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I read somewhere (that I can't remember) that someone went from a 15 tooth to a 16 tooth sprocket and the engine didn't sound like it had such a sense of urgency anymore. Has anyone done this or toyed with the idea and how difficult is it to do? Any special tools required? Pros / Cons? Also, does it seem like the first couple of gears are really close? For example, you can shift from first to third and it seems more normal. When I shift from first to second I get the impression that I'm still in the same gear, that it didn't make a whole lot of difference. You thoughts appreciated.

Thanks,

Hankles
08 Kawi Versys
05 BMW R1200RT
 

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So, uh, has anyone thought of replacing the rear sprocket with a smaller one instead of replacing the front sprocket with a larger one? What would that do compared to replacing the front one?
 

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switched to 16t last month, great improvement on highway,easier on gas, 100kph at 4500rpm, however if your in heavy traffic most of the time you may go thru a few clutches pretty quick.
 

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I like a 16 on mine as well. Little longer range between shifts around town is nice.
 

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Other than getting a slight increase in mileage going to the 16 tooth, what other advantages are there? i'm turning around 5K rpm at 70mph, this bike has a 10.5k redline, so at 70mph i should be up in the powerband, passing is no problem, i sold my 1150rt bmw to buy the versys,and love it, no regrets, one of my biggest complaints with the RT was that 6th gear was so damn high, i had no power to pass and had to downshift on any slight hill. it was just a wasted gear for me, if i lived in kansas or somewhere flat fine, but not in Va. what is the rpm reduction going to the 16 tooth?
 

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Gearing is up 6.66% when going from 15 to 16 CS sprocket. The relation between indicated RPM and indicated speed does not change because the speed sensor in on the countershaft. Speedometer error is reduced by 6.66% to about 1.5% over. Odometer error is increased to about 6% under actual distance covered. To calculate MPG with 16 tooth sprocket, 6% should be added to distance before dividing it by amount of fuel... By the way, Kms divided by liters, multiplied by 2.825 = MPG (Imperial gallon). Kms divided by liters, multiplied by 2.354 = MPG (US gallon).
 

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Other than getting a slight increase in mileage going to the 16 tooth, what other advantages are there? i'm turning around 5K rpm at 70mph, this bike has a 10.5k redline, so at 70mph i should be up in the powerband, passing is no problem, i sold my 1150rt bmw to buy the versys,and love it, no regrets, one of my biggest complaints with the RT was that 6th gear was so damn high, i had no power to pass and had to downshift on any slight hill. it was just a wasted gear for me, if i lived in kansas or somewhere flat fine, but not in Va. what is the rpm reduction going to the 16 tooth?
Sounds like going with a 16t sprocket wouldn't be an advantage for you.
 

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Gearing is up 6.66% when going from 15 to 16 CS sprocket. The relation between indicated RPM and indicated speed does not change because the speed sensor in on the countershaft. Speedometer error is reduced by 6.66% to about 1.5% over. Odometer error is increased to about 6% under actual distance covered. To calculate MPG with 16 tooth sprocket, 6% should be added to distance before dividing it by amount of fuel... By the way, Kms divided by liters, multiplied by 2.825 = MPG (Imperial gallon). Kms divided by liters, multiplied by 2.354 = MPG (US gallon).
If your calculations are correct for Odometer, then my last tank of gas was 56mpg instead of 53mpg, I like that a lot!
 

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Gearing is up 6.66% when going from 15 to 16 CS sprocket. The relation between indicated RPM and indicated speed does not change because the speed sensor in on the countershaft. Speedometer error is reduced by 6.66% to about 1.5% over. Odometer error is increased to about 6% under actual distance covered. To calculate MPG with 16 tooth sprocket, 6% should be added to distance before dividing it by amount of fuel... By the way, Kms divided by liters, multiplied by 2.825 = MPG (Imperial gallon). Kms divided by liters, multiplied by 2.354 = MPG (US gallon).

Yeah, what he said. ;)

For those of you cracking open your 10th grade algebra book, multiply miles traveled by 1.06, then figure mileage as usual.
 

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Does 16t sprocket cause the bike to lug at low rpm? Do you need more throttle to get the bike rolling? thanks
 

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To me, the difference pulling out & low speed, high gear (or lugging situations) is almost negligible. You'll notice it more at cruising speeds. I did notice its a little harder to get the front tire off the ground in second, but I can live with that.



(Maybe I should have started this reply with, "From one Bear to another..."):D:D:D:D
 
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