Kawasaki Versys Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
when doing a chain adjustment does the rear wheel have to be on a rear wheel stand or can it be on the ground on the side stand?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
It can be done just fine on the ground it just makes it a little harder to find the high spot in the in your chain & sprocket assembly . Have Fun :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
Remember looser is better than too tight. If you ever go to the track they will make you loosen it up considerably to what the factory says.

Todd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
since this was brought up can somebody tell me anything important when tightening the chain? I rode a buell before this and its belt driven...
oxman said something about a high spot in the chain and sprocket? what does that mean? I'm pretty oblivious I've been keeping it clean and well oiled and I know about an inch slack so its pretty good but I'm changing my front sprocket and yeah any help would be nice...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
When i mentioned about the high spot in your chain & sprocket i was refering to manufacturing tolerances in the sprockets which can give you a slight high spot in the sprocket which will relate to a tighter spot at a certain point in the rotation of the chain & sprocket . Rotate your rear wheel and check the chain deflection or slack at various points and you should a certain point at which the chain will be tighter than at other points of the rotation , you have now found the high spot ... Once this point is found then this is the position where you make your chain adjustments to the recomended manufacturs deflection . I hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
813 Posts
Chain Maintenance

What should be done regularly to the chain?
The manual says to oil it up every 450, which I've been doing and I've checked slack a few times too... how often should that be checked and tightened? Also should I be taking the chain off and cleaning it on a normal basis? Before I lube it up?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,433 Posts
Amir,
You'll have a HELLUVA time taking your 'endless' chain off to clean it! I would suggest spraying it with WD40 every now and then, after a ride while it's still warm, and then using a rag to rub the dirt and extra WD40 off it. You can also use a brush to rub the dirt loose after you spray it, then use the rag.
My KLR650 has 46,000 kms (28,000 miles) on its ORIGINAL chain doing what I just suggested with WD40!:thumb:
Ed
PS Don't forget - you're NOT lubing the chain (it's SEALED!), you're ensuring the O-rings don't bind against the side-plates and tear, allowing lube OUT of the chain!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,018 Posts
I think what oxman is calling high spot is more commonly known as a "tight spot" and it means just that, it's a section of the chain that has not worn evenly with the rest of the chain, producing less measurable slack when you look at that section. It's a lot easier to find if you have any significant ones while the rear wheel is in the air and you can freely rotate it. You'll also see links that "kinked", i.e. so tight they don't fully straighten out after coming off the sprocket. Usually that is caused by lack of lubrication and it signals the end of life for your chain, as it will wear much faster when those start to show up.

Amir - the best way to clean the chain is to use kerosene. Soak a rug in kerosene and use it to clean the chain as you rotate the wheel (having a rear stand really helps here). If you have a lot crud between the plates, a tooth brush works really well (don't use your tooth brush... ;) ). It can be a messy process (especially when using the brush), so cover the ground with some newspapers and wear your work cloths.

Gustavo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
I just got the Kettenmax chain cleaner and oiler. It works like a charm! Takes just a few minutes to get it set on the chain, rotate the chain through it twice and it's really clean. Then you spray whatever lube you like into the tool and you're done. It gets me to clean and oil it much more often than before.

Take a look at the review from webbikeworld. the only thing I'd add is that while it takes a bit to get it set up the first time, after than it's a snap.

http://www.webbikeworld.com/r3/kettenmax-chain-cleaner/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I have a Scottoiler on my KLR with the chain @ 30,000km now. Thinking seriously about getting one for the V too! The Scottoil cleans off a lot easier that spray on chain lube too! And if you are off roading you can turn it up a little to keep your chain quite a bit cleaner. Think I might add one when I do the Vacuum line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Chain Adjustment

Hi Buck

Just for your info,I have had a scottoiler on my V for 9 months now,I expect you know but it fits very well behind the left hand tank fairing,you'll find info on installing on the uk Versy forum.Access is either from below to left of forks looking up,or,from right side of bike looking across ign. key thro gap,I personally use a lube tube mounted under the seat meaning I have no need to access the reservoir.The oiler works bl...y well as I expect you know.
BTW also done vacuum mod on my bike some time ago,a transformation,smoother,no throttle snatch or over sensitivity,just sounds happier,you do seen to lose a fair amount of engine braking tho.don't know why.
Twohoots
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Ok, my chain has gone pretty slack, can someone point me in the right direction so I can properly adjust the chain?

Thanks,

Oz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,007 Posts
This isn't the only way, maybe not the best way, but its what I use and it works great for me.

There is a vertical weld on the swing arm close towards the front of the swing arm. Take small ruler and pull the chain up as hard as you can directly above that weld. If measurement is around 45mm or 1 3/4", my chain is tensioned correctly (tx alvis).

There is also a detailed way in your operators manual;

Drive Chain Slack Inspection
NOTE
○Check the slack with the motorcycle setting on its side-stand.
○Clean the chain if it is dirty, and lubricate it if it appears
dry.
•Check the wheel alignment (seeWheel Alignment Inspection).
•Rotate the rear wheel to find the position where the chain
is tightest. •Measure the vertical movement (chain slack) [A] midway
between the sprockets.
If the chain slack exceeds the standard, adjust it.
Chain Slack
Standard: 25 ∼ 35 mm (1.0 ∼ 1.4 in.)
Drive Chain Slack Adjustment •Raise the rear wheel off the ground with the stand. •Remove the cotter pin [A], and loosen the axle nut . •Loosen the both chain adjuster lock-nuts [C].
If the chain is too loose, turn out the right and left chain
adjusters [D] evenly.
If the chain is too tight, turn in the right and left chain
adjusters evenly, and kick the wheel forward. •Turn both chain adjusters evenly until the drive chain has
the correct amount of slack. To keep the chain and wheel
properly aligned, the notch [E] on the left wheel alignment
indicator [F] should align with the same swing-arm mark or
position [G] that the right indicator notch aligns with.
WARNING
Misalignment of the wheel will result in abnormal
wear and may result in an unsafe riding condition.
•Tighten both chain adjuster lock-nuts securely. •Tighten the axle nut.
Torque - Rear Axle Nut: 108 N·m (11.0 kgf·m, 80 ft·lb)
•Turn the wheel,measure the chain slack again

Most important thing you can do for your chain once its correctly adjusted is lube it every 300-500 miles. Mine has around 11k miles on it now and other than when I put the 16tooth sprocket on it, its never needed adjusting.

The adjuster lock nuts are 12mm, if you have two 12mm wrenches its much easier. The axle nuts are 22mm & 27mm, not in your typical socket set. If you are thinking of getting some, buy the six sided black impact sockets, not the chrome multi-sided ones. Most of the V's nuts and bolts were over-torqued by some over sexed gorilla that didn't know his own strength.

Machog
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top