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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
When you have standard switch (cut off power on ABS circuit) the error is throw, which you can reset only using jumper. So if you turn off ABS by switch you will not be able to turn it on using switch only.
Buy a BMW
BMW is not match with my expectations. I would choose KTM 1190 or Multistrada 1200 instead.
 

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I picked up the following on a UK forum (to be confirmed):

To turn off the ABS temporarily, get the rear wheel to spin while front wheel stopped until abs light come on. Then the ABS switches off until the bike is restarted.

a) if you added a centerstand, just roll in the air.
b) otherwise if you're on gravel, do a 'burnout" (discount the tire wear, you're about to do worst I hope)

TO BE CONFIRMED (on every year of the model I guess, for revisions).
 

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TonyBKK
12th March 2012 at 6:15 am #127900
Reply To: ABS kill switch for Versys

I’ve tried a few ABS mods on the Versys and think I’ve found the one that works the best for me-

First I pulled the fuse which turns off the ABS. Simple, effective, but I personally am more comfortable with ABS on at the front, even when off pavement.

It’s the ABS on the rear wheel that I find intrusive and sometimes a bit dangerous when your trying to trail brake going down a steep hill and the ABS simply won’t allow you to lock up the rear wheel.

My fix: I simply unplug the ABS sensor for the rear wheel. The ABS still functions normally for the front wheel (I’ve tested it), but with the sensor unplugged the ABS will not function for the rear wheel.

Ride On!

Tony :)

ABS kill switch for Versys | GT-Rider.com
 

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TonyBKK
12th March 2012 at 6:15 am #127900
Reply To: ABS kill switch for Versys

I’ve tried a few ABS mods on the Versys and think I’ve found the one that works the best for me-

First I pulled the fuse which turns off the ABS. Simple, effective, but I personally am more comfortable with ABS on at the front, even when off pavement.

It’s the ABS on the rear wheel that I find intrusive and sometimes a bit dangerous when your trying to trail brake going down a steep hill and the ABS simply won’t allow you to lock up the rear wheel.

My fix: I simply unplug the ABS sensor for the rear wheel. The ABS still functions normally for the front wheel (I’ve tested it), but with the sensor unplugged the ABS will not function for the rear wheel.

Ride On!

Tony :)

ABS kill switch for Versys | GT-Rider.com
My understanding of ABS is the following

Preventing the wheel from locking while breaking
For this, each wheel needs a reference point, the other turning wheel
So, if one wheel is turning faster then the other, the system understand that the other wheel is slipping, releasing a bit of the breaking power to recover same speed has other wheel

By disconnecting one of the 2 sensors, I would think that it compromise the whole system

Finally, I would agree that disconnecting the rear wheel sensor would deactivate the abs on that wheel, that's easily demonstrated for the rear wheel. But I would also think that it would also deactivate the front one, which is another story to demonstrate without taking a major spill while testing

My 2 cents

LOP
 

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ok, but can you confirm/deny that burnout-in-the-dirt-or-grass theory?
(that's much simpler than fiddling with fuses, removing luggage and seat...etc.)
 

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I’ve tried a few ABS mods on the Versys and think I’ve found the one that works the best for me- Just pulled the fuse...simple, effective...(paraphrased)
Resurrecting this old thread as I recently picked up a 2015 Versys with the ABS.

When I look under the seat, there is a group of 2 fuses. One says ABSMOT and the other says ABSVAL.

Would I pull both of them?

I usually leave ABS on but there are occasions when I am going to be riding in loose substrate and I want the ABS off.

I also notice in the manual page 46. " ABS indicator light may go on if; blah , blah...when the engine is started with the stand raised and the transmission engaged and the rear wheel turns".

Interesting... maybe they are talking center stand? If I "raise" my side stand, the engine quits so the rear wheel won't be turning...
 

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My understanding of ABS is the following

Preventing the wheel from locking while breaking
For this, each wheel needs a reference point, the other turning wheel
So, if one wheel is turning faster then the other, the system understand that the other wheel is slipping, releasing a bit of the breaking power to recover same speed has other wheel

By disconnecting one of the 2 sensors, I would think that it compromise the whole system

Finally, I would agree that disconnecting the rear wheel sensor would deactivate the abs on that wheel, that's easily demonstrated for the rear wheel. But I would also think that it would also deactivate the front one, which is another story to demonstrate without taking a major spill while testing

My 2 cents

LOP
The front ABS can still function on its own, as it relates to the speed sensor at countershaft sprocket, which is also used for the speedometer/odometer.
 

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Resurrecting this old thread as I recently picked up a 2015 Versys with the ABS.

When I look under the seat, there is a group of 3 fuses, each of the markers say "ABS".

Would I pull all 3 of them?

I usually leave ABS on but there are occasions when I am going to be riding in loose substrate and I want the ABS off. Sometimes I wish I had my 800GS back.... a simple on/off feature would have been nice.
You've modified my quote to make it look like disabling the ABS altogether is the preferred method... Try disconnecting your rear ABS sensor. It could also operated with a switch wired though it.


"I’ve tried a few ABS mods on the Versys and think I’ve found the one that works the best for me-

First I pulled the fuse which turns off the ABS. Simple, effective, but I personally am more comfortable with ABS on at the front, even when off pavement.

It’s the ABS on the rear wheel that I find intrusive and sometimes a bit dangerous when your trying to trail brake going down a steep hill and the ABS simply won’t allow you to lock up the rear wheel.

My fix: I simply unplug the ABS sensor for the rear wheel. The ABS still functions normally for the front wheel (I’ve tested it), but with the sensor unplugged the ABS will not function for the rear wheel."
 

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You've modified my quote "
Yes, I did and I made it clear that I paraphrased your quote. Sorry, didn't mean to suggest that the fuse solution was the preferred solution. Just A solution that seems to be easier than screwing with sensors.

I damaged a sensor on another bike trying to use that "fix". It was expensive to replace. I'd rather not do that. Also, I think it renders the ODO off which now distorts your actual miles....

Not sure if pulling the fuses does the same thing to the ODO.

I agree that trail braking on hills or in turns on loose stuff with ABS is a dicey proposition.

I guess I'll try pulling both ABS fuses and see what happens! I don't bounce as well as I used to when I was a younger man but...WTH....:laugh:
 

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Original quote from a UK site:
"To turn off the ABS temporarily, get the rear wheel to spin while front wheel stopped until abs light come on. Then the ABS switches off until the bike is restarted."

As far as I can tell from the service manual of the ninja 650r (close sibling), the burnout in the sand will cause service 44 (mismatching speed).
They don't say if the ABS is turned off until next ignition cycle, but that seems a logical action.

Still no one confirmed. Please take a few minutes and go check it and tell us!
 

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Yes, I did and I made it clear that I paraphrased your quote. Sorry, didn't mean to suggest that the fuse solution was the preferred solution. Just A solution that seems to be easier than screwing with sensors.

I damaged a sensor on another bike trying to use that "fix". It was expensive to replace. I'd rather not do that. Also, I think it renders the ODO off which now distorts your actual miles....

Not sure if pulling the fuses does the same thing to the ODO.

I agree that trail braking on hills or in turns on loose stuff with ABS is a dicey proposition.

I guess I'll try pulling both ABS fuses and see what happens! I don't bounce as well as I used to when I was a younger man but...WTH....:laugh:
Disconnecting rear ABS sensor or removing ABS fuse(s) will not affect speedometer/odometer which reads the speed sensor on countershaft (front sprocket nut).

Simply disconnect rear ABS sensor, and wrap the connector ends with electrical tape to try it out... You could also leave it connected, and install a switch inline with the rear ABS sensor wire cut up closer to the fuse box.
 

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Disconnecting rear ABS sensor or removing ABS fuse(s) will not affect speedometer/odometer which reads the speed sensor on countershaft (front sprocket nut).

Simply disconnect rear ABS sensor, and wrap the connector ends with electrical tape to try it out... You could also leave it connected, and install a switch inline with the rear ABS sensor wire cut up closer to the fuse box.
For argument sakes

If there is no rotation at the counter shaft (lock rear wheel for instance), how will this be interpreted for the abs sensor and the front wheel ?
And what will happend then ? Will it release pressure at the front brake to match the 0 rotation detected at the rear wheel/coutershaft ?

LOP
 

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My understanding of ABS is the following

Preventing the wheel from locking while breaking
For this, each wheel needs a reference point, the other turning wheel
I think you're thinking of traction control. ABS should be able to work on a lone wheel just by noting the giant change in velocity when it goes from rolling along at umpteen mph to a dead stop.
 

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Tried, tested, and confirmed:

"My fix: I simply unplug the ABS sensor for the rear wheel. The ABS still functions normally for the front wheel (I’ve tested it), but with the sensor unplugged the ABS will not function for the rear wheel."

ABS Kill Switch For Versys | GT-Rider.com
And what about:
"To turn off the ABS temporarily, get the rear wheel to spin while front wheel stopped until abs light come on. Then the ABS switches off until the bike is restarted."
 

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I think you're thinking of traction control. ABS should be able to work on a lone wheel just by noting the giant change in velocity when it goes from rolling along at umpteen mph to a dead stop.
I admit that they are closely related

I was under the impression that would be a problem for the abs, but Invader has proven me wrong

Good to know !

LOP
 
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