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Now I be told that my method is wrong, but it was explained to me by a motorcycle mechanic in England many years ago.

"The tension of your chain should be measured with the rider ON the bike, because this is when the chain tension is apparent, & it should be somewhere between 1/2 inch & 1 inch of slack."
 

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I go by the rider's manual, which states the proper amount of slack, measured whilst the bike is on the kickstand. I run it at the higher (looser) number in the manual, maybe even a tad looser. It does tighten when you sit on the bike, but I would hope the measurement in the rider's manual with the bike on the sidestand accounts for this. I'm thinking it does, as I think the upper range is 1.5 inches? So, sitting on the bike may compress it 0.5 inch, therefore agreeing with Brit's measurements.
 

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I go by the rider's manual, which states the proper amount of slack, measured whilst the bike is on the kickstand. I run it at the higher (looser) number in the manual, maybe even a tad looser. It does tighten when you sit on the bike, but I would hope the measurement in the rider's manual with the bike on the sidestand accounts for this. I'm thinking it does, as I think the upper range is 1.5 inches? So, sitting on the bike may compress it 0.5 inch, therefore agreeing with Brit's measurements.
It's not going to make the World stop spinning whichever method you use HG, but, the manual does not allow for the weight of the rider.



Just sayin' ......;)
 

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It's not going to make the World stop spinning whichever method you use HG, but, the manual does not allow for the weight of the rider.



Just sayin' ......;)
I know, so I'm just saying that it states 1.5 inches on the loose side, which should account for your loosest measurement of 1 inch measured when the rider is on the bike. Assuming, of course, that the spring weight is correct for the rider. Lots of variables. Just so long as it's not overly tight or loose, the world will be fine.
 

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I know, so I'm just saying that it states 1.5 inches on the loose side, which should account for your loosest measurement of 1 inch measured when the rider is on the bike. Assuming, of course, that the spring weight is correct for the rider. Lots of variables. Just so long as it's not overly tight or loose, the world will be fine.
Isn't shaft drive a wonderful idea!!!!!:clap:


The World is a good place to be!:thumb:
 

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Now I be told that my method is wrong, but it was explained to me by a motorcycle mechanic in England many years ago.

"The tension of your chain should be measured with the rider ON the bike, because this is when the chain tension is apparent, & it should be somewhere between 1/2 inch & 1 inch of slack."
As the tightest is when the THREE centers are directly IN LINE - the countershaft sprocket, swingarm pivot and rear axle, Kawasaki measures that, then saw how much 'slack' there is when the bike is resting on the 'stand', and put THAT into our manuals (1 to 1.4"). Having a rider on, EVEN a 300# rider will NOT change your 'slack' - ONLY the APPARENT slack as the centers are moving toward that tightest point.

It's not going to make the World stop spinning whichever method you use HG, but, the manual does not allow for the weight of the rider....Just sayin' ......;)
See above explanation.

Isn't shaft drive a wonderful idea!!!!!:clap:
Ask some of the BMW riders with failed shaft-drives.... (which seem to co$t more than a 520 chain... just sayin'....)
 

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If ya want to be REALLY sure, yank/unbolt the rear shock, line up the centers of CS, Swing Arm pivot and RS. Chain will never be tighter than at that point. Adjust for a little slack at that point. Put everything back together. Set bike on side stand and measure slack. Ta-da - perfect chain slack distance.
 

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If ya want to be REALLY sure, yank/unbolt the rear shock, line up the centers of CS, Swing Arm pivot and RS. Chain will never be tighter than at that point. Adjust for a little slack at that point. Put everything back together. Set bike on side stand and measure slack. Ta-da - perfect chain slack distance.
and because there is no factory given spec to your method there is no warranty so we will all be knocking at your door when our chains fail because you said it was OK :badidea:

follow the manual.
 

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and because there is no factory given spec to your method there is no warranty so we will all be knocking at your door when our chains fail because you said it was OK
Bwaaahhaahahahaaa! Really? Thanks for the chuckle. There IS NO better way to verify the manual than this. Do it. I double dog dare you. If you can somehow refute or prove this is worse than the manual, I will pay for a new chain & sprockets. My door is always open. :yeahsmile:
 

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If ya want to be REALLY sure, yank/unbolt the rear shock, line up the centers of CS, Swing Arm pivot and RS. Chain will never be tighter than at that point. Adjust for a little slack at that point. Put everything back together. Set bike on side stand and measure slack. Ta-da - perfect chain slack distance.
IF you do this, you WILL find that the published chain 'slack' is exactly what you will end up with, 'cause THAT is what Kawi did!
 

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Don't need to be too OCD about the chain, if you've had chained bikes for very long you can get a good idea about the slack after one measured adjustment and then eye ball it from then on. I've never put a measurement on the chain slack of the many bikes I've had over the years.
 

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I installed Speedy's lowering block so I wanted to check out the chain tension.
New bike, 0 miles, I will run chain on the loose side.
Good you checked. When I lowered mine, it was too tight per the Kawi manual. I run mine exactly the same tension. :thumb:
 

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If ya want to be REALLY sure, yank/unbolt the rear shock, line up the centers of CS, Swing Arm pivot and RS. Chain will never be tighter than at that point. Adjust for a little slack at that point. Put everything back together. Set bike on side stand and measure slack. Ta-da - perfect chain slack distance.
don't remove your shock set pre load to softest and loop a racket strap from swing arm over seat to other side of the arm and ratchet away to that point allot easier.
 
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