Kawasaki Versys Forum banner
1 - 20 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
If you are on ADV you might contact Roger04Rt he is an absolute expert on these and other methods of tweaking fueling. He sorted my 14" Husqvarna TR650 and it ran better than anyone else that had one that I rode with.

I used an LC2 on my Husky. But if the ECU on the Versys will not learn to negate the settings it will work fine. Husky used a Magnetti Marelli ECU and it had the ability to eventually negate any setting that the booster plug had and reverted to the OEM settings. I finally ended up using the LC2 to spoof the AFR at the exhaust output. Once I did that I never had to look back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Please don't fall for these scams!

Here is a great and entertaining bit on these units.

This video may be for a car, but all modern fuel injection systems work in the same manner.

These things are put together to look like they are something of a computing unit.... They are not!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,691 Posts
TPS Adjustment Thread ***Same thing at No Cost

On MK-1 and MK-2 there has been much discussion on improving response, vaccuum hose mod and TPS rotation=better response. Very simple and at no cost, did it on my 07, changed to a awesome bike from one I considered selling.:surprise:

As per question below

http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/9-technical-discussion/1412-tps-adjustment.html?highlight=TPS

http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forum...5094-tps-setting-adjusting.html?highlight=TPS

http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forum...ce/661-new-vacuum-hose-mod.html?highlight=TPS
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,691 Posts
I am thinking about the vacuum line, I have adjusted main throttle and backed off to the low setting in the manual. FYI the capped vacuum line fittings have changed to 6 mm , I was able to buy 7/32 line at Parts Source and extended and capped off the lines at my Denali Compressor, so I can do a throttle body sync next time in 10 minutes, ( time to warm up and get all the test equipment hooked up). So after reading the posts about TPS and vacuum hose mod today, I would only need to cut one wire tie and insert one of my vacuum couplings, less than two minutes. I may try it tomorrow.

Also waiting to hear if anyone with a 2015 has exceeded the 1.005 VDC as stated in the manual for the main throttle sensor, without reducing fuel mileage. There are some earlier comments about the vacuum hose mod reducing engine braking. I did that mod on my 07, what I found was I was dumping raw fuel into the air while engine braking, I quickly removed that mod as I engine brake primarily then front , back brake is limited to light braking, or when both hands are on clutch and throttle. I am at a point where I just want to ride, no more mods of any kind, if there is a reduction in engine braking effect it won't be happening on my ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Another member (thanks!) sent me this link: http://www.mcnews.com/mcn/technical/BMWfuelmods_1213.pdf

MCN liked the function of the Booster Plug, and the other "easy-peesy" mod tested (they claim to have tested both for 1800 miles each). On the dyno they only mentioned peak HP, and the difference was negligeable (1 hp gain at peak with no losses mentioned, which is my main concern, tho I'd still like to see a stock vs. modified power curve comparison). They also mention an increase in mileage and a "noticeable" improvement in throttle response off idle. I don't really notice any serious "infractions" from my bike's EFI, but suspect the slight enrichening would smooth things out a bit, knowing all Japanese bikes come stupid-lean (at idle) from the factory (thanks EPA). Anyway, it's an interesting review of two products that claim to make good bikes a little better, not 650s into 1000s;) If I end up pulling the trigger on one of these, and I can convince the local shop with a dyno not to rape me on before and after runs (however unlikely), I'll post results.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,691 Posts
TPS setting 07-2014 Huge Difference

I have said it in previous posts, and when I have time I am going to ask to test my 07 that I sold and post the voltage readings . The difference in the tweaking of the TPS setting made a huge difference, everything is stock and in my opinion, the 07 has more get up and go with the setting change than my 2015 Versys.
The 2015 has a camshaft change and different mapping to increase HP and better gas mileage, my 07 got between 50 and 60 miles per gallon with the setting change, also was running a 16 tooth front sprocket.
My suggestion would be to try the TPS setting change, then if you think this device is worth investing in, buy it and post the findings, I fully expect to never hear anything positive about it or never hear anything as I think you will find it is a scam.JMHO
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,691 Posts
As I read the service manual for more inputs:


I found this post with a few images: https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/9-technical-discussion/19534-airbox-backfire.html

So I went down to give it a shot. I turned the sensor down/counter clockwise by a hair (to the left if facing the bike). Started her up. On cold start, the RPM went a bit crazy and shot up to 3k RPM and then settled back down. But something was amiss. I held the clutch and tried to get the bike to move and she just shut down. I think the fuelling was made even leaner?

So I went back down and turned the sensor the other way - up towards the fuel tank (to the right). Then I readjusted the idle to about 1400 rpm (up from 1300). Went up and down by street a few times, and seems like the problem's gone.

Either I'm daft, or Kawasaki has changed things on the 2015 model. I would like to believe I am daft.

However, when I release the clutch to get the bike going, the RPM goes below 1000 and the bike doesn't really move unless I give her a bit of gas. Is this normal?

Going to get out in the morning and start her up to see what next. Might just avoid the trip to the dealership.
I have played with my ( main throttle sensor)TPS, 2015, changing the setting above or below factory has zero results in performance,due to the closed loop oxygen sensor, feedback from crankcase pos. sensor, speed sensor and ECU mapping, however it does affect fuel mileage.

So here are my settings, July 2016

http://www.cycle-parts.com/Products/208319-57001-1538.aspx
I have the 57001-1538 adapter I have given numbers / referenced to colour codes of the manual pages 3-43 to 3-45 Fuel System.
#1-Brown Black
#2-Blue
#3-Yellow Red

Input 4.76 VDC using a fluke 189
WOT 4.04 VDC
Idle 1.031 VDC
Input VDC 5.018 VDC sensor measured 4.830 K ohms

Main throttle Sensor, 1 and 2= 4.898 K ohms
Input 5.018 VDC
Output 1 and 3 Idle 1.026 VDC warmed up and running, 4.238 VDC W.O.T motor off

Output 1&3 at temp but not running 1.0248 VDC


My new setting,August 2016, key only ( not running ) #1 & #3, 1.041VDC , W.O.T. 4.25 VDC I found my fuel mileage dropped

September 2016 changed to #1 & #3 to 0.99 VDC and left it there for the rest of the season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Hey guys! I'm a subscriber to a Youtuber named Andy Man Cam, a delightful English chap currently living in ye olde Deutschland! I quite enjoy his sense of humour and general outlook on life... He rides a 2007 V650! Makes sense!

Anyways, he has videos where he installs and reviews farkles... One mod he installed particularly interested me.. The booster plug and I was wondering if anyone on here has installed it?


Cheers for your thoughts and opinions!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,229 Posts
I have it and like it very much!

I have had it on my 2015 Versys 650 all summer.

I decided to purchase it after having read numerous positive reviews on other forums (UK Versys forum, ADV Rider forum, etc.).

The only negative posts that I have found about it is from people who have never tried it. IMHO these are therefore only opinions ... and I did not want to make my choice based on that.

Would I do it again? In a heartbeat!!! It does everything as described on the Boosterplug website. If you want more specific information, download the FI manual on the website. IMHO it is very well done. It gives an excellent explanation of motorcycle fuel injection.

Note: I have no association with Boosterplug. I'm just a satisfied "user". :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,229 Posts
Sounds good so far! Have you noticed a change in your fuel economy? I've heard anecdotally that while the plug injects more fuel, you actually see a small rise in fuel economy for reasons I don't feel like stressing my brain over at the moment.
I did not notice any change in the fuel economy. Apparently (as per other reviews) it is very similar.
However I must admit that fuel economy on any of my bikes has never been one of my priorities.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,691 Posts
Reluctant to Comment

First the video is not a MK-3 , the MK-3 has a oxygen sensor, really not sure if the video being a UK bike has the oxygen sensor or not. If it had then it would be closed loop the same as the MK-3, since I have done some research into this with the TPS, I can tell you that the huge change adjusting the North American version MK-1 and MK-2 TPS , only changes the fuel economy on the MK-3, no other difference.
I went and did a search, http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forum...hese-booster-plugs.html?highlight=boosterplug and no real definitive posting here either.
IMHO a change as has been suggested in this thread http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/162-general-discussions-v-650/203889-new-owner-hates-bike.html to the ECU would be a much better investment.What you get in the booster plug is a external temperature sensor and a scaled input to the ECU to indicate the air temperature is 20 'F cooler, so a sensor, a scaling resistor and some blocking diodes and possibly a chip set, with two plugs.Several ways of accomplishing this. One would be to install a sensor in parallel , scale it to reduce the input resistance value, the second would be to put it in series and scale it.
I just looked at the wiring diagram, identified as #41 , described service manual 3-53.From the manual:
Intake Air Temperature Sensor Resistance
Standard: 5.4 ∼ 6.6 kΩ @0°C (32°F)
0.290 ∼ 0.390 kΩ @80°C (176°F)
If the reading is out of the standard, replace the sensor
(see Intake Air Temperature Sensor Removal/Installation).
If the reading is within the standard, but the problem still
exists, replace the ECU (see ECU Removal/Installation).

As you can see, the warmer it is , the lower the resistance, that is, a increase in resistance = a lower temperature.

I just might experiment, total cost about $0.90
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
I have the boosterplug, have been using it for 3 days now. Fuel economy has gone up a bit but it does what it promises.
The biggest issue (only) i had with the bike is the digital behaviour of the trottle response. Slow driving has been a bitch because it really acts on and off, like there's hardly anything between the trottle position. So for me it takes off the really sharp edges of the bike. It made my commuting a lot more pleasant.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,691 Posts
I have the boosterplug, have been using it for 3 days now. Fuel economy has gone up a bit but it does what it promises.
The biggest issue (only) i had with the bike is the digital behaviour of the trottle response. Slow driving has been a bitch because it really acts on and off, like there's hardly anything between the trottle position. So for me it takes off the really sharp edges of the bike. It made my commuting a lot more pleasant.
Have you ever done the TPS adjustment that I and many others did? Also do you have a oxygen sensor in your bike, my understanding is it was introduced in the UK in 2010?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
I've had the BoosterPlug for about 6 months on my Gen2. I can say for sure that there is an improvement in throttle control. Almost exactly what Andy describes in his video is my experience. No more burning the clutch to keep smooth roll on the throttle around low speed corners.

However, I have recently noticed poor fuel economy. I don't know if its from the BoosterPlug or not. I really don't keep track of MPG's, especially in town commuting, which is most of my riding. Last weekend I rode over to eastern Oregon and back. I thought I would make the 220mi trip in one tank but was still 40mi from home and down to 1 gal left so I filled up. Turns out I was getting 44mpg. That seems low even with the kind of mountain riding I had done.

I say all that to say, I am going to do some testing and take some numbers with and without the BoosterPlug. Also I am right at 15K so I need to do the valves and sync the throttle bodies. If anything of interest comes up I will post what I find.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,691 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,588 Posts
I have had it on my 2015 Versys 650 all summer.

I decided to purchase it after having read numerous positive reviews on other forums (UK Versys forum, ADV Rider forum, etc.).

The only negative posts that I have found about it is from people who have never tried it. IMHO these are therefore only opinions ... and I did not want to make my choice based on that.

Would I do it again? In a heartbeat!!! It does everything as described on the Boosterplug website. If you want more specific information, download the FI manual on the website. IMHO it is very well done. It gives an excellent explanation of motorcycle fuel injection.

Note: I have no association with Boosterplug. I'm just a satisfied "user". :D
Where did you order it from (here in Canada?), and what did it cost?

First the video is not a MK-3 , the MK-3 has a oxygen sensor, really not sure if the video being a UK bike has the oxygen sensor or not....
I've been under the impression that ALL the "European" Vs are 'closed-loop'....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,229 Posts
I've had the BoosterPlug for about 6 months on my Gen2. I can say for sure that there is an improvement in throttle control. Almost exactly what Andy describes in his video is my experience. No more burning the clutch to keep smooth roll on the throttle around low speed corners.
On my Gen 3 Versys 650, even with a 44T rear sprocket, I can slowly release the clutch without touching the throttle and the bike will advance smoothly without any hiccups, etc. I also tested this while entering my garage where there is a slight uphill slope. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,691 Posts
Experiment Here We Come

First the video is not a MK-3 , the MK-3 has a oxygen sensor, really not sure if the video being a UK bike has the oxygen sensor or not. If it had then it would be closed loop the same as the MK-3, since I have done some research into this with the TPS, I can tell you that the huge change adjusting the North American version MK-1 and MK-2 TPS , only changes the fuel economy on the MK-3, no other difference.
I went and did a search, http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forum...hese-booster-plugs.html?highlight=boosterplug and no real definitive posting here either.
IMHO a change as has been suggested in this thread http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/162-general-discussions-v-650/203889-new-owner-hates-bike.html to the ECU would be a much better investment.What you get in the booster plug is a external temperature sensor and a scaled input to the ECU to indicate the air temperature is 20 'F cooler, so a sensor, a scaling resistor and some blocking diodes and possibly a chip set, with two plugs.Several ways of accomplishing this. One would be to install a sensor in parallel , scale it to reduce the input resistance value, the second would be to put it in series and scale it.
I just looked at the wiring diagram, identified as #41 , described service manual 3-53.From the manual:
Intake Air Temperature Sensor Resistance
Standard: 5.4 ∼ 6.6 kΩ @0°C (32°F)
0.290 ∼ 0.390 kΩ @80°C (176°F)
If the reading is out of the standard, replace the sensor
(see Intake Air Temperature Sensor Removal/Installation).
If the reading is within the standard, but the problem still
exists, replace the ECU (see ECU Removal/Installation).

As you can see, the warmer it is , the lower the resistance, that is, a increase in resistance = a lower temperature.

I just might experiment, total cost about $0.90
Not paying $149 for a $0.90 resistor I am going to assume the temperature sensor is linear. I have calculated that 1 degree F is = to 44 ohms, I am never going to be in a situation where the intake air is 176'F , even if I am idling, so I picked 155'F for a maximum value. I have noticed a marked improvement when the temperature is 60'F or less, pulls better, more responsive, I assumed it was the colder air expanding when heated in the combustion chamber. So I intend to drop the input temperature by 20 'F which is 876 ohms using a 1/4 watt resistor.
 
1 - 20 of 47 Posts
Top