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Discussion Starter #1
Coming from a suzuki katana 750, the brakes seem mushy and slow on the V. I've scared myself with lots of traffic and sudden stops (even though I always give proper distance, especially during and congestion) where I thought I wasn't going to stop. I've only had the bike for 180 miles now (3 days) and that's the first thing I notice that needs attention...

A lot of the big motorcycle parts catalogues have nothing to offer in terms of brakes for the V.

Anybody have any suggestions, or preferably experiences..
 

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Plenty of owners commented that steel braided lines helped. Plus if you're riding an 07-09 model, it is claimed that a 10-12 master pump swapped improved the braking too. Last but not least a change of the pads to HH rated sintered pads would complete the deal.

Personally, i am riding an '11, had steel braided line but i still find the stopping power lacking. i also read from somewhere that the stock, oem pad is already HH rated. i am considering switching to a 4-pot caliper and a 16mm master pump, if i can find a deal good enough.
 

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Plenty of owners commented that steel braided Personally, i am riding an '11, had steel braided line but i still find the stopping power lacking. i also read from somewhere that the stock, oem pad is already HH rated. i am considering switching to a 4-pot caliper and a 16mm master pump, if i can find a deal good enough.
Not all HH rated pads are the same. It's just a measurement of friction. I'm probably going to install a set of Galfers ceramic pads to get a better intial bite and more linear feel. This will add loads of confidece in the braking ability of the bike. The EBC HH pads are also pretty descent, but hard on the rotors.

The factory Vstrom pads were also HH rated, but a swap to the Galfers on that bike made a world of difference.
 

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I came to the Versys from motorcycles with not fantastic brakes, so please bear with me if the following is/sounds ignorant:

Isn't the stopping power (or lack thereof) of the Versys mostly in "feel", not so much in actual stopping capacity?

The limit of stopping power is the traction of the tires, right? Even in a steady squeeze I can get the front to lock up, which is just past maximum braking. I just can't do it with just two fingers.

Do steel brake lines and better pads really improve the bike's braking power like shorter stopping distance, or just brake feel for better brake modulation?
 

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Son, with 180 miles, your pads may not be bedded in yet. Do that- pick a lonely road, 60-20mph hard braking 3 or 4 times, then let them cool for a few minutes. Repeat. And again. That might help.
I switched to EBC HH pads and SS brake lines and I like the feel of the brakes now, firm lever, progressive feel, two-finger braking. I did de-glaze once, lightly abrading the pads with sandpaper. And Pretbek, you may be right, maybe not more power in a full-hand squeeze, just better feel in everyday sporty riding.
The 2012 Ninja650 uses the same pin-slide calipers as we have, and MCN got really impressive stops in a recent test: 60-0mph in 115.6'. Different pad compound and stickier tires are now stock on that bike. I think the Master-cylinder changed with the '09 model on the Versys, the new Ninja now sports the same classy-looking unit!
 

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My bad. I am trained to ride with 2-finger braking and rarely pulls the lever with anything more, hence my complaint on the lack of stopping power.

However i am still very much inclined to believe a larger pump and better caliper helps, apart from having a stickier front tyre, very much like the way an RCS19 and an M4 monoblock upgrade for some supersports does.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I read a lot of posts stating "install SS brake lines..." and then read all the replies, "I did just that and don't feel (that much) difference". If I could get some at a reasonable price, and I could do the job with basic tools I will do it.

I have a 2011 for starters, so I have te "upgraded" master cylinder. And our pads are HH rated... I've read a post on here someone had the EBC pads then upgraded to another pad (starts with a V) and they were much better.


So about this glazing issue. Did I "glaze" my pads? Will a session of hard braking and cooling fix that or as someone mentioned, sandpaper? I will be pretty pissed if I wasn't told by the dealer about this, because I've done dozens of brake jobs in cars and had no such problems.

Point me to SS lines for our bikes please?

Thanks for the replies guys. In terms of performance upgrades, brakes and tires are #1(to me) Not exhausts and air filters. I found one good thread on pads but live feedback is better than an old saved conversation.
 

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I came to the Versys from motorcycles with not fantastic brakes,
Me too! My C50 was a truck and took a long time to stop. I can put the Versys on a dime in comparison. When I first rode it, i was like "Damn these are great brakes!!" :thumb:
 

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Coming from a suzuki katana 750, the brakes seem mushy and slow on the V. I've scared myself with lots of traffic and sudden stops (even though I always give proper distance, especially during and congestion) where I thought I wasn't going to stop. I've only had the bike for 180 miles now (3 days) and that's the first thing I notice that needs attention...

A lot of the big motorcycle parts catalogues have nothing to offer in terms of brakes for the V.

Anybody have any suggestions, or preferably experiences..
It is not really the brakes that are responsible. It is the long travel front suspension is diving more than you are used to with the Kantana every time you hit the brakes. In reality the Versys stopping distance is very short, it is just that the feeling of the bike diving will feel different to you and take some getting used to coming from a sport bike with much firmer suspension. There is a period of acclimation just as there is getting used to a different sweet spot in the power band, the Vs engine likes to run/shift at a lower RPM than the Kantanas. Using the rear brake will help stabilize the bike in hard braking.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks! I did end up running a series of 60-20 stops on a desolate back road.. I was able to get a better feel for them, but I do realise now that I'm being hasty in general. It's too earl to come to any conclusions like I need new brakes. I did break loose in the tea a little bit on semi wet roads but I also downshifted pretty vigorously. Today I really tried pushin the brakes to the limit.

The tires, too have people worked up. I haven't noticed any serious differences from the pilot road 2s on my katana. Except that the tread on those, with 5-600 miles on them are deeper than the dunlops which have 225 now.
I think I'll sve my money on tires until these wear out.
 

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Andrew, what radiator guard do you have? I found some on eBay but they're probably junk.
Mine is something that looked like this :



why do you think those in ebays are junk? too flashy and blocks airflow?
 

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To get more hydraulic pressure, you go SMALLER on master cylinder bore size, not larger.
while i understand the logic you're putting forward, i wonder why them japs supersports uses a 16mm piston instead of 14mm as it is on our Versys OEM pump?

plus another friend who is riding a '10 Kawa ZX6r switched from the stock 16mm master pump to the Brembo RCS19 19mm pump (while maintaining the same caliper) remarked vast improvement over the braking feel and stopping power.

how do we explain that then?
 

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while i understand the logic you're putting forward, i wonder why them japs supersports uses a 16mm piston instead of 14mm as it is on our Versys OEM pump?

plus another friend who is riding a '10 Kawa ZX6r switched from the stock 16mm master pump to the Brembo RCS19 19mm pump (while maintaining the same caliper) remarked vast improvement over the braking feel and stopping power.

how do we explain that then?
A larger bore will require more pressure at the lever but require less lever travel.
 

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The larger the piston diameter, the greater the amount of fluid that is forced out of the master cylinder when the lever is pulled over a equal distance. However, the extra fluid requires extra force to move it.

Inter-axis is the distance between the lever's pivot point and the plunger that pushes into the cylinder. With a shorter inter-axis, leverage is increased which improves control and makes it easier to apply braking force with more lever travel.

Also, most quality aftermaket brake master cylinders such as Brembo are radial for improved leverage geometry and plunger actuation.



http://www.lemickracing.com/tech-faqs/14-brakes/46-brake-master-cylinder-piston-diameters-and-leverage-offsets
 
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