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After an unfortunate incident on my way home from work one day I'm in need of some repair advice from the community. I hit a culvert which resulted in a bent from rim, bent handlebars, a crack at the base of the handlebar clamp, and a crack clean through the upper triple clamp.

This is the damage I can see. These parts can be replaced no problem. However, I'm nervous about the possibility that I may have damaged the forks or the frame in a way that is not obvious to the naked eye. I change my own oil but I'm no mechanic. I've taken all the body work off to check over the frame as best I can. I see no bends or cracks. I look at the forks and they seem straight and parallel, but doubt my own expertise. I've ridden the bike up and down the street in front of my house and other than the bumps from the flat spot in the rim it seems to track straight and true.

So, is there a more accurate and reliable way to test my forks/frame outside of taking it to the shop?
 

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Something to check also.....If you put the bike on a rear stand with the wheel straight. Check if your windscreen is tilted to one side or the other. If it is you have a bent inner cowling bracket. Simple to replace. I had to replace mine when i got hit by a car.
 

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I doubt the frame is damaged...

But I'd replace both triple trees, the lower one might be tweaked And the forks? I'd disassemble both to check if they are straight. Without disassembling you can't tell if the slider is straight and it might bind.

The wheel is not that bad, I've had worse damage from potholes.
 

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The wheel is not that bad, I've had worse damage from potholes.
The usd forks are made for off road so they are stronger by design, and if Tod is experienced with worse wheel bends, your forks should be all right. If forks are straight and no oil leaks, it looks like grass on the fork ends and no hard metal impact - so those would be all good signs. A fork oil change may be a good idea later to inspect parts.

A way to check the alignment is to tape string on both sides of the wheels from to back and get down and look. Once aligned, look at bars, etc.. to verify what else is twisted or bent (AL handlebars - I've already replaced mine once :surprise:

When you get it back on the road, hopefully there is a mag wheel straightening shop near you. The triple clamps and maybe steering head bearings are not free, but you were lucky, considering the impacts your bike absorbed.

I hope you are all right though. You can always fix your bike.
 

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I am not horribly experienced either, but I just replaced my right fork oil seal. I would think that, if the forks are holding their oil, they are not too damaged.

Then again, someone on the forum with more experience may tell us about why my gauge of a good fork is insufficient.

Good luck.
 

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Tod,

Evidently you don't know about strength of materials. Telescopic forks were big in the 1960's because they were so light, but since then the lower aluminum fork legs have been exploding on impact, especially on off-road applications. USD forks were made initially for off road bikes because the steel at the lower end, at the point of impact, was much stronger with much less damage on fork impacts. The AL at the top of the forks is leveraged and away from the force impact. Proportionally with strength also comes handling stability with the new design for street riders as well.

First you try to get people killed from your lack of knowledge of brake pad materials (slick/hard steel bit pads vs. softer more abrasive copper bit pads), and now you have absolutely no knowledge of forks (absolutely nothing): both are invested in materials engineering in the last half century. Your Mexican high school education is not paying off in the dividends you 'imagine'.
 

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Tod,

Evidently you don't know about strength of materials. Telescopic forks were big in the 1960's because they were so light, but since then the lower aluminum fork legs have been exploding on impact, especially on off-road applications. USD forks were made initially for off road bikes because the steel at the lower end, at the point of impact, was much stronger with much less damage on fork impacts. The AL at the top of the forks is leveraged and away from the force impact. Proportionally with strength also comes handling stability with the new design for street riders as well.

First you try to get people killed from your lack of knowledge of brake pad materials (slick/hard steel bit pads vs. softer more abrasive copper bit pads), and now you have absolutely no knowledge of forks (absolutely nothing): both are invested in materials engineering in the last half century. Your Mexican high school education is not paying off in the dividends you 'imagine'.


bitch-slap by weljo2001, on Flickr
 

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USD forks were made initially for off road bikes because the steel at the lower end, at the point of impact, was much stronger with much less damage on fork impacts.
So just the fact that the forks on my GSX-R are USD makes them off road forks? Don't you think that other factors like, say, geometry, travel, spring rate, valving, materials, slider diameter, bushing sizes, etc. could also be in play?

First you try to get people killed from your lack of knowledge of brake pad materials (slick/hard steel bit pads vs. softer more abrasive copper bit pads)
You still haven't noticed that your Godsent EBC HH pads are just... HH pads? They are nothing special, they are just regular HH pads and EBC has been using the same compound for over 20 years.

, and now you have absolutely no knowledge of forks (absolutely nothing): both are invested in materials engineering in the last half century.
Says the guy that thinks all USD forks are off road worthy. :|


Your Mexican high school education is not paying off in the dividends you 'imagine'.
You're so full of knowledge that you had to end your post with a racist remark?
 

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kyb twin cham. using diffrent w oils - Suspension - ThumperTalk

The post by SC_Spode reveals the REAL inventor of USD or inverted forks, Steve Simons, who made off road suspension (illustrated post dated 10-06-2006, 12:40pm.) Offsprung weight makes sense and is Wiki's unsourced explanation. The author of the post above who was an expert racer at the time had similar explanations of rigidity and consistent dampening. I know even Japan's best telescopic fork ends were exploding up until 2003 on BMW F650 GS models which was HUGE legal liabilities for OEM's. Everyone expects off road shocks to bust, but not the street which was happening with heavier 4 stroke machines. It WAS pretty much all off road until the big 4 started them in 1989. Suzuki did win a 1982 World championship (bike pic below):



So going from lighter 2 stroke machines to heavier 4 stroke machines also was a factor in the big 4's ultimate decision to migrate toward USD forks. But they DO make a difference: I did not believe how much until I rode my Vs. 650 the first time. I'm never going back!

MOST all major innovations in vehicles come from extreme sports:
drag racing and/or off-road racing. Those are the guys and gals who are pushing the boundaries.
 

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Süsser Tod was the first to instigate... Besides, you won't find an aftermarket crossbrace for USD forks.

Have you removed your front fender for a better visual and assessment? In which direction was the impact sustained?
 

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question the kawdog general lack of knowledge and expertise on all moto subjects and this is what you get, the internet bully boy response, in this case, the racist bully boy response. kawdog was told by the moderators recently to stop posting these attacks, i guess he didn't get the message.

i'll stick with the knowledge base of our forum friend from Mexico, he knows motos, and leave the kawdog and his "offsprung weight" in his own small-minded world.
JD,

You have too many problems for me to speculate about. Your two run-on sentences only have the periods correct: the rest is pretty much pure bs rationalized by more pure bs. At least you are consistent though.

I hope you are not flooded now.


Have a nice day!
 

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While you have the plastics off, check the frame for chipped or cracked paint, that's a good way to tell if it has any "aftermarket" bends.
 
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