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Discussion Starter #1
I am not happy with the power of the front brake. Especially, when braking on high speed, it takes the bike too long to stop. Braking is safety. Fitting 11mm master cylinder (from Rebel 300), made a definite improvement, as the stock one feels like pressing on wood. Still, it is far from where I would want it to be. Changing brake pads to Brembo made some improvement but not enough. I am a kind of perfectionist as far as brakes are concerned. For instance, in Versys 1000, I changed the rotors, fitted Brembo radial calipers, and Brembo radial MC. It is perfect now. The stopping power is enormous and yet there is the feel and enough softness to the braking. So coming back to V3, the only thing that I can think of as being flawed is the front rotor. I found only one company that is making it, and they do make great stuff. this rotor is fully floating.
galfer.jpg
 

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Stainless lines if available. Doubt a rotor change for one of the same diameter will make much difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Stainless lines if available. Doubt a rotor change for one of the same diameter will make much difference.
I ordered this one, so will let you know. They did make a noticeable difference in my Versys 1000. Manufacturing a rotor is actually a complicated science. Bikers talk a lot of the brake pads having or not having a proper bite, but the rotor has to provide as well enough friction, or else the pads are just sliding on it. Some of this friction comes from the residues of the brake pads sticking on the rotor, called adherent friction. The other type of friction relates to the bite of the pads and how the rotor responds as they both wear and produce heat (abrasive friction). I have almost an identical caliper on KLX230 which has a much smaller rotor, and the braking in it is amazing; of course, it is a lighter bike, but irrespectively of it, it has still much superior braking power to V3. Anyway, to make a light bike heavier, one can just take a pillion and do a braking test.
 

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From an engineering perspective if you can't increase the diameter, being as a brake rotor is pretty much always acting dynamically and not statically, surface area engaged between the pad and the rotor, friction (be that adherent or abrasive) between the pad and the rotor, and pressure applied will be how you make it stop faster. It probably won't be an issue I'm sure but the non-uniform nature of that rotor throws me off a bit I feel like it would heat up/cool down quicker by the big holes and slower by the small holes which seems like an odd design choice. A more uniform pattern would make me feel more comfortable personally, like solid rotors or uniform holes. The only galfer products I have ever purchased are stainless lines but they are beautiful, I imagine they know what they are doing. I normally try to use EBC for friction items and have always been pleased. Aren't the sintered pads found on most street going motorcycles basically straight abrasive? I do agree the Versys-X brakes are a touch underwhelming I would by no means call them bad but I'd like to see a little more bite up front as well.

Be sure to test before and after! Like actually measure it or you'll never know for sure. Interested to see the results.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok, so I fitted the Galfer rotor. It is a piece of art, and it is fully floating. Theoretically, the floating rotors go better with solid calipers, but they work as good with floating ones. Anyway, I am in the process of breaking it in, taking care not to overheat the rotor. Still, only after a couple of rides, I can definitely say that the difference is HUGE. I was right that the weak link in the V3 braking system is the rotor. Afterall there are not so many variables. Master cylinder I have already changed; the steel brake lines help just a little but are not the major factor; I already tried Brembo brake pads, and the caliper is just a standard one and should work as intended. I did install the Galfer ceramic brake pads, but I doubt that it is what made the main difference. Now, the front brake is finally responsive, and I can stop the bike almost immediately in high speed, and this is before the pads and the rotor is fully broken in. These guys know what they are doing!
galfer rotor.jpg
 

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It's kind of a shame you changed both pads and rotor at the same time. Well never know which made the difference lol.

Glad you are happy with it though, looks good!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
the reason I did not use the old pads was that one should ideally use new pads with the new rotor, or else the adherent friction created would be one of the old pads. Anyway, to be sure, I just rode my friend's versys, that has Brembo pads, and there was no bite, the pads were just sliding over the rotor. To be safe, I had to use both brakes at the same time (one should do it anyway, but you know what I mean). I have actually hardly avoided an accident the other day riding my bike, when a truck suddenly pulled in front of me, when I was riding over 100km/h; the front brake simply refused to properly respond, so I had to press it really hard, while at the rear the ABS engaged. I am maybe a bit obsessive with brakes, but they are after all an important safety assurance.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
my friend after riding my bike said that it brakes like 30 or 40 or even 50% stronger than hers. if the Galfer brake pads contribute to it, or how much they contribute, can be only tested if someone tries them. But they are twice as expensive as the Brembo ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
now, I am using Magura 12mm. My friend is having 11mm MC. I thought of switching to 11mm, but with Galfer rotor, the 12mm seems to perform just right, so for now I stay with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Now that I think of it because there is higher friction in the rotor, less force is required, and 12mm MC can do its job easily. In my friend's bike, one has to press really hard to stop the bike at high speeds, so 11mm is better. According to hydraulic law, the smaller the piston in MC, the less force is required to push the brake fluid through the hose.
 

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I still have to say my theory is that the rotor didn't do much to anything. The coefficient of friction of the rotor is that of stainless steel just like every other brake rotor. I mean it likely camr with some nice cross hatch scored in brand new on arrival (just like a brand new stock rotor) that changed the surface roughness for the first ten minutes but once all that stuff fills up with "adherent brake material" I can't see it making any difference. What is one stainless steel disc to another? Diameter didn't change and material didn't change, there shouldn't be a difference. My money is on the pads.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
EBC promises 15% increase of friction on their rotors, so there must be some logic behind their claims. I don't have good experience with their pads though. I noticed some of them chipped in some of my bikes. I am not an expert on rotors, and metallurgy, so I cannot really say how these rotors are any different other than having a different shape and being the floating type. I reckon the only way to verify if the pads are the major contributing factor is if someone tries them on the OEM rotor. They are 69usd though. https://galferusa.com/product/kawasaki-2017-versys-x-300-front-brake-pads-fd266g1375

I can just say that the braking power in our Versys is ridiculous; it is actually unsafe. I have Vulcan S, and KLX 230 from Kawa and they both brake great, and one can easily lock the front wheel. The KLX has the stock pads and a very mall rotor. So through the process of elimination, after trying already the Brembo pads, in my mind only the rotor remains on the list of what could be wrong. And since my friend here has V3, I could verify that the issue is not just with my particular bike.
 

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Do you have ABS? I do, my bike stops fantastic. I can't lock the front up (or I haven't tried to I guess) but I don't presume to be able to. My other bikes would lock their brakes on the spot front and back but every "almost accident" I've ever been in (that was my fault not someone else's) was because I locked my brakes up.

The only way to really show it is to do a series of experiments. I can't believe I can't find any on the internet... There are a thousand different Dyno run studies of what a cold air intake or muffler does to HP but nobody has done brake rotor types/brands, if they have I can't find it...

You definitely aren't allowed to (in science) change two things and come to a conclusion about either. I understand why you did I would have done the same I would just really like to see some proof. It would make a great YouTube video that would probably get a 100k views if someone wanted to spend $5000 on parts and test equipment lol. Probably why nobody has done it.

To increase the friction they'd had to change the material or surface roughness. The surface roughness will smooth out with time I would imagine and the gains will fade away, increased friction otherwise from a rotor? Maybe some sort of impregnated surface with bits of some other metal in it? Maybe but doing that would weaken the rotor.

I'm honestly just curious on the science behind this.
 
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