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Discussion Starter #1
I read all the threads on this, but did not find this. Real rookie question. I need to put some slack in my chain (long story). When I turn adjuster (inward/clockwise I think) will it pull the axle forward with it, or will I have to drive the axle forward with a plastic or rubber mallet? Thanks.
 

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I read all the threads on this, but did not find this. Real rookie question. I need to put some slack in my chain (long story). When I turn adjuster (inward/clockwise I think) will it pull the axle forward with it, or will I have to drive the axle forward with a plastic or rubber mallet? Thanks.
When you turn the adjusters out/counterclockwise, it pulls the axle back (not forward) as chain slack is reduced... It is still good practice to bump the tire forward to ensure axle is well seated on the adjusters before tightening axle nut.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the tips guys. It really is easy, even for a non-mechanical guy like me. One tip I would offer if you need to ADD slack via the adjustment: Turn the adjuster bolts in farther than necessary (giving too much slack), move the axle forward against the adjuster bolts, then tighten the axle nut so there is just a little tightness of the axle movement. Then use the adjuster bolts to push the axle back to your desired chain slack. If the axle nut is really loose, the axle tends to move around while you are making your adjustments. For somebody that has not searched and is planning to due this for the first time; you need a 27 mm socket for the axle nut, torque wrench, 22mm socket to hold the nut on the other side of the axle (mine actually did not spin while torquing the axle nut and you can get by not buying the 22 if you have a large enough open end) and a new cotter pin 5/32" x 1.5 inch.
 

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The EASIEST way to ensure your wheel is FULLY forward is to put a screwdriver between the chain and sprocket on the lower run, then turn the wheel forewards (CCW viewed from the sprocket side) while tightening the axle nut. Then turn the wheel back and remove the screwdriver.

I do this EVERY time I'm in the process of re-tightening the axle nut.
 

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When you turn the adjusters in clockwise, it pulls the axle back (not forward) as chain slack is reduced... It is still good practice to bump the tire forward to ensure axle is well seated on the adjusters before tightening axle nut.
First sentence is backwards: it should say: clockwise / inward moves only the screw, does NOT move the axle, and allows chain slack to INCREASE ..when you bump the tire forward yourself.
 

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I always have to re-check after I tighten the axle. Not sure why, but it seems to get tighter every time. So I have to re-do the whole process. Is this normal for everyone, or am I missing a step?
 

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The adjustment screws push the axle backward. You will need to push your rear wheel forward against them to see the effect of the adjustment. Adjust slack with the left adjuster first, then bring the wheel into alignment with the right adjuster. Set for 2.5-3.0cm slack. Slack is measured at the chain midpoint from the bottom of the chain, pulled tight upward, to the bottom of the chain, pulled downward. Or the top of the chain, just use the same side on both measurements. I use a popsicle stick I've marked 2.75cm on because it is easy to stick behind chain for this measurement. Recheck slack after adjusting both sides and redo if necessary.
 

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I always have to re-check after I tighten the axle. Not sure why, but it seems to get tighter every time. So I have to re-do the whole process. Is this normal for everyone, or am I missing a step?
Next time try making LESS adjustments, then tighten your axle (using a screwdriver between the teeth - at about the 6 o'clock pos'n - then turning the wheel CCW to take up slack, BEFORE tightening the axle-nut), and re-check the chain slack. When I 'do' mine, I usually do either ONE or TWO "flats" total. [A "flat" is 1/6th of a turn of the adjuster.]

AND I recheck the slack after (but BEFORE I put the cotter-pin in).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I know somebody told me the answer, but getting old has made me forget. If you adjust the chain while the rear wheel is on a track stand; will the chain slack be more or less when you sit on the bike when the wheel is back on the ground? I did read the other thread about various adjusting methods, but not sure if I got the correct answer out of that one. Thx, CJC
 

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I know somebody told me the answer, but getting old has made me forget. If you adjust the chain while the rear wheel is on a track stand; will the chain slack be more or less when you sit on the bike when the wheel is back on the ground? I did read the other thread about various adjusting methods, but not sure if I got the correct answer out of that one. Thx, CJC
bike on a rear stand will have about the same tension as it on the side stand. book says to adjust and measure slack with it on the stand.... in theory when the suspension is compressed the chain will tighten slightly but in reality it really doesnt move enough to really cause any problems unless your chain is way over tight to start with
 

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Main thing is that will be tightest when drive sprocket, swing arm spindle, and rear axle are in line, and chain is at tightest position. Can vary a good deal around the course of driving the bike.
 

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I know somebody told me the answer, but getting old has made me forget. If you adjust the chain while the rear wheel is on a track stand; will the chain slack be more or less when you sit on the bike when the wheel is back on the ground? I did read the other thread about various adjusting methods, but not sure if I got the correct answer out of that one. Thx, CJC
To answer your question, Chuck:

"If you adjust the chain while the rear wheel is on a track stand; will the chain slack be more or less when you sit on the bike when the wheel is back on the ground?"

It SHOULD be LESS as your wheel has moved, however SLIGHTLY, toward the point where the THREE centers are INLINE (swingarm, countershaft sprocket, axle) at which point (as ALREADY pointed out) the chain will be its TIGHTEST.

How you enjoying the 127F weather???
 

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chain

I found that if the chain is adjusted to about 27mm the transmission shifts better- less clunk and adding a shim washer behind the shifter od 30mm id 19mm .0015" thick lubing with moly grease takes out most of the shift lever slope and makes shifting more positive
 

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one more thing to consider is the alignment of the chain with both sprocket and wheel. Try using a chain aligning tool and you get a smooth chain run on the sprocket.
 

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