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Discussion Starter #1
Stock tires are shot at 5500 miles, about to pull the trigger on some Shinko 705's. I'm pretty poor this summer because of childcare costs, looking to save cash whenever I can. I do all my other maintenance myself, rear axle has spindles, just wondering if I pull the tires and have the new rubber mounted somewhere if it's worth trying to do the rest myself? Anyone have an idea how much the shop charges?

I've got all the "normal" tools, not really looking to buy specialty stuff right now, again with the slim pickings this summer.

I'm totally familiar with car wheel changes, brakes, etc. Just never done a bike...and like I said no front spindles but I'm sure I can work something out.
 

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Stock tires are shot at 5500 miles, about to pull the trigger on some Shinko 705's. I'm pretty poor this summer because of childcare costs, looking to save cash whenever I can. I do all my other maintenance myself, rear axle has spindles, just wondering if I pull the tires and have the new rubber mounted somewhere if it's worth trying to do the rest myself? Anyone have an idea how much the shop charges?

I've got all the "normal" tools, not really looking to buy specialty stuff right now, again with the slim pickings this summer.

I'm totally familiar with car wheel changes, brakes, etc. Just never done a bike...and like I said no front spindles but I'm sure I can work something out.
I can change my own tire, have done it many times over the years. I no longer do it. I pull my wheels, take the wheels to a local shop 15 minutes away, wait about 30 minutes while shopping for other necessities and chatting with like minded folks while my new tires get mounted. I usually pay about 40 bucks or so and it is well worth it for me. Pulling the wheels off is very simple and no special tools needed..Taking the tire off the wheel you would want some good tire tools.. Oh and its typical good after deflating to leave in the hot sun for a bit to get good and pliable.. My experience anyway.. before taking the tire off the rim if you choose to do it yourself.
 

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Sounds like you need to call some shops and get quotes.
I have done the complete change, have pulled the wheels and had tires mounted, and have ridden in and had the full job done.
Choices were made based on time, but it definitely cost more with each increment.

Many shops charge a different fee based on whether you buy the tires from them, or bring your own.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sorry if I wasn't clear, I will NOT mount them myself, I'd pull them and have them mounted then replace them. At this point time is of little concern if there is savings to be had, I can do my chain tension and stuff then.
 

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You're all better men than I am, Gunga Din! Changed the tires ONCE on my Bandit 1200 - eventually succeeded but it was a bear and took me all weekend! And just to add insult to injury, I got axle grease on the rear tire and went down 50 feet into the test ride :O (yes, entirely my stupid fault - damage only to pride)

However pulling wheels is easy. Haul them to the shop in the car. Grab a coffee while they install (can't remember the fee but it seemed reasonable, and cheaper if you buy tires from them), and WAY faster than I can do it!

Good luck whatever you decide.
Rob in KC
'14 Versys 650
 

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I've done the last 3 or 4 myself... Closest shop is 25 miles and they are usually a busy enough to where I have to drop them off and pick up later... so its less frustrating to do it myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks all. Service manual necessary or is it pretty intuitive? I haven't even looked. I do chain tension myself regularly, though.
 

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Thanks all. Service manual necessary or is it pretty intuitive? I haven't even looked. I do chain tension myself regularly, though.
If you adjust your chain, your 1/2 way there. Simply get the wheel in the air and bike stabilized. loosen adjusters enough that it will ride off the rear sprocket By dislodging it from a few teeth and spinning rear wheel., take nut off the axle, pull axle out, remove chain rest of the way off, and your good to go, only takes a few minutes.. Extremely easy
 

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After paying to have my first tire changed I bit the bullet and purchased a decent tire changer (Cycle Hill & No-Mar bar).
Just under $400 or so but it has paid for itself probably twice over now.

Careful with the torque on the front caliper mounts, I twisted one bolt - and I was using a torque wrench (not appropriate for the 25ft-lbs
range of torque how ever, so I added another wrench to my toolbox).

I will add - leaving the tires waiting to be mounted - in the sun - helps more than you can imagine.
It's the difference between a 2 minute sweat-less mount and a 30 minute struggle.
 

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After paying to have my first tire changed I bit the bullet and purchased a decent tire changer (Cycle Hill & No-Mar bar).
Just under $400 or so but it has paid for itself probably twice over now.

Careful with the torque on the front caliper mounts, I twisted one bolt - and I was using a torque wrench (not appropriate for the 25ft-lbs
range of torque how ever, so I added another wrench to my toolbox).

I will add - leaving the tires waiting to be mounted - in the sun - helps more than you can imagine.
It's the difference between a 2 minute sweat-less mount and a 30 minute struggle.
I found that after I bit the bullet & bought the tools that friends were happy to supply me with pizza while they watched me swap tires. The lube that I got with the NOMAR bar was priceless.
 

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Not worth it to me. The shop where i go can sell me the tires cheaper than i can get them and get them faster also. What i save on the tires pays for having one tire being mounted and balanced. So i just take the bike and wait for them to knock it out. I make an appointment so no extra waiting.
 

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I changed out the tires on my '16 recently. The tools to do the whole job yourself properly but economically won't pay off until you do a couple of changes yourself. But with your basic tools you should be fine to take off the wheels yourself, and you'll definitely save money.

The rear wheel comes off easily, and you don't have to mess with the chain tension adjusters. A 1x4 or 2x4 under the tire before you pull the axle is handy, and especially when putting the wheel back on you'll want something to lever it back up to height so the axle slides in easily. Ditto the front wheel.

You'll need a torque wrench suitable for the wheel nuts, but also one with much a lower adjustment range for the brake caliper mounting bolts. If you've got those already plus the hex bits and sockets you're good to go.

The factory maintenance manuals are available free online in pdf format. The sequence and torques are all in there. The job was really pretty easy to do and if you save $40 per wheel yourself I think it is well worth your effort.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Perfect, thanks everyone. I'll go digging for the service manuals.

I have torque wrenche(s), I have sockets for all the larger nuts too.
 

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Not worth it to me. The shop where i go can sell me the tires cheaper than i can get them and get them faster also. What i save on the tires pays for having one tire being mounted and balanced. So i just take the bike and wait for them to knock it out. I make an appointment so no extra waiting.
But just think about all the informative videos you could produce if you did all the work yourself. :grin2:

I'm surprised you are not recording the tech changing the tires while narrating. >:)
 

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My shop = $45 if you just bring the bike in and $25 if you bring only the wheel in (this is per tire of course). For me, the do it yourself is not worth it-and we even have the most days of intense sun to soften the tires before manipulating them. Also, I have none of the needed tools right now.
 

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the shinko tire`s have a very stiff side wall , it is difficult to get the side wall below the lip of the rim to spoon them on
you can purchase the little yellow spacers to hold the side wall down below the lip of the rim, this help`s a lot
look at the no mar web site for these
 

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But just think about all the informative videos you could produce if you did all the work yourself. :grin2:

I'm surprised you are not recording the tech changing the tires while narrating. >:)

Watching someone else work is too much like work to me so I'll just sit in the lounge sipping a soda...:grin2:
 

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I like the Bead Breaker Tools he used....

 
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