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I had a near miss on my c-10 Concours which I would attribute to the "two lights" issue. That bike had the single headlight augmented by driving ;lights mounted fairly low and wide on the "tipover" bars. I was having an issue with the bike headlight sometimes cutting out but wasn't too worried about as I had the driving lights.

The commute was mostly on skinny back country two lane roads, mostly with no shoulder. On my way to work at about 4a.m. I was coming up on a group of three cars coming at me. Being this time of night the road is usually deserted I had a bad feeling on this developing situation so I moved hard over to as far as I could get into the right part of the lane, pretty much on the fog line. Sure as shootin' the rear car jumped out to briskly pass. No time for avoidance and no where to go if there was time except into a water filled ditch. We all fit, I came really close to having to change underwear.

When I got to work, about a mile and a half away, I noticed that my bike headlight was not working.(The driving lights were of sufficient quality that they made the bike headlight redundant). I'm thinking that I looked like a car in the distance to the passer. I repaired that headlight when I got home that afternoon.
I reckon intersections where a car could turn into your
path or even turn left (right down here in Australia) while you are oncoming
could be a problem too.
 

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in the new V1000, both led lights are illuminated. i think all that thing about cars crashing into you because they think you are a car far away, is just far from very convincing. also, it could theoretically happen only if both car and the bike are riding on a single lane. in such case, it would be sensible to turn the 'high' beam off and on again as a warning.
Wrong....
181017
 

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anyway, assuming that there is a real danger the car can confuse the distance from the rider, which i am not that sure about
Probably a major cause for vehicles turning LEFT into a motorcycle - thinking it is FAR AWAY...!
 

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if you guys lived in India, you would not worry about things like this. Drivers blind you all the time with high beams, and pass other cars at the corners. One has to be ready for the worse all the time.

First of all, having two lights is great for day time riding. Second, the danger that car will see you from close distance assuming that it is a car far away is very small. And if you ride on narrow roads, you can always turn off the 'high' beam if a car is approaching. And as someone mentioned here, having fog lights can create the same confusion in perspective/distance. So what is left? Staying at home in the night :)
 

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Probably a major cause for vehicles turning LEFT into a motorcycle - thinking it is FAR AWAY...!
Down here in Australia and also Thailand we drive on the left side of the road...
our cars are right hand drive. So of course it's car drivers turning right into
us that we need to be aware of... as per the diagram.

For the USA it would look like this of course:
181021

if you guys lived in India, you would not worry about things like this. Drivers blind you all the time with high beams, and pass other cars at the corners. One has to be ready for the worse all the time.

First of all, having two lights is great for day time riding. Second, the danger that car will see you from close distance assuming that it is a car far away is very small. And if you ride on narrow roads, you can always turn off the 'high' beam if a car is approaching. And as someone mentioned here, having fog lights can create the same confusion in perspective/distance. So what is left? Staying at home in the night :)
Or if you have twin headlights that only run one light at a time, don't change it.
Why do you think the manufacturers are now making them that way?
 

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This became much longer than intended. If you don’t ride at night, at speed, this probably won’t have any relevance to you.

Let me start by saying I ride at night a lot. And I ride a fair bit. I ride city streets, highways, country roads, and suburban streets - every day, twice a day, in all weather. Heck, I sometimes ride the busiest highway in North America - Hwy 401 through Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 18 lanes packed full of transport trucks and frustrated commuters doing anywhere from 0 to 140kph, with some idiots reversing and others trying to set land speed records, and constant road repairs. I also ride gravel logging roads cut through forrest. I’ve witnessed every kind of bad driver (but many more good!) there is out there. I’ve had to avoid animals on the road from mice to moose, and the occasional bird from sparrows to eagles. I have read many technical documents and reports on vehicle lighting. I’ve spoken at length with automotive lighting engineers. This all might suggest I’m somewhat qualified to make statements on this topic. Let me share a bit of my knowledge.

Being seen is important. Not being confused for another type of vehicle is important. Not being a target, or blinding other motorists is also important. Being able to see what you are approaching, or what is approaching you, is paramount. There are quality lights that can do this, if you are willing to spend the money for them. There are tried and true patterns to mount the lights that will make a difference.

Based on my riding, I need lights that work, and work well in a variety of situations and conditions. This is why I ride a Gen 2 V650. The headlight design is very, very good. With good LED bulbs they are even better. Some say ugly, but I’ll take function over form every time. In addition, I have a pair of flood lights (2200 lumens each) mounted low and wide on the engine guards, and a pair of spot lights (2000 lumens each) mounted on either side of the headlight. Both pairs of aux lights are controlled by a single switch. The flood lights are on with the low beam. They turn off and the spotlights turn on with the high beam.

I’ve seen and read how dismal the Gen 3 lights are. All for styling. Don’t waste your time trying to fix a bad design. Unless you are willing to spend a lot to retrofit the lights, just add good aux lights. Try to make a triangle pattern when viewed from the front. This has been proven to provide the best lighting and it provides oncoming motorists the best representation of the rate of closure. Just ask any locomotive engineer, they know.

If your primary concern with lighting (or motorcycling in general) is esthetics, I’d recommend you have a good life insurance policy and keep your will up to date. And volunteer for organ donation, in the hopes you can do someone else some good.

Good lux and happy riding!
 

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This became much longer than intended. If you don’t ride at night, at speed, this probably won’t have any relevance to you.

Let me start by saying I ride at night a lot. And I ride a fair bit. I ride city streets, highways, country roads, and suburban streets - every day, twice a day, in all weather. Heck, I sometimes ride the busiest highway in North America - Hwy 401 through Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 18 lanes packed full of transport trucks and frustrated commuters doing anywhere from 0 to 140kph, with some idiots reversing and others trying to set land speed records, and constant road repairs. I also ride gravel logging roads cut through forrest. I’ve witnessed every kind of bad driver (but many more good!) there is out there. I’ve had to avoid animals on the road from mice to moose, and the occasional bird from sparrows to eagles. I have read many technical documents and reports on vehicle lighting. I’ve spoken at length with automotive lighting engineers. This all might suggest I’m somewhat qualified to make statements on this topic. Let me share a bit of my knowledge.

Being seen is important. Not being confused for another type of vehicle is important. Not being a target, or blinding other motorists is also important. Being able to see what you are approaching, or what is approaching you, is paramount. There are quality lights that can do this, if you are willing to spend the money for them. There are tried and true patterns to mount the lights that will make a difference.

Based on my riding, I need lights that work, and work well in a variety of situations and conditions. This is why I ride a Gen 2 V650. The headlight design is very, very good. With good LED bulbs they are even better. Some say ugly, but I’ll take function over form every time. In addition, I have a pair of flood lights (2200 lumens each) mounted low and wide on the engine guards, and a pair of spot lights (2000 lumens each) mounted on either side of the headlight. Both pairs of aux lights are controlled by a single switch. The flood lights are on with the low beam. They turn off and the spotlights turn on with the high beam.

I’ve seen and read how dismal the Gen 3 lights are. All for styling. Don’t waste your time trying to fix a bad design. Unless you are willing to spend a lot to retrofit the lights, just add good aux lights. Try to make a triangle pattern when viewed from the front. This has been proven to provide the best lighting and it provides oncoming motorists the best representation of the rate of closure. Just ask any locomotive engineer, they know.

If your primary concern with lighting (or motorcycling in general) is esthetics, I’d recommend you have a good life insurance policy and keep your will up to date. And volunteer for organ donation, in the hopes you can do someone else some good.

Good lux and happy riding!
My old Connie had the same setup as you have. Floods(Chinese Hella) for low beam and a pair of awesome Hella FF200(made in Germany) driving lights for high. Excellent for in the dark riding with little glare.
 
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just put both lights on, and do not worry. you guys in US worry too much. too much yellow chicken:)
 

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This became much longer than intended. If you don’t ride at night, at speed, this probably won’t have any relevance to you.

Let me start by saying I ride at night a lot. And I ride a fair bit. I ride city streets, highways, country roads, and suburban streets - every day, twice a day, in all weather. Heck, I sometimes ride the busiest highway in North America - Hwy 401 through Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 18 lanes packed full of transport trucks and frustrated commuters doing anywhere from 0 to 140kph, with some idiots reversing and others trying to set land speed records, and constant road repairs. I also ride gravel logging roads cut through forrest. I’ve witnessed every kind of bad driver (but many more good!) there is out there. I’ve had to avoid animals on the road from mice to moose, and the occasional bird from sparrows to eagles. I have read many technical documents and reports on vehicle lighting. I’ve spoken at length with automotive lighting engineers. This all might suggest I’m somewhat qualified to make statements on this topic. Let me share a bit of my knowledge.

Being seen is important. Not being confused for another type of vehicle is important. Not being a target, or blinding other motorists is also important. Being able to see what you are approaching, or what is approaching you, is paramount. There are quality lights that can do this, if you are willing to spend the money for them. There are tried and true patterns to mount the lights that will make a difference.

Based on my riding, I need lights that work, and work well in a variety of situations and conditions. This is why I ride a Gen 2 V650. The headlight design is very, very good. With good LED bulbs they are even better. Some say ugly, but I’ll take function over form every time. In addition, I have a pair of flood lights (2200 lumens each) mounted low and wide on the engine guards, and a pair of spot lights (2000 lumens each) mounted on either side of the headlight. Both pairs of aux lights are controlled by a single switch. The flood lights are on with the low beam. They turn off and the spotlights turn on with the high beam.

I’ve seen and read how dismal the Gen 3 lights are. All for styling. Don’t waste your time trying to fix a bad design. Unless you are willing to spend a lot to retrofit the lights, just add good aux lights. Try to make a triangle pattern when viewed from the front. This has been proven to provide the best lighting and it provides oncoming motorists the best representation of the rate of closure. Just ask any locomotive engineer, they know.

If your primary concern with lighting (or motorcycling in general) is esthetics, I’d recommend you have a good life insurance policy and keep your will up to date. And volunteer for organ donation, in the hopes you can do someone else some good.

Good lux and happy riding!
(y)(y)
 

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just put both lights on, and do not worry. you guys in US worry too much. too much yellow chicken:)
By your standard Kris, riding a motorcycle is an act of courage (or lack of courage if
you run one light at a time).

Perhaps you would like to show us how good
you are at playing Russian Roulette?

My standard Kris is; riding a motorcycle is an act of enjoyment and transport.

Being crashed into by a car with a dirty windscreen imho is counter productive
to both my motorcycling standards.
 

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as I wrote many times, if one is afraid, one can switch to a single light when riding on a narrow road in the night. or turn the high beam off and on to warn the approaching car. having yellow fog lights creates a kind a triangle, which provides an additional security in that respect. and one more thing, if LED bulbs are fitted, the two lights kind of blend into one due to the fact that LED's are wider spread inside the headlight housing.
yellow light.jpg
 

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just put both lights on, and do not worry. you guys in US worry too much. too much yellow chicken:)
I can’t run both sets of aux lights at the same time for a couple reasons:
The charging system can’t handle the draw. The light pattern from the flood lights puts so much light on the ground close to me, that long distance vision is impaired.

If you had stopped to think before replying, you might have considered that I’ve spent a LOT of time researching and designing every facet of my bike. And that I was sharing valuable knowledge. But, @Kris you don’t. Best of luck to you in the future, and welcome to the block list. You are the first!
 

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I can’t run both sets of aux lights at the same time for a couple reasons:
The charging system can’t handle the draw. The light pattern from the flood lights puts so much light on the ground close to me, that long distance vision is impaired.

If you had stopped to think before replying, you might have considered that I’ve spent a LOT of time researching and designing every facet of my bike. And that I was sharing valuable knowledge. But, @Kris you don’t. Best of luck to you in the future, and welcome to the block list. You are the first!
you are one angry fellow. and what is the mystery bout running fog lights? some of them draw very little power, and they work great.
 

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If you had stopped to think before replying, you might have considered that I’ve spent a LOT of time researching and designing every facet of my bike. And that I was sharing valuable knowledge...
i stopped to think, and find myself in the ultra hi-viz camp along with Senor 16VGTIDave. my criteria is to have enough light stabbing out from the front of the bike to read a newpaper at 1 mile in the darkest night. ok, ok, i might have to squint a little for the fine print, but the headlines are right there. of course, when i try to read the news in close to the bike, the paper tends to catch fire. i run all the lights in daytime traffic, and at night, nope, don't dim ever. some random cager objects by blipping the high beams at me, that's great, they see me.

one of the additional things i do is to add LED clearance lights both red and amber, the same very bright LED lights used on trucks, they make a big difference in making the bike more visible, especially to turning vehicles, or those coming up behind you.





as for that yellow chicken dooood, he can hide that yellow chicken where the sun...whoa, got to remember to be polite around here.
 

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...

Based on my riding, I need lights that work, and work well in a variety of situations and conditions. This is why I ride a Gen 2 V650. The headlight design is very, very good. With good LED bulbs they are even better. Some say ugly, but I’ll take function over form every time. In addition, I have a pair of flood lights (2200 lumens each) mounted low and wide on the engine guards, and a pair of spot lights (2000 lumens each) mounted on either side of the headlight. Both pairs of aux lights are controlled by a single switch. The flood lights are on with the low beam. They turn off and the spotlights turn on with the high beam.
...
Dave
Do you have a pic of your light setup ?

An btw, I have a first gen V, and also find that the oem lighting is very good !

LOP
 

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Dave
Do you have a pic of your light setup ?
i've used a bunch of different LED lights, and since i'm working on my own motos i can pretty much fit anything. the new bike gets three 4" and one 3" on the front. i'm also using the LED marker lights. i gave up on using any expensive LED lights, these V649 motos have an unsettled relationship with gravity.
 

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But - MAYBE not as 'pretty'...!
My Gen 2s headlight is good too.
My ZX12s headlights are not as good as the versys
Also the versys headlight is better than my Gen 1 ZX10R
I had an E model DRZ400 its single slightly trapezoid headlight was
was about the same as my gen 2s as far as effectiveness.

The best headlight on any motorcycle I have ever had
was the standard rectangular Stanley on a C model KLX650.
The high beam was a veritable searchlight... it was grouse.
You could see far and wide even in a massive storm at night.

That KLX was advertised in South Australia about 750 kilometres
away from where I lived at the time.
I caught the train at about 10pm and arrived in Adelaide
early morning. Caught a cab to the used motorcycle dealers. By the time
we'd done the paperwork/registration and funds transfer
it was about 5:30pm the sun setting in about 1/2 an hour and I had 750Km
to ride the KLX to get home. Just as I was leaving the Adelaide metro
area it got dark and a storm hit... when I say storm I mean storm,
lots of wind and the rain was bucketing down with heaps of lightening and thunder.

Just for good measure, the weather in this part of the world
travels East... the exact direction I was travelling. That massive storm
on that dark and lonely road kept me company all the way home. The big rectangular KLX headlight
lit the way brilliantly, the engine was strong and didn't miss a stroke. That Kwaka defied the elements
and I was reveling in the performance of the machine, blasting along all the way home.
Soaked to the skin (for about the last 8 hours), and a smile from ear to ear as I pulled into the driveway, well knowing I acquired a sensational bike.

I'd put those 750 kilometres among the best rides of my life.

That was a great bike, pity Kawasaki stopped making them.

I shot the below photo a couple of months after I bought it Circa 2000/1. Sold it 2005
to pay rent and school fees. :(
181041
 
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