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Rained most of the night and sunny today. It was just too pretty not to take a short ride.

The air quality has been total crap for the last 2 months or more, but today was pristine. Bright blue sky with big white puffies.

Deep breath thru the nose and no dusty smokey smell and unlimited visibility.

Great photo day as well.
 

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Yes, Here in SoCal I listened to the rain running off the roof all night. No riding though. Stayed in bed till 2 in the afternoon. Got up so the little woman could give me a hair cut. Then she cooked while i watched football...It was a great day
 

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Not all that good a day yesterday.....went out with the in-laws for dinner (that was good). Got some bad news that one of our friends from our Washington days had passed away, and then this AM found out that my last remaining uncle had passed last night. Old age sucks.....
 

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Does that mean that some of the fire affected areas got rain??
Yes! We finally got our first real rain in many months and the fires have been contained, the smoke has cleared and we can breath clean air again!

The poor people from Paradise, who have lost everything are still in great need and many are homeless and will need years to recover from this tragedy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We did not have any fires in my area but we sure did get lots of smoke from the fires up north.

Last summer we rode thru the area just to the south of Paradise on High Way 70 Feather River Scenic Parkway. Such a beautiful area, very sad so many folks got wiped out or lost their lives.

Hopefully we can return to sane forestry management as we used to do decades ago. We had fires back then but they did not blow up into fire bombs as they do today.
 

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The scenes from the Paradise fire were scary and the aftermath is heart breaking. So many people still unaccounted for,thank you to the fire-fighters and all the front line workers. Here up the coast in western Canada we also have had a big increase in forest fires,every year now like clockwork.The last 5 years or so have produced summer drought- like conditions in the hottest time of the year and once you get away from the ocean it can get very hot.The days are long here in the summer. A lot of fires are caused by humans but ironically when a little rain comes to quash the fire its hot so you get lightning strikes which cause more fires. Here we are having the same discussions,more controlled burns,cleaning the floor of dead trees from the pine beetle and fuel, looking for any kind of edge. Theres a lot of trees in the west here and logging and forest management is a big part of it. In the natural cycle of forests, fire plays an important role in regenerating life. But more and more of the planets population is spreading out to live in more remote areas.And as we civilize we take down trees,basically shade which we need but what dangerously burns in a fire.The more trees you lose,the hotter it gets there next year and adds to the big picture. In a strange bitter twist smoky skies help to cool but take away sunlight for agriculture in our shorter growing season.So, theres no doubt the earth is in a warming phase and whether we are causing it or helping it along is the great debate. Above my pay grade. The Sahara was once green and Alaska was once the tropics,things can change. I personally defer to our scientists as to how we can try to control the present.In the meantime,how do we deal with the ensuing destruction? Maybe So Cal once had great forests like the the Pacific Northwest. And at this rate,maybe B.C. will look like So Cal in the future.
 

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I was just reading an article in Popular Science which details what's going on. The U.S. Forest Service estimated in 2015 that climate change has led to fire seasons that are on average 78 days longer than they were almost 40 years ago! If Northern California had received anywhere near the typical amount of autumn precipitation this year (around 4-5 in. of rain near Camp Fire point of origin), explosive fire behavior & stunning tragedy in Paradise would almost certainly not have occurred.

Also, public lands are actually federally managed, and the article goes on to say that California is actually a leader in private lands Forest management. My son lives in such an area and is required to keep brush cleared and is inspected yearly and is subject to fines if in non compliance.

It seems like we are waiting longer each year for the rainy season to start. It was two weeks late for the folks in Paradise :(
 
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