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Discussion Starter #1
Being a 'potential owner' of a Versys, could I get better brake feel and better stopping power from replaceing the OEM pads w/ EBC pads, or changing out the rubber brake lines for stainless steel? I've also heard that flushing the OEM fluid for something stronger helps also. Any thoughts or suggestions in this matter? The braking system on the Versys is one of the three major factors that is keeping me from selling my Multistrada 620 and beomcing a Kawasaki owner.

Skeezix
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I believe someone on here swapped out for stainless steel lines, and said there was a substational amount of front end dive; could this be compensated for by playing with the front forks compression/rebound adjustments?
 

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That's not really related to the lines or pads, it's more how you ride. The suspension has a good deal of travel, so it does move around a bit more than some sportier bikes. I had added a bit of preload and increased the rebound damping on mine- you would have to tune the suspension to how you want it to ride.
 

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Lines give you more force per pull distance by not inflating so much. Pads actually give you more friction per force. Both are worthy.

Neither cause any functional change in the suspension... if the front dives more it's cause you are stopping harder.
 

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Looking for sources......

I want to do the upgrade, for sure pads, probably lines too. Anyone know where to get pads and lines; part numbers if possible. I understand the EBC pads are the same as those for the Ninja 650r - true? Thanks in advance.
 

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I checked the part numbers last night and you are correct. The V and 650R brakes are the same.
 

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The stock braking system is very good, it just doesn't give sensitive feedback. Braided lines will fix that. Changing the pads without changing the lines will give you more braking without helping the feedback problem, a bad combination IMO.

Start with the lines, you will get the most improvement out of them. The stock pads are quite good. You will discover how well the brakes are on this bike, just by changing lines.

Then when the stock pads need replacing, go ahead and get better performing pads.


As for dive, it has nothing to do with changing brakes or lines. And no, you should not use preload and damping to fix a dive problem, as that is not what these adjustments are designed to do.

To decrease fork dive, you have two options:
- Slightly increase the oil level in the forks. (as little as 1 ounce will make a noticeable improvement)
- Re-spring the forks. (a more expensive solution, but the better of the two)

Preload should be used to set the sag. The sag should be set somewhere in the 35-45mm range depending on how stiff a ride you desire.
Damping then should be adjusted so that the suspension moves up and down over bumps, but does not continue to move up and down after the bump. Most riders set this one by how the ride feels. Some suspension experts shoot for one oscillation after a bump, for a smooth ride, I like mine slightly stiffer than that for exceptional cornering.

FWIW the peload and damping settings from the factory are to high, making the bike ride harsh.
 

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The stock braking system is very good, it just doesn't give sensitive feedback. Braided lines will fix that. Changing the pads without changing the lines will give you more braking without helping the feedback problem, a bad combination IMO.

Start with the lines, you will get the most improvement out of them. The stock pads are quite good. You will discover how well the brakes are on this bike, just by changing lines.

Then when the stock pads need replacing, go ahead and get better performing pads.


As for dive, it has nothing to do with changing brakes or lines. And no, you should not use preload and damping to fix a dive problem, as that is not what these adjustments are designed to do.

To decrease fork dive, you have two options:
- Slightly increase the oil level in the forks. (as little as 1 ounce will make a noticeable improvement)
- Re-spring the forks. (a more expensive solution, but the better of the two)

Preload should be used to set the sag. The sag should be set somewhere in the 35-45mm range depending on how stiff a ride you desire.
Damping then should be adjusted so that the suspension moves up and down over bumps, but does not continue to move up and down after the bump. Most riders set this one by how the ride feels. Some suspension experts shoot for one oscillation after a bump, for a smooth ride, I like mine slightly stiffer than that for exceptional cornering.

FWIW the peload and damping settings from the factory are to high, making the bike ride harsh.
Can I ask a personal question? How much do you weigh? I find the front suspension a tad harsh on the factory settings too, and I weigh 220lbs. I haven't changed a thing on the bike from stock, other than backing off one notch on the rear preload.
 

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Can I ask a personal question? How much do you weigh? I find the front suspension a tad harsh on the factory settings too, and I weigh 220lbs. I haven't changed a thing on the bike from stock, other than backing off one notch on the rear preload.
I am the same weight and had left it at the stock settings for most of the summer. A friend of mine with a BWW that is thinking of buying a V, switched bikes for 10 miles or so the other day. He complained about the handling of my V. So on his advice, I stiffened the rear preload to the 2nd to the stiffest setting and a few clicks stiffer on the dampening for the rear. The front was stiffened 2 full turns preload and 1 click on dampening. What a HUGE difference! All along I had come to accept the handling as it was. Even though I thought it should be better. Well it is now! Don't accept the stock settings!
 

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Can I ask a personal question? How much do you weigh? I find the front suspension a tad harsh on the factory settings too, and I weigh 220lbs. I haven't changed a thing on the bike from stock, other than backing off one notch on the rear preload.
175 lbs.


But you need to take measurements. And set the preload that way. I set mine with givis installed.

I'm all the way out on the front. And one click from the softest on the rear.

The suspension should feel balanced. It shouldn't feel good on one end and stiff on the other. So even a suspension not set up for your weight will ride better if its either too stiff or too soft on front and back.
 

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Installed SS brake lines and I can really feel the difference in the front. Both have a firmer feel, but the back still locks up pretty easily. It is much easier to modulate the front brake. I may also try better pads. Any suggestions?
 

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I got mine here (http://www.bluestreakracing.ca/). Ordered the Ninja 650R lines since they have the same part numbers on the Kawi parts list. I actually put the banjo bolt in the front master cylinder and ran the lines directly to the calipers and removed all of the lines from the front fender.
 

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Got mine from Blue streak as well :) Hey Sharrison did your lines fit okay ?? I found mine to be a little tight so I contacted Bluestreak And talked to Tony the owner & he,s going to make me a set thats about 3 " longer . I think the kit was intended for the Nija 650 but the versys has a little longer legs . I have bought a lot from Bluestreak and they a great to deal with :thumb:
 

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They are a bit snug, but they went on ok. There is no slack.
 
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