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Actually, something of that sort is written in the great book, 'Proficient Motorcycling'. The idea is first that you cut off the engine inertia; at this point, as you press the brakes, there is not much of an engine braking, but rather engine wants to pull you forwards. also pressing clutch, prevents the rear wheel from locking. Second, at the point of coming to stop, you can already downshift, helping to get away from a potentially dangerous situation. Best is rolling the throttle-pressing the clutch - downshifting - braking -- all done simultaneously. i am actually learning how to downshift while braking in all situations. Some say that downshifting helps to brake, but this does not make sense in emergency braking as there is simply no time.

but here is the youtube video where the person says similar things.

 

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Actually, something of that sort is written in the great book, 'Proficient Motorcycling'. The idea is first that you cut off the engine inertia; at this point, as you press the brakes, there is not much of an engine braking, but rather engine wants to pull you forwards. also pressing clutch, prevents the rear wheel from locking. Second, at the point of coming to stop, you can already downshift, helping to get away from a potentially dangerous situation. Best is rolling the throttle-pressing the clutch - downshifting - braking -- all done simultaneously. i am actually learning how to downshift while braking in all situations. Some say that downshifting helps to brake, but this does not make sense in emergency braking as there is simply no time.

but here is the youtube video where the person says similar things.

Yes, I agree with you, especially downshifting in an emergency to be in the proper gear to shoot out of trouble if you need to.
Anyone ever ride a 125cc 2 stroke DIRT BIKE in tight single track woods or hare scramble situations? Very narrow power band and light flywheel weight, in technical terrain they can stall in a heartbeat. You are always cognizant of engine rpm, gear selection, brake sliding into turns while downshifting, fanning the clutch and steering into a rocky uphill switchback...MULTI-TASKING.
Riding dirtbikes all of my life, it has been ingrained into me that if you really grab the brakes (not casual slowing) you automatically grab the clutch and immediately downshift a gear or two to compensate for the lower engine rpm. That's also why when riding in traffic I don't lug the motor, I'm always a little higher in the rpms above casual cruising so I am able to maneuver quickly if needed. I have been cut off or merged into far too many times.
 

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I recently purchased my Versys, new, and I’m not sure if it has an assist/slipper clutch. I’ve read through lots of forums and have tried to google specs but found nothing to confirm whether it is equipped or not.
Owners manual makes no reference either.
Just curious as I’m a slightly experienced, novice rider.
Trying to refine and adjust my riding experience.
Thanks.
Just a follow up, this thread started about the slipper clutch, progressed to the point that questioning why install a slipper clutch. Well it was never a debate for me, what I would question is why Kawasaki installed it on the Ninja 650, as the motor and transmission is identical to the Versys. For those disagreeing, yes the troque curve and HP are different as the cams on intake and exhaust are different, otherwise the same. To me there never was a debate , I chose to install it and am happy. Yesterday came back from a 450KM ride, purposely dropped down 2 gears and engine braked, nice smooth , hit around 7000 RPM . FYI just in case someone says something, the rev limiter is electronic, from the ECU, I don't think it is possible , but again I don't intend to try dropping into first at 130KM/HR to see if I can exceed red line with the slipper clutch. I think I would need to be around 8000 RPM when I let the clutch out on the downshift.
 

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the old clutch system works very well and is well proven. I have a regular clutch on Tiger 800, and it does not bother me a bit. the slipper clutch is just a marketing thing or something for beginners. I do appreciate a lighter clutch lever though. as I mentioned before, it is like with mobile phones. they don't know how to entice people to buy their new phones so they invent all kinds of crap.

Do you know who invented the marketing or advertising? it was the nephew of Freud, Edward Bernays. He convinced people that fluoride is good for the teeth, because some factories were afraid of being sued, so they hired him. And he convinced women that smoking is good for them; it was called torches of freedom. He was a complete a**.

So now, all the bike companies want to invent something new, like cornering ABS and whatnot, the suspension that you can control electronically. One more thing that can break down! I met a guy whose Ducati showed engine error, just after leaving the showroom! I do like to have ABS, but all the rest, no, thank you very much.
 

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the old clutch system works very well and is well proven. I have a regular clutch on Tiger 800, and it does not bother me a bit. the slipper clutch is just a marketing thing or something for beginners. I do appreciate a lighter clutch lever though. as I mentioned before, it is like with mobile phones. they don't know how to entice people to buy their new phones so they invent all kinds of crap.

Do you know who invented the marketing or advertising? it was the nephew of Freud, Edward Bernays. He convinced people that fluoride is good for the teeth, because some factories were afraid of being sued, so they hired him. And he convinced women that smoking is good for them; it was called torches of freedom. He was a complete a**.

So now, all the bike companies want to invent something new, like cornering ABS and whatnot, the suspension that you can control electronically. One more thing that can break down! I met a guy whose Ducati showed engine error, just after leaving the showroom! I do like to have ABS, but all the rest, no, thank you very much.
Sounds like you are a expert, I find it hard to believe someone would spend time and effort to design a slipper clutch as a marketing ploy to sell motorcycles. As to a beginner, I can only speak for myself, @quexpress suggested I might really like it,since he was the first to post it on the forum. At 70 I wouldn't say I am a beginner , but @Kris you seem to know a lot, so before I had a 07 Versys, non ABS , some close calls, does my 2015 ABS 650 really need ABS braking, probably not, but like the slipper clutch, it reduces the chance of losing traction on the rear wheel while braking.

If both features were optional, say for a additional $500 , after having both , I would spend the $$$.

Same as the ECU flash, the original fuel map works fine for many, for me , the new flash makes my bike perform like a totally different bike.

My bike my money, a beginner, well I have gone down 3 times now, I have well over 200,000 KM so far on motorccycles in my lifetime ( 30% on dual sport bikes like the DRZ400s), of that , roughly 40% on Versys 650.
Something like a buddy I worked with use to say, if you aren't bleeding you aren't working, that was a comment he made when he came back from the hospital, wait, he also said there are more stitches where those came from, that was after he went off the roof of a school portable while stringing communication cable as a electrician, something like 7 stitches, and he was back at it, not quitting time yet.
 

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@Kris

FYI Slipper Clutches have been fitted on most high displacement four stroke road racing motorcycles since the early 1990s, Moto GPs, etc.

Many sports bikes such as Kawasaki zx10r 04+, Kawasaki zx6rr '04, Kawasaki zx6r 05+, GSXR 1000 '05+, etc., etc.

… a marketing thing for beginners LOL??? o_O
 

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well, I do have a slipper clutch on V650. Because I replaced it with the one I installed on Vulcan S from Ninja 650 (from the Vulcan I am selling). Ok, there are some benefits to it. But are they worth the price and all the hassle? I don't think so. And not, I am not an 'expert', (who is?) but just use common sense. What is the use of the slipper clutch anyway? Not to stress the engine if you downshift too abruptly? Who is doing it anyway? Slipper clutch will not save you from stressing the engine, it is just slightly helping. One is meant to slow the bike, or do rev-matching before going to lower gears.
 

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What is the use of the slipper clutch anyway?
Helps keep your rear-wheel from locking-up on rapid down-shifts.
 

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"Helps keep your rear-wheel from locking-up on rapid down-shifts."

Oh yes! Of the different advantages of a slipper/assist clutch, riding safety is a major one.
 
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