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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
A few years ago I bought a low mileage 2013 650. Didn't notice at purchase but some time later noticed a slight bend in the stock handlebars & some plastic trim that may have been replaced. Bike was probably down at some point & this may be relevant to my question.
When getting a nice alignment on the sprockets/chain, the bike has a significant pull to the left at speed on a level surface. When aligning to ride nice & straight I get faster wear on the rear sprocket & probably the chain. I'm keeping the bike for a while so wondering which alignment method you folks would recommend??? I do ride hard through hard curves in the mountains most of the time if that matters.
I've rebuilt the front forks and looked hard for any tweaks in the tubes or triple trees, nothing remotely obvious there. Been through a few tires so far; rims, swingarm, bearings & axle all look good also.
Appreciate any opinions on preferred alignment.
 

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laser or Motion Pro sprocket/chain/wheel alignment, start there, the swingarm index marks might get you close, but not perfect.
 

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I wonder IF your frame is "tweaked"? When I had the lowside that caused my '09 to become an insurance write-off, on the ride home from Inuvik, NWT, I definitely had the bike 'pulling'. Looking at my sprockets, rear-brake rotor, etc, I saw these issues: (look at the 'wear-patterns' on the disc)

P6272417 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

P6272416 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

as well as the tire's 'wear-patterns':

P6272414 copy by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

and here's the disc as I arrived at home.

P6262410 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

In this pic you can see that the bike was QUITE tweaked!

P6242361 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr
 

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it takes a very hard hit to bend the main frame on that generation Versys, a relatively low speed flop on a gravel road is unlikely to do it. subframe, swingarm, wheel, yeah, it's possible to tweak those.
 

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Hello,
A few years ago I bought a low mileage 2013 650. Didn't notice at purchase but some time later noticed a slight bend in the stock handlebars & some plastic trim that may have been replaced. Bike was probably down at some point & this may be relevant to my question.
When getting a nice alignment on the sprockets/chain, the bike has a significant pull to the left at speed on a level surface. When aligning to ride nice & straight I get faster wear on the rear sprocket & probably the chain. I'm keeping the bike for a while so wondering which alignment method you folks would recommend??? I do ride hard through hard curves in the mountains most of the time if that matters.
I've rebuilt the front forks and looked hard for any tweaks in the tubes or triple trees, nothing remotely obvious there. Been through a few tires so far; rims, swingarm, bearings & axle all look good also.
Appreciate any opinions on preferred alignment.
To properly align wheels and chain, you have to go through the following procedure once to ascertain your problem area.

Slope Rectangle Parallel Font Symmetry


Wheel alignment should be checked first & any issues resolved, this gives you a solid & correct base for sorting out your chain alignment

Firstly, with the chain slack, measure from the swing arm pivot to the rear wheel spindle on each side and make them equal.
That will prove if the alignment marks are correct or not.
(You only have to do this once unless you take the swingarm out for some reason).

Then you should find, using the plank or string method, that your front and rear wheels align.
If not then you have a twisted frame / forks.

Then adjust the chain slack to the recommended measurement.

If the above is ok, but then you now find the chain / sprocket do not line up (using a tool such as the promotion tool), this indicates that you have a twisted sprocket alignment or a transverse sprocket misalignment.

White Rectangle Line Font Parallel


A transverse sprocket misalignment means that the sprockets are running parallel to but not in alignment
This can be solved by using shims at the rear or front sprockets to align them properly.

A twisted sprocket alignment means that the engine is twisted in the frame.
This can be solved by shimming the engine at its mounting points.
This usually occurs if you have disturbed the engine mounting points at any time by having the engine out or even when crash-bars are fitted and the wrong engine to frame mounting bolt tightening sequence is not followed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow Fasteddie, that's a heck of a tweak!
My index marks have always been a good 5/8's of a mark different from each-other after using the motion pro tool. Other then that, everything appears good; however, I never checked for true alignment of the wheels & sprockets. If either of them are off it sounds like a major problem.
Thank you, I'll look into these Towerman
 
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