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Discussion Starter #1
Dear all

As having a flat is no rare event for me, I am looking at ways if putting tubeless tires on the Versys the next time I change them. I have read the sticky thread for converting the spoked wheels on the X-300 to accommodate tubeless tires but I wasn't really convinced that it's a fail safe option, especially after all the info floating around that 19 inch tires don't have a bead for sealing. So the next option is to find cast wheels. I will be using the bike solely on tarmac, so I am not really afraid of beating the wheels on off road trips.

Does anybody know of any manufacturer that sells cast wheels for the bike? or maybe getting wheels from other Kawasaki bikes that are for tubeless tires?

I have not totally written of the idea of converting the existing spoked wheels but I haven't seen anybody doing it to this specific wheel set and I don't like the idea of having the wheels off the bike for a long period of time in order to complete the conversion.

Thanks
 

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You might be able to swap the rear wheel for one off a ninja 300 abs. Looks like it might work, but until someone tries it, its hard to know. You would have to make sure the sprocket and brake rotor lines up, check widths, axle, all that fun stuff. In theory you could do the same with the front, but that could be more complicated, not to mention the different wheel size.

I can't think of any one specifically making cast wheels for the little versys, you might have better luck having one of the various high end spoked wheel makers putting together a tubeless set up.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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ABS / Not ABS

Dear all

As having a flat is no rare event for me, I am looking at ways if putting tubeless tires on the Versys the next time I change them. I have read the sticky thread for converting the spoked wheels on the X-300 to accommodate tubeless tires but I wasn't really convinced that it's a fail safe option, especially after all the info floating around that 19 inch tires don't have a bead for sealing. So the next option is to find cast wheels. I will be using the bike solely on tarmac, so I am not really afraid of beating the wheels on off road trips.

Does anybody know of any manufacturer that sells cast wheels for the bike? or maybe getting wheels from other Kawasaki bikes that are for tubeless tires?

I have not totally written of the idea of converting the existing spoked wheels but I haven't seen anybody doing it to this specific wheel set and I don't like the idea of having the wheels off the bike for a long period of time in order to complete the conversion.

Thanks
One deciding factor is in the title, if you follow the posts about sprocket change, you will find numerous posts about problems. Before I would attempt what you are thinking, I would find a different bike. Although this brings back memories of my DRZ400S and the street version DRZ400SM , who knows , maybe Kawi sees enough demand to provide that option down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So, at the moment it seems like a dead end. I've no intention of switching to another bike, nor change the wheels size. It does all I want and does it well. Let alone that it only has a few hundred kms on the dash. My only gripe is the tubed tires. So maybe somebody offers cast wheels in the future (or a really tried and tested conversion kit makes it in the market).

Thanks for the suggestions
 

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I can't help you w/ brand-name, but I KNOW that there are several manufacturers that make a 'tube-replacement' for dirt-bikes, that look like several 'sausages' of some foam-like material, put in w/out air necessary.

Sorry I can't give you their name.
 

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I'm just going to convert to Michelin Ultra Heavy Duty Tubes at the first tire change. A lot easier, especially since I'm going to pay someone else to mount them!

The rears can be sent off to be sealed because they have a safety bead. Woody's Wheel Works can do it. Not too expensive, IIRC. Woody's can make a front wheel that has the spokes mounted on a ridge in the center of the tire, thereby making it air tight. Of course, it has a safety bead. This is over $1,000 plus shipping to Colorado. They have to lace the wheel on your hub. These are the only way to get tubeless wheels that I know of, and I've been poking around on the internet researching this for a while.

If you want to try to do the rears yourself, find Tewster2's build of his DR650 on ADV rider. He has pictures and a full explanation. he took the bike to Alsaka, and as far as I know, they held air the whole time. He left the front tube because of the cost of buying a new rim, and the front tube is a lot easier to patch.

I think UHD tubes will work for me.
 

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I can't help you w/ brand-name, but I KNOW that there are several manufacturers that make a 'tube-replacement' for dirt-bikes, that look like several 'sausages' of some foam-like material, put in w/out air necessary.

Sorry I can't give you their name.
They are called "Bib Mousse" tubes. A compressible rubber tube that has a built-in pressure equivalent. Most are designed for dirt bikes and so may be too "soft" for high speed running. Here is a 19". There are plenty of 21" and 18" versions, but I stopped looking before finding a 17".

https://www.ebay.com/itm/NeuTech-Nitromousse-Mousse-Bib-110-90-19-120-80-19-19-N19-280-Bibs-NEW-NO-FLATS-/232218363959

I saw them trialed once years back at a hare scramble. The rear could not take the heat generated by racing over very bumpy terrain and broke down. Rubber sawdust everywhere. The design and materials used today are probably much improved.
 
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For what it's worth, the dealerships in Vietnam offered the X-300 with an upgrade kit. This kit included crash bars, Tun LED fogs, Givi panniers and a set of tubeless tires on the stock wheels. I know they sold a bunch and people were happy with the tires (50/50 tires).

When it's time to change the tires, I'll definitely go tubeless.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
For what it's worth, the dealerships in Vietnam offered the X-300 with an upgrade kit. This kit included crash bars, Tun LED fogs, Givi panniers and a set of tubeless tires on the stock wheels. I know they sold a bunch and people were happy with the tires (50/50 tires).

When it's time to change the tires, I'll definitely go tubeless.
You can't put tubeless tires on the stock wheels without converting the wheels somehow. If they use tubes with tubeless tires they cannot avoid quick deflation in case of a puncture. I cannot find a reason to do what they propose. Unless it's just for offering a wider range of tires to choose from.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yes, I've read the sticky before posting this and I have my reservations as to whether the conversion will be safe for the front wheel since I cannot verify that it has a safety bead. I guess I will have to take a look at it when I change tires for the first time and decide if it's OK to make the conversion.
 

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The Outex system must be reasonable as Woody's use that system on their Excel tubeless wheel conversions.
"We now seal the Excel rims for tubeless using the Outex tape system. There are no guarantees on the longevity of the seal".

That is surely a good sign.
 

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I ended up just going to an Outex conversion combined with a FOBO tire pressure monitoring system. It has held pressure all winter. I can check the bikes air pressure from my living room couch!
 

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I ordered the OUTEX system and took it to the dealer.

They tried it (?) and said it would not hold pressure.
I have the Michelin Anakees on now. Observation, they seem
like a 'heavy' tire. 300 is less twitchy than with the stock tires.

FastEddie's modification with the 3M goop would be the way to go, IMO.
I don't want to get into all the tire changing equipment, so its a no go for me.

I prefer tubeless because you can do a roadside patch, more choices for tires.
I run 90% on hard surface.
 

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...FastEddie's modification with the 3M goop would be the way to go, IMO.
I don't want to get into all the tire changing equipment, so its a no go for me.

I prefer tubeless because you can do a roadside patch, more choices for tires.
I run 90% on hard surface.
I "did" the wheel modification on my KLR after helping a chum fix a flat on HIS KLR, and realizing that I'd MUCH rather put in a plug than to kneel in the mud w/ the "PIG" on its side to get the wheel off, and then repair the tube!

:surprise:
 

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I ordered the OUTEX system and took it to the dealer.

They tried it (?) and said it would not hold pressure.
I have the Michelin Anakees on now. Observation, they seem
like a 'heavy' tire. 300 is less twitchy than with the stock tires.

FastEddie's modification with the 3M goop would be the way to go, IMO.
I don't want to get into all the tire changing equipment, so its a no go for me.

I prefer tubeless because you can do a roadside patch, more choices for tires.
I run 90% on hard surface.
as I mentioned in another thread, I converted the wheel to tubeless by using GOOP. super easy. And the rear wheel does have safety beads (not that important). However, the spokes in Versys have large openings in the middle, so one has to pay attention to seal them properly. I was very surprised when I noticed that some spokes were leaking from the end of the nipple, not from the side as it usually happens.
 

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and just to clarify, the front rim does not have safety beads. I cannot see how it is a problem. it seals just fine. as much as cast wheels have their advantages, they are able to take much less abuse as the spoke wheels. for instance, I noticed that my front cast wheel in the Tiger 800 got damaged, just by riding on a regular road!
 

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The absence of a front safety bead isn't important unless the tire gets low, you don't notice it and it rolls off the rim. That's why I think a TPMS is essential when going tubeless on this bike.
 
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