair purchased off of ali express that are round CNC aluminum with 4 CREE LEDs per unit and output 3500lm each. They turn night into day. You may even find you only need one. I don't see the point in spending 3-4x the amount for brand name lights from Denali or similar brand name manufacturers. Your mileage may vary.

Flood beam patterns (wide beam) are for lighting the bed of a pickup or deck of a boat. A spot beam pattern (narrow beam) works better illuminating at a distance.

LED aux lights because they use minimal power, can be wired directly to the high beam bulb circuit to minimize switching, alternatively you can use a $2 relay.

~1200lm is the light output from a single H7 bulb
~3500lm is the light output from a single high quality aux light
Thanks everyone. Yeah, I think if I got the spotlight version would be better than flood. $60 wouldn't be too bad. After reading the reviews of these one big negative is they aren't very waterproof. Though for that price I wouldn't care if they only lasted a year. Prob good to get a quality mount at least.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,140 Posts
...Mounts are made by Denali, Kawasaki or SW-Motech....
I made-up my own mounts for the Denali DMs I put onto my '15 650, by welding a piece onto the "spacer" for the front-lower crash-bar mounts from my SW-Motech crash-bars. [I 'lost' my pics of the INSTALL w/ the Photobucket debacle!]

You can get an idea of what I did from this pic.

 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
I made-up my own mounts for the Denali DMs I put onto my '15 650, by welding a piece onto the "spacer" for the front-lower crash-bar mounts from my SW-Motech crash-bars. [I 'lost' my pics of the INSTALL w/ the Photobucket debacle!]
Very cool. I do have access to a welder. hmmm.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,140 Posts
Very cool. I do have access to a welder. hmmm.
What I did was just take a small piece of flat steel, 'massage' it w/ a hammer so it had a bit of a "rounding" at one end, drilled a suitable hole for the Denali's mount in the OTHER end, then welded it to the roughly 1" long, round spacer (on the SW-Motech crash bars), then 'rattle-can' it black.

It is held by the bolt thru the spacer and the nut on the Denali from moving - once I set everything the way I wanted, then torqued those two to HOLD tight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
I ran the ones you bought. They are mediocre at best, but they actually work fairly well as cornering lights (pointed up and out). Issue I had was with the brackets. The brackets were **** and sheared apart within 5000 miles. FWIW they aren't designed for high vibration environments like the VERSYS.

If you like the style and output, move up to a JW speaker product and you will be very very impressed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
If you're looking to see further down the road, don't get those.
Those lights are going to be great for blinding yourself with. They are a very short range flood light. As such, they will only illuminate close to you and will ruin your night vision. .....
I agree with this sentiment. I tried some cheap LED driving lights a few years ago and encountered the same thing. At first it felt like "wow these add a light of light!" but really the light is too close to the bike, doesn't help to see stuff farther out, and actually is probably detrimental because having the ground so close to you lit up so bright reduces your long range vision.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
I agree with this sentiment. I tried some cheap LED driving lights a few years ago and encountered the same thing. At first it felt like "wow these add a light of light!" but really the light is too close to the bike, doesn't help to see stuff farther out, and actually is probably detrimental because having the ground so close to you lit up so bright reduces your long range vision.
Is this true for the spot version also? I posted flood but probably would opt for the spot.

I ran the ones you bought. They are mediocre at best, but they actually work fairly well as cornering lights (pointed up and out). Issue I had was with the brackets. The brackets were **** and sheared apart within 5000 miles. FWIW they aren't designed for high vibration environments like the VERSYS.

If you like the style and output, move up to a JW speaker product and you will be very very impressed.
I will look for JW too, thanks! Sounds like I should def avoid the brackets.

What I did was just take a small piece of flat steel, 'massage' it w/ a hammer so it had a bit of a "rounding" at one end, drilled a suitable hole for the Denali's mount in the OTHER end, then welded it to the roughly 1" long, round spacer (on the SW-Motech crash bars), then 'rattle-can' it black.

It is held by the bolt thru the spacer and the nut on the Denali from moving - once I set everything the way I wanted, then torqued those two to HOLD tight.
Thanks Fast Eddie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
I bought a set of these to mount my Auxbeam lights. They DID NOT FIT as there just wasn't enough room betwee the crash bars and engine, etc. to fit them onto the bike.


I ended up going to home depot and buying two Simpson concrete form angles and a couple of u-bolts:



I cut the form angles in half, drilled out a couple of holes, and mounted them to the crash bars. Then painted them black and attached the lights. They have not moved a single bit since I installed them. Total cost for the mounts was about $15 :)

I don't do a lot of back country night time driving. In the city, the Auxbeam spot/floods provide a lot of light to the sides and pretty far down the road. As others have said, I suspect that riding in complete darkness with the lights on might impact my downfield vision a bit.

I can take pics of how they look on the bars if anyone is interested.

For the on/off switch, mine came with double sided tape and I mounted it on the back side (inside) of my left handguard. It is very easy to reach out with my index finger and flip the lights on/off.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
I cut the form angles in half, drilled out a couple of holes, and mounted them to the crash bars. Then painted them black and attached the lights. They have not moved a single bit since I installed them. Total cost for the mounts was about $15 :)

I can take pics of how they look on the bars if anyone is interested.

For the on/off switch, mine came with double sided tape and I mounted it on the back side (inside) of my left handguard. It is very easy to reach out with my index finger and flip the lights on/off.
Great idea...yeah, I'd like to see the photos. I did use a U bolt mount for my heated grip control. They are solid.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top