Kawasaki Versys Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,142 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
I purchased a gallon of kerosene from Walmart for 9 bucks and put some in a spray bottle. I have a grunge brush I bought from Cycle Gear and a can of Motul Chain lube/wax. I lube every 400-500 and clean every other lube. I put the bike on the center stand and spin the rear wheel by hand as I spray down the chain. Then dry with a microfiber cloth, let sit for about 15-20, then spray with the Motul and let sit over night. No problems with fling. So far, it works for me. The clean and lube process takes about 15-20 minutes because of the drying. Simply lubing the chain takes less than 5.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,427 Posts
Correction

The guy in the video is wrong about which products cause O ring swelling or shrinkage and perhaps an example of how myths can perpetuate themselves on the Internet.

An individual on advrider.com did some scientific testing on this a few years back. (click for thread) Alcohol will degrade rubber and gasoline contains alcohol (ethanol).

IMO a functional but perhaps an overly complex solution to chain cleaning compared to say a grunge brush (or dish pan brush/tooth brush), a spray bottle of cleaner and some shop towels. I say this because you still have to clean the bike afterwards to remove slippery fling off from the rear tire and rim so you might as well go ahead and make a mess cleaning the chain outdoors and then wash it off with detergent and water.

I do use a Grease Ninja for applying lube to the chain after cleaning. It is more efficient with the lube as it eliminates overspray and deposits lube evenly on both sides of the chain. You end up using much less lube as it all goes on the chain. On the downside I can never lube my chain completely without having the straw it comes to connect your chain lube can to the device pop out more than a few times.

++++++++++++++++++ cut and paste results below +++++++++++++++++++++++++
Table of results
Conclusion of short term exposure:
1. Carb cleaner and Gasoline samples swelled to significant sizes. Definitely not recommended to use these fluids to clean an O-ring type chain. The carb cleaner exposed O-ring increased in diameter by 29%! The gasoline exposed O-ring increased in diameter by 11%.
2. WD-40, and Kerosene seem to have negligible to no effect on the O-rings (+/-1%)
3. Brake fluid, and PJ1 chain lube seem to have a negligible to small effect on the O-ring’s size.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
> What do you guys think?

it's messier and takes longer to clean.
It did look messy! I use a small spray bottle with kerosene and a 3 sided brush I bought at a motorcycle shop. I place a 13 gallon trash bag underneath and spin the rear wheel by hand. The excess lands on the bag. I then wipe down with microfiber cloth, let dry, and lube with chain wax. Cheap, easy, effective. The bike sits over night, no problem with fling. I'm pretty new to this stuff. I figure if I follow the owners manual I'll be safe. I'm sure the people at Kawasaki who wrote it know a lot more than most. :clap:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,142 Posts
I do plan on removing the countershaft cover soon like Joe and cleaning the front sprocket. It looks pretty easy!


For the bolts on the counter shaft cover you'll need a 1/4" i think its a 8mm socket and 1/4"extension to remove.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
I have a similar product. Overall, I wouldn't recommend it for the following reasons:

1) the lower chain (where it's got to be placed because of hoses) needs to be level in order for the fluids to flow out properly, this is not possible with a versys on a stand (gen 2 at least) unless you raise the rear about 8". So the fluid leaks out the back of the device and gets all over.

2) it doesn't really work that well. The brushes inside aren't that aggressive, and apply a static pressure no matter what. For caked on bits, you still need to scrub by hand. Note this is intended to work in one direction, then you have to move to the other chain section (upper or lower) to get the 'other side' (front vs back, not inside vs outside) of the links - something done in one step with the standard grunge brush.

3) I found it wasted way too much cleaner. I thought it would collect in the container easier so you could keep pouring it in, but because it doesn't collect well - most ends up on the floor, device, hands etc.

4) you still need a grunge brush to clean the sprockets, so now you have 2 dirty tools instead of one.

For me, a standard grunge brush is direct, fully adjustable in terms of effort and focus on a dirty bit, is essentially 1-step cleaning, and you can easily control the cleaning solution - whatever you use. You still have to wipe it down, you still have to clean up the tool.

While it technically works to some degree, I don't think it saves any time or money. I tried it twice, haven't used it since.

Just my opinion of the one I have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
It sounds like the gent in the video is not from the US of A............perhaps the unleaded gasoline there doesn't have alcohol in it. I would prefer to use kerosene or diesel for cleaning. That tool actually looks pretty effective. I might have to try one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I think I'll stick with my grunge brush......yeah it's messy but it's much less complicated. I've been using wd40 to clean my chains for years and haven't had problems I'm glad to see that someone did actual scientific experiments and decided that I'm not hurting my chains.

Also for anyone interested.......this video is from "Andy Man Cam". He has a pretty good channel and is a fellow versys rider.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top