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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In my haste to put a chain on my bike when I got it and needed one, I never did find out the tensile strength of the DID VX2 gold street pro, and it's stretching at about 8k miles. Ebay is the only one selling it I could immediately see (flag), so I am going to replace it with more due diligence this time.

Hayabusa forums talk about EK chains ($200 top chain for ours) are better than RK, but the x value EK chain for our 114 link, is about $80 to $102. So now, the best steel sprockets are needed, if the EK feedback is true.

EK street chains have a 2 year unlimited mile warranty (About Us), and one mild Hayabusa rider claimed he got up to 19k miles and before it started to stretch mildly.

Please post tensile strength and warranty with chain alternatives, as well as stock oem size sprockets: top quality and value priced hopefully

Thanks!:grin2:

NOTE: what got me looking at the chain, was hearing a little grinding which I think was the tight chain clearance on the muffler. If the oem chain came with a non-x ring chain, then this could be a problem since the xring is wider (!). How has anyone dealt with the tight chain to muffler clearance issue? That could be a chain-eater until rectified somehow. Thanks again!
 

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In my haste to put a chain on my bike when I got it and needed one, I never did find out the tensile strength of the DID VX2 gold street pro, and it's stretching at about 8k miles. Ebay is the only one selling it I could immediately see (flag), so I am going to replace it with more due diligence this time.

Hayabusa forums talk about EK chains ($200 top chain for ours) are better than RK, but the x value EK chain for our 114 link, is about $80 to $102. So now, the best steel sprockets are needed, if the EK feedback is true.

EK street chains have a 2 year unlimited mile warranty (About Us), and one mild Hayabusa rider claimed he got up to 19k miles and before it started to stretch mildly.

Please post tensile strength and warranty with chain alternatives, as well as stock oem size sprockets: top quality and value priced hopefully

Thanks!:grin2:

NOTE: what got me looking at the chain, was hearing a little grinding which I think was the tight chain clearance on the muffler. If the oem chain came with a non-x ring chain, then this could be a problem since the xring is wider (!). How has anyone dealt with the tight chain to muffler clearance issue? That could be a chain-eater until rectified somehow. Thanks again!
It has nothing to do with the tensile strength of the steel. Chains don't "stretch." Their rubber gaskets simply wear out (compress) which causes their length to increase over time.

DID are fine chains, I've used many of them over the years. Adjust your chain, it'll be fine.
 

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Motomummy has good prices on chain/sprocket combos. I'm no where needing to replace my V's chain. On my gsxr, I've been using the RK 520 GXW with good results. Track only, so it gets a work out!

For longer lasting on the street the EK looks like a good option.
 

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It has nothing to do with the tensile strength of the steel. Chains don't "stretch." Their rubber gaskets simply wear out (compress) which causes their length to increase over time.

DID are fine chains, I've used many of them over the years. Adjust your chain, it'll be fine.
Um... no

the chain links consist of outer and inner side plates held together by pins.
There are rollers over these pins that allow the links to rotate when going around the sprockets.

Chains with O or X or Z rubber rings have grease between the pins and rollers. The rubber rings sit between the side plates and the rollers, are just there to hold the grease in and crap out.

You can have compressed and missing rubber ring and it will NOT lengthen the chain.
It is the wearing of the pins and roller diameters from dirt and dust, as well as the thinning and deepening of the sprocket teeth that loosen the chain on a bike and why you have to adjust them.
Some chains might also stretch in the side plates - different quality in steel.
 

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Um... no

the chain links consist of outer and inner side plates held together by pins.
There are rollers over these pins that allow the links to rotate when going around the sprockets.

Chains with O or X or Z rubber rings have grease between the pins and rollers. The rubber rings sit between the side plates and the rollers, are just there to hold the grease in and crap out.

You can have compressed and missing rubber ring and it will NOT lengthen the chain.
It is the wearing of the pins and roller diameters from dirt and dust, as well as the thinning and deepening of the sprocket teeth that loosen the chain on a bike and why you have to adjust them.
Okay fine, point is, it's the pins of the thing's clearance increasing not the metal stretching.

Some chains might also stretch in the side plates - different quality in steel.
I don't buy it. If you stretch the thing into plastic deformation, I'm guessing your moments away from having it fly apart. That's why big, high powered bikes have fat heavy chains. Who would give want all the weight and power loss of a fat chain, if you simply had to adjust a light, thin one more often.
 

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Big heavy bike need bike heavy chains.

the strength in chains is in the union between the Pin and the side plate.

Bigger bikes have more power and torque. Bigger pins are stronger. Bigger pins need bigger side plates and then you need thicker sprockets or you'll rip the teeth off, so that means the sum of all is bigger wider and heavier chains 520 < 525 < 530

Yes some people who race need to save weight and so they put on smaller 520 chains and sprockets as they are lighter. I wonder how long these last on a race bike compared to the correct sized chain? I would think they treat chains and sprockets like oil filters.
 

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just had my chain and sprockets changed...DID VX520 chain and Sunstar sprockets..stock up front..44t in the rear...
 

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"It is the wearing of the pins and roller diameters from dirt and dust, as well as the thinning and deepening of the sprocket teeth that loosen the chain on a bike and why you have to adjust them."

this is true. I don't believe chain links stretch either. guessing we could do the math, starting with the steel used in the links. anybody know the alloy? yield strength? gonna guess... vanadium steel... yield strength is about 110-115ksi
 

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Big heavy bike need bike heavy chains.

the strength in chains is in the union between the Pin and the side plate.

Bigger bikes have more power and torque. Bigger pins are stronger.
Correct, because as the stress on the metal increases, the more likely you are to put it into plastic deformation. Once there, it doesn't take a whole lot more stress to snap it.
Kawasaki isn't going to spec a chain for one of their bikes that is going to be over stressed by the bike's engine.
 

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...NOTE: what got me looking at the chain, was hearing a little grinding which I think was the tight chain clearance on the muffler....
Check your chain-alignment (DO NOT go by the marks on the swingarm), either w/ a tool, or string method. Here's some pics of doing it on my '08. First is mis-aligned;



second is aligned;



and next two show the swingarm marks AFTER aligning....





The side-to-side difference SEEMS small, but IS significant!!!

....How has anyone dealt with the tight chain to muffler clearance issue? That could be a chain-eater until rectified somehow. Thanks again!
After riding over 110,000 miles among THREE Vs - I've NEVER heard of, NOR seen evidence of - "a tight chain to muffler clearance issue"....
 

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Well, I do need an alignment tool beyond the eyeball: it's hard to get down that low without an alignment rack. I got the Motion Pro tool on order. It probably does not take long to screw a chain up misaligned.

I'm going to get the strong EK ZVX3 chain or older ZZZ chain that is thinner width and stronger and see how that goes. 7K miles on the other chain was not bad, but it sure isn't good. Safety First! With better chain alignment, adjusted more intervals, and better/stronger chain, hopefully I can get double that or maybe better :grin2: >:)

Check your chain-alignment (DO NOT go by the marks on the swingarm), either w/ a tool, or string method. Here's some pics of doing it on my '08. First is mis-aligned;



second is aligned;



and next two show the swingarm marks AFTER aligning....





The side-to-side difference SEEMS small, but IS significant!!!



After riding over 110,000 miles among THREE Vs - I've NEVER heard of, NOR seen evidence of - "a tight chain to muffler clearance issue"....
 

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Well, I do need an alignment tool beyond the eyeball: it's hard to get down that low without an alignment rack. I got the Motion Pro tool on order. It probably does not take long to screw a chain up misaligned.

I'm going to get the strong EK ZVX3 chain or older ZZZ chain that is thinner width and stronger and see how that goes. 7K miles on the other chain was not bad, but it sure isn't good. Safety First! With better chain alignment, adjusted more intervals, and better/stronger chain, hopefully I can get double that or maybe better :grin2: >:)


Hell i had over 22,000 miles on the stock chain when i sold the bike and it was still in great shape...
 

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I didn't know about the $15 alignment tool until yesterday!
:surprise::(:|

You didn't need to buy one. You could have used mine i have a bike thats shaft drive now and just hang onto the tool until i get my next bike that will have a chain...:smile2:
 

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You can also do it with a straight edge resting on the rear sprocket, and projecting out UNDER and CLOSE TO the chain's outer links, as I did... Mine needs to be half of the distance between two lines ahead on the right to be properly aligned.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
You can also do it with a straight edge resting on the rear sprocket, and projecting out UNDER and CLOSE TO the chain's outer links, as I did... Mine needs to be half of the distance between two lines ahead on the right to be properly aligned.
Invader, do you mean 1/2 the distance of the chain rollers between the links?

I guess this may not be a good thing for my uni-piece rear fender and chain guard: they are both going to have to be removed every chain adjustment. Oh well, ...
 

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Well, I do need an alignment tool beyond the eyeball: it's hard to get down that low without an alignment rack. I got the Motion Pro tool on order. It probably does not take long to screw a chain up misaligned.

I'm going to get the strong EK ZVX3 chain or older ZZZ chain that is thinner width and stronger and see how that goes. 7K miles on the other chain was not bad, but it sure isn't good. Safety First! With better chain alignment, adjusted more intervals, and better/stronger chain, hopefully I can get double that or maybe better :grin2: >:)

Only 7000 miles on a chain is terrible!! I've never gotten less than 18k on a chain in my life and that includes some made in the 60's. Don't know what you're doing or not doing, but something is not right somewhere.
Has anyone else gotten that few miles on a chain just riding on the hwys.? Could it be the air in LA?



Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Invader, do you mean 1/2 the distance of the chain rollers between the links?
For my rear wheel to be properly aligned, the rear axle needs to be moved forward on the right side, by half the distance between swingarm reference lines, which you relate to when adjusting your chain tension.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
For my rear wheel to be properly aligned, the rear axle needs to be moved forward on the right side, by half the distance between swingarm reference lines, which you relate to when adjusting your chain tension.
Ok, so you calibrate it to the lines on the axle and then you don't have to pull it out every time you adjust your chain. Thanks! Maybe I can keep the dual fender/chain guard. Because you are going to have to strip parts off to use it no matter what configuration you have anyway.
 
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