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Discussion Starter #1
While changing my tire yesterday, the bike somehow slipped off of my front stand and the front fell on top of the tire (the axle was not inserted yet). This accident cracked my front fender, but I do not notice any other damage. Should I be worried about anything with the forks or front suspension since it abruptly fell? Also, the bike has been just resting on the rear stand and with the front forks on the ground. I can not figure out how to get it up and change the tire now that it’s off the stand. Is there any damage that might occur from the forks holding the weight of the front end on the ground?
 

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To me the safest way to get it back up would be to borrow or rent an engine hoist.
Possibly using a nylon sling around the steering head as a lifting point.
The next thing I would do would be to invest in a front lift that uses the steering head like a pit bull or t-rex.
 

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Is there any damage that might occur from the forks holding the weight of the front end on the ground?
nope, get a couple buddies over there, lift it up and shove the stand back under it. alternately, put a low profile automotive style scissor jack under the motor and jack it up, use a block of wood between the jack pad and motor. no big deal.
 

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You might look at SOMETHING in your ceiling as an additional "holding point" for NEXT time you do this, perhaps the attaching points for the garage-door opener. Check this pic.

forks off:stem stand copy by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

I used "tie-downs" up to the opener mounts.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You might look at SOMETHING in your ceiling as an additional "holding point" for NEXT time you do this, perhaps the attaching points for the garage-door opener. Check this pic.

forks off:stem stand copy by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

I used "tie-downs" up to the opener mounts.
Where are the opener mounts? I live in an RV, however I have something on the back Where I could use a heavy duty ratchet strap while it’s still docked on the rear wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
With no axle inserted, is it normal for me to be able to twist (or turn) the bottom black part of the fork? I can rotate it around the cylinder since the axle is not there to keep it in place.
 

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I would buy a few 2x4, build a 6-7' tall saw horse, maybe 3' wide at the top beam. No need to spread legs too much, just enough to clear the handlebar and prevent the rear stand from rolling.

Then with a 400+ lbs ratchet strap, lift at the stem.
Should be easy to disassemble when done, takes little place.
 

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nope, get a couple buddies over there, lift it up and shove the stand back under it. alternately, put a low profile automotive style scissor jack under the motor and jack it up, use a block of wood between the jack pad and motor. no big deal.
Scissor jacks work great. I use them to raise bikes that are on my work stand. I would go with your scissor jack suggestion.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Good suggestions, friends! I will be working on it tomorrow. Here is a picture of it currently. I guess my only fear at this point is if one of the forks got bent. It doesn’t look like it though.
180921
 

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While changing my tire yesterday, the bike somehow slipped off of my front stand and the front fell on top of the tire (the axle was not inserted yet). This accident cracked my front fender, but I do not notice any other damage. Should I be worried about anything with the forks or front suspension since it abruptly fell? Also, the bike has been just resting on the rear stand and with the front forks on the ground. I can not figure out how to get it up and change the tire now that it’s off the stand. Is there any damage that might occur from the forks holding the weight of the front end on the ground?
It will slip off again if you put it under the fork axle mounts because there is only one spring for compression in only one side which is the left side!!!!! The other side is the Rebound side and has no spring so it will collapse as soon as you take the axle out. Make sure you use a triple tree support stand. Look at number 44026, that is the compression spring.
180923
 

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It will slip off again if you put it under the fork axle mounts
Nah, I've done it loads of times on my Mk3 and it never slipped, tilted or even became unstable.
An under-tree stand is probably the best way to do it though. Wish I had one.

As for whether to expect damage - the suspension is probably sturdy enough to take on those couple of inches of free fall if it can survive landings from wheelies. Afterwards, just laying there does not cause more stress than if there was a wheel between the legs, the weight load is the same. Inspect whether there are oil leaks from fork seals and, once you lift the bike, whether nothing broke underneath the axle clamps. If not, I wouldn't sweat it. That service mat probably saved you a few scuffs too.
 

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I bought a used, 2Ton engine hoist, to pull the engine in my F150 for $100 off Craigslist. Haven’t pulled the motor yet, but have used the hoist to lift/hold one end of a bike while changing tires. It’s tall enough to lift the bike, even when the bike is on the lift table. At 2 Ton capacity, with the proper slings, you could pull both wheels with the bike in the air.
 

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When you get to the point of re-installing the front wheel, don't get anxious about the axle being difficult to thread back through the bottom of the right fork, it can be a BEAR. It is difficult to line up properly with only one fork having a spring, using a screwdriver in the hollow end of the axle to help align things while turning the axle from the other side has worked really well for me. There are a couple threads about it if its real difficult for you.
 

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First time I took my front wheel off using my front paddock stand I discovered how hard it is to get that axle lined up when putting it back on. Didnt think about the 2 forks reacting differently. However, when the whole bike is lifted and the forks hang loose they both fully extend to the same length. I bought a 1 ton ratchet puller for $30 and came off a reinforced ceiling joist in my garage.. Youre really only lifting 250lbs(front half of the bike). No problem then, had to learn the hard way!
 

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Nah, I've done it loads of times on my Mk3 and it never slipped, tilted or even became unstable.
An under-tree stand is probably the best way to do it though. Wish I had one.

As for whether to expect damage - the suspension is probably sturdy enough to take on those couple of inches of free fall if it can survive landings from wheelies. Afterwards, just laying there does not cause more stress than if there was a wheel between the legs, the weight load is the same. Inspect whether there are oil leaks from fork seals and, once you lift the bike, whether nothing broke underneath the axle clamps. If not, I wouldn't sweat it. That service mat probably saved you a few scuffs too.
I don't think you understand, there is absolutely no spring and therefore no force in the right fork to keep it erect and when a fork stand is put under both forks, the right fork will collapse when the axle is removed causing the front fender to be stretched and possibly broken because of the unevenness in the forks. Not to mention falling over, trust me I learned this from experiencing it! Mine is a 2015 650LT, not sure about previous years 2014 and back but 2015 forward you better have it strapped to a ceiling beam to the bars or have a Pit Bull triple tree attachment under it which is what I use and had when the incident occurred but was only using the fork stand because I never imagined there only being a spring in just the left side!!!
 

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Good suggestions, friends! I will be working on it tomorrow. Here is a picture of it currently. I guess my only fear at this point is if one of the forks got bent. It doesn’t look like it though. View attachment 180921
Hi, so how did it go?

If not yet up, I figured something else. I can see you have the side stand down and you have crashbars.
You might be able to put a 35" 2x4 under the right front side crashbar while pushing the bike to the left on its rear wheel and side stand.

This works for me because the bike started a foot higher of course...
Your challenge is to push harder while the rear stand is setting the wheel down. and ONLY if the side stand is still past the vertical to avoid folding (which you could tie to crashbars for extra safety)
 

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man, talk about making a project out of a simple R/R on the front wheel. i'm another guy that has used a pair of conventional front and rear paddock stands many times for the job, never a problem, bike didn't fall. if you don't have a front stand, you don't need an elaborate lifting setup to get the front wheel off the ground, just jack the bike up, then block it securely. need i say, don't block to plastic. this advice assumes that the bike is already on a rear paddock stand.

in the OP photo, note the heavy cast motor ID number tab on the front, it makes a perfect location for a jack point. in my photo, i'm using a scissor jack to line up motor mount bolts while installing a motor, but the jack point is the same. these small scissor jacks are often found free or near so, take a minute to weld a nut on the threaded actuator rod so you can use it with a ratchet/socket or box end ratchet, works great. of course, if you happen to have a dirt bike lift as in the photo, you can block and lift directly with that tool. lots of ways to skin the cat, no reason to overthink it, keep it simple and easy.

 

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man, talk about making a project out of a simple R/R on the front wheel. i'm another guy that has used a pair of conventional front and rear paddock stands many times for the job, never a problem, bike didn't fall. if you don't have a front stand, you don't need an elaborate lifting setup to get the front wheel off the ground, just jack the bike up, then block it securely. need i say, don't block to plastic. this advice assumes that the bike is already on a rear paddock stand.

in the OP photo, note the heavy cast motor ID number tab on the front, it makes a perfect location for a jack point. in my photo, i'm using a scissor jack to line up motor mount bolts while installing a motor, but the jack point is the same. these small scissor jacks are often found free or near so, take a minute to weld a nut on the threaded actuator rod so you can use it with a ratchet/socket or box end ratchet, works great. of course, if you happen to have a dirt bike lift as in the photo, you can block and lift directly with that tool. lots of ways to skin the cat, no reason to overthink it, keep it simple and easy.
I find your setup quite unsecure... and mufflerless!
Anyway, Geauxcrush's bike is way down on forks (no space).

I don't think anything will beat a 35" 2x4 under the crashbar. (perhaps a 35" 2x2...)
 
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