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The manual says to use the side stand when measuring chain slack, but in looking over some threads here, I see some people use a rear stand for this. I have the use of a rear stand and it would make finding the tight spot for the chain easier than having to roll the bike back and forth. Will I get an accurate reading using a rear stand? Is there an adjustment in the measurement I need to add in for it to be accurate?
I recently changed the rear shock preset to allow more travel in the swing arm and am concerned that this may have made the chain more loose.
 

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The manual says to use the side stand when measuring chain slack, but in looking over some threads here, I see some people use a rear stand for this. I have the use of a rear stand and it would make finding the tight spot for the chain easier than having to roll the bike back and forth. Will I get an accurate reading using a rear stand? Is there an adjustment in the measurement I need to add in for it to be accurate?
I recently changed the rear shock preset to allow more travel in the swing arm and am concerned that this may have made the chain more loose.
I check mine on a rear stand, which puts the weight onto the axle, pretty much the same as on the stand, weight on the tire VIA the axle. No adjustment necessary, as long as the bike's weight is on the stand.

All bets are OFF if you found a way to jack the bike w/ the rear wheel hanging free.

I wouldn't worry about pre-load changing anything enough to worry about.
 

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Per the manual I always verify chain tension on the side stand and make any adjustments on the rear. Only after the chain tension is correct will I cotter pin the axle bolt.
 

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The 2007 service manual actually specifies using the centerstand, which we don't have... Do it on a rear stand, but be aware that the chain tension specs are with rear suspension fully extended. Depending on your rear spring and preload setting, it may be at close to fully extended, or fully extended. You can easily verify by raising rear end to have it fully extended for measurement consistency.
 
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