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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Was looking for feed back from 44T Club. After reading about a guy that changed back to stock because of wearing out chain and sprocket in short time? Anyone keepin her lubed and all system are in good shape :thumb: for thousands of miles? Sincerely, MTS :thumb: :thanx:
 

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I ran this setup for three years and didn't notice any difference in the rate of component wear. Nor should anyone frankly: it's a small change to the back sprocket. I could see how going to a 14T front might make the chain wear out more quickly, since it forces the chain to bend more around that smaller sprocket. As they say, YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thank you for the info! :thumb: Alignment! Good call!

Capt. Kirk do you have any feed back as a member of the 44T club? :cool:

I did hear use of steel is better than aluminum.
 

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I've got a little over 11,000 miles on the 44 set-up, everything looks great.

Went to a 43 for a trip and changed it back when I got home, even though it was only one tooth I could tell the difference day in, day out.
The 43 will definately cruise better.

For me the 44 is the ticket.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've got a little over 11,000 miles on the 44 set-up, everything looks great.

Went to a 43 for a trip and changed it back when I got home, even though it was only one tooth I could tell the difference day in, day out.
The 43 will definately cruise better.

For me the 44 is the ticket.

Dan
Thanks Dan! That sounds right on! :thumb:
 

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If you buy a cheap sprocket, you'll have wear issues. The OE is a steel sprocket.

And, I don't advise anyone to use a clip type master link. It's just asking for trouble, IMO :teetertooter:

Keeping the chain and sprockets clean is key to long life. I only use WD-40 on my chains. My 08 CBR1K had 35K on the stock chain and looked perfect, before I sold it.
My BMW S1000RR has 10K and shows zero wear. The V was purchased with the gearing change and had 4K on it. I have no idea how long it's been on the bike,
but the chain looks a little worn. The guy I bought it from had the chain adjusted to tight. It had zero slack and was very dry when I picked it up.
I don't think he had a clue how to adjust or care for a chain drive setup. I only have 1500 miles of my own on the bike, so I'll see how it wears. It's a good sprocket,
so hopefully it will last a while.
 

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According to gearingcommander.com the 46-tooth and the 44-tooth rear should have the same wear characteristics - other than the fact that you will go farther with the 44-tooth for the same number of contacts on the gearing.

I switched to a 43-tooth alloy rear and a 112-pin chain - which gearingcommander.com indicates should have much better better wear characteristic - and have about 4K miles on the set with no apparent wear.

Of course, the gearingcommander.com wear estimates are theoretical. I imagine that lubrication, chain tension and alignment all play significant roles in gearing life (and most likely not in that order).
 

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The thing that will wear out a chain and sprockets faster than any other issue is incorrect alignment or too much tension. You can align the chain with a special tool, motion pro makes one, or just a piece of string and some masking tape. The marks on the swing arm are notoriously inaccurate.

 

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That's a good video for the DIY crew, but it's dependent on front wheel alignment. It's to easy to make a mistake.
The best way is to use a measurement from the swing-arm shaft and the axle shaft.

You can make a tool out of wood, aluminum, steel and anything else you like.

It's not even necessary to add measurement indicators because you're using side to side comparisons.

Just measure one side and match the other side to it. Simple, cheap and easy.
I prefer to use the K.I.S.S. method when working on stuff and this is the simplest and most accurate method I know of :goodidea:
 

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The projected length of the string, when it is just touching the front of the rear wheel amplifies any alignment issues with the rear wheel. You just need to roughly center your front wheel to use as a reference point. No need for the ruler, just hold the string and eyeball it. A fraction of a degree of misalignment at the rear translates into a lot of horizontal distance with the string at the front of the bike. Hold one string at a time and move it slowly horizontally toward the front wheel while sighting down the string. When it "just" touches the front of the rear wheel that is your point of reference. Just eyeball the distance from the string to the centered front wheel at this point. Repeat the process for the string on the other side. Adjust rear wheel, repeat process until it is centered. It is a lot more accurate than the marks on the swing arm or side to side comparisons at the swing arm.
 

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The projected length of the string, when it is just touching the front of the rear wheel amplifies any alignment issues with the rear wheel. You just need to roughly center your front wheel to use as a reference point. No need for the ruler, just hold the string and eyeball it. A fraction of a degree of misalignment at the rear translates into a lot of horizontal distance with the string at the front of the bike. Hold one string at a time and move it slowly horizontally toward the front wheel while sighting down the string. When it "just" touches the front of the rear wheel that is your point of reference. Just eyeball the distance from the string to the centered front wheel at this point. Repeat the process for the string on the other side. Adjust rear wheel, repeat process until it is centered. It is a lot more accurate than the marks on the swing arm or side to side comparisons at the swing arm.

Like I said. For me it's overcomplicated and time consuming.
Using a rod with two dowels is accurate, quick and easy. To each their own :devil:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks a million you guys! More than one way to skin a cat. I orded a 44T to give a try! And now have an idea how to get everything straight. :thumb: :thanx:

I have to say, got the V in 2010 and have enjoyed it more than any other bike although still have my young love for klx250. All the trees are turning here and I'm in a gotta ride mode! :thumb::thumb:
 
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