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Summary: Galfer is good but not perfect, and it is a bitch of job diy. But better than oem lines installed by a sketchy dealership mechanic.

Hopefully this will help others considering replacing their lines (per the 5 year interval specified by Kawasaki).

This was on my 2015 V650 with ABS. The kit I installed was the Galfer FK003D803-6 purchased from a big online motorcycle parts seller.

The kit is identified as 6 lines for front and rear, but in fact it is just 4 lines because they have pre-assembled some of it. Galfer's site identifies it as for the 2014-2019 Ninja 1000. The retailer's site listed the 2015-2016 V650 plus a whole bunch of other Kawasaki models of those years. The kit does fit but not perfectly. Three of the 4 lines are about 4 inches too long, presumably to account for the longer V1000. The slack can be taken up but it would be a lot better if the lines were the correct length.

Galfer does not list a kit specifically for the 2015 V650. The seller may be making things up? Doing it again I would contact Galfer directly. I'm not saying don't use the kit I did, just saying Galfer may make a better fitting kit.

The lines themselves seem very high quality and very well assembled. Fittings are already attached. My only gripe is that the ends which screw into the ABS module do not take a metric wrench. But once installed I don't see a reason for that to be a problem nor a reason to carry the 5/16 wrench on trips. The banjo bolts are 14mm. New banjo bolts and copper crush washers are included in the kit.

The lines are smaller outer diameter than factory, so they don't fit the various rubber grommets that hold the lines to the frame. I added zip ties in a few places to secure them. Any brand stainless steel lines will have this problem.

To replace brake lines you'll have to remove body panels, the seat, and the gas tank. I highly recommend removing the battery box too. That is an annoying task but worth it.

The ABS module is buried deep under the battery box, under where the front of the seat meets the gas tank. The lines have a 90 degree fitting that threads into the aluminum ABS module. The space is very tight and it is super fiddling to unscrew the old lines and properly thread the new lines. The ABS module costs $1100, so don't crossthread the fittings!!! Thus it is best to remove the battery box for easy access from above.

The Galfer front line lines are not configured as OEM. OEM has one line down to the left caliper and then a line loops from there over the front fender to the right caliper. The new line has a T at the bottom of the triple tree and then a separate line runs down to each caliper. Thus the right line doesn't have the same kind of anchoring as the left. A small cosmetic issue and requires some zip tie creativity.

This is a good opportunity to rebuild the brake calipers. New rubber seals are cheap, and the calipers really do need a comprehensive cleaning and rebuild every few years.

In a perfect world with a convenient and trusted local mechanic, where the OEM lines didn't cost a ridiculous amount ($520 front + $220 rear o_O ), I wouldn't do the work myself or use stainless steel (because of the smaller diameter). But the stainless lines last a lifetime and the cost of diy is so much less, making it a viable option. Too bad the bike doesn't come new from the factory with high quality stainless steel lines.
 

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Great write up. Yea I thought of doing the stainless on my 15 650 too at one time but it seemed like a real production with the ABS and scared me off. Would love more braking power on my rear. I changed to those double sintered (metal?) brake pads and they help if you have a clean brake disk.
 
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