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I personally don't understand riding a motorcycle on the interstate, but I realize that some folks enjoy that. I have been on that length of road pulling a travel trailer behind a pickup truck. If I recall correctly the concrete roadway made it feel like driving a bucking bronco with the uneven concrete sections.

Highway pegs so you can change positions as well as using the passenger pegs.
Bicycle shorts for a little added cushion and moisture absorbsion.
Monkey Butt powder.
Hydration Bladder
Plan light meals
Good tunes to stay away the boredom.
Spray bottle and microfiber to keep the shield clean.
Pre plan you fuel stops so you know there are active and open stations at the time you will be passing through.
Give the tires some extra air but not over the recommended max pressure on the sidewall. They will run cooler on the interstate but remember the reduced traction for the exit ramps.

Have fun!
 

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I just completed 3250 kms in four days. One thing that worked well for me was trail mix or beef jerky and Gatorade every time I stopped for fuel. Didn't have the monkey butt powder but could of used it one day.
 

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I'd shorten up the ride to Sundance, you've got an extra hundred miles in that route that you don't need. If you really want to get your mileage base covered then go to Moorcroft (provided there is gas there). You will need to get receipts in both directions for Sioux Falls to prove that you didn't cut the corner, which is unfortunate because its too soon for a stop on the way out.

Remember your fuel receipts are very important for verification! Have a way to keep them organized and make sure that all receipts have the required info! Have a plan for what you will do if it does not.

On the way out plan for worse MPG than normal. Most of the time you will be encounter strong winds moving west to east on I-90. Make sure you know the MPG you will get at the speed you plan to ride on I-90! Plan your fuel stops. Know where the gas stations are and stick to the plan. If you have Garmin's Mapsource it can be good for finding the gas stations. If not Google street view can be helpful.

In deference to Cormad's suggestion I'd avoid Gatorade. You should drink at every stop if you have no way to drink on the bike, and once your body has enough electrolytes it wants to get rid of them...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Highway pegs so you can change positions as well as using the passenger pegs.
Have fun!
This ain't my first rodeo. Check out my build thread. I've done long days (600+) and know how to travel on a bike. I'm just not sure how fatigue will hit me on the ride. I need tips on psychology of the ride more than gear and bike setup.
 

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It would be much easier with another partner riding too
be well rested prior to start
temperature low
eat lite
every 3 +- hrs short breaks
Hydrate a lot
4 me talk radio (maybe satellite)
start early in the dark finish before dark
use lite coating of Vaseline or other substance on exposed skin face and neck
the worst part is going to be the arse and upper legs
it's a long day but NBD
IMO
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It would be much easier with another partner riding too
I disagree with that. With two people, you are getting tired at different rates, consuming gas at different rates, and have to work at staying together on the road instead of just going whatever pace you feel is ok for you. I think that would just complicate something that is already very tough to begin with.

I would like to take a friend along, but pretty sure it would not be a good move.
 

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"I need tips on psychology of the ride more than gear and bike setup."

I would buy a lottery ticket on a large lottery just before I left. As I ride I would plan out what I will buy when I win.

I also live by this saying "pain is temporary..pride and glory is for a lifetime"

Good Luck
 

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I disagree with that. With two people, you are getting tired at different rates, consuming gas at different rates, and have to work at staying together on the road instead of just going whatever pace you feel is ok for you. I think that would just complicate something that is already very tough to begin with.

I would like to take a friend along, but pretty sure it would not be a good move.
As you point out Friends along can be a negative, but they are also positive. When I did my very first 1000 mile day it was in the Minnesota 1000. So we were bonus hunting and going all over the damn place. At about 5am I was exhausted and was done. But I couldn't quit because I didn't want to disappoint my buddy. Had I been alone I probably would have quit. However I had the opposite experience with that same buddy on my ride around the Great Lakes. He wanted to slow down and do it in 4 days. It would have meant stopping in Wisconsin 100 miles from my house and 250 miles from the finish at about 5 in the evening. Put a real strain on the ride to try and keep him moving. I ride solo now. Also with 2 or more your stop time is always the longest of your times. Someone is always waiting on their bike to leave.

If you have a buddy that is motivated to do a SS1000 I would say do it. If however you have someone that is willing to come along to support you... well leave them at home.

I like to make each leg of the ride a close to the same distance as possible. It makes me feel all I have to do is what I just did. On your ride you will have to get those receipts at Sioux Falls, so it leaves you with 415 miles to go if you do the shorter route. So I would aim for 2 207 mile legs. But your in SD so that means you will find very few gas stations. Reality will probably force you to compromise.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
These are the benchmarks for the ride. Time listed is the maximum time I can spend getting to any given point. This way I can tell if I have enough time to rest or if I have to just gas and go. I should have between 4 and 5 hours of downtime on this ride.

LeMars-(Sioux Falls)-Mitchell-3H 15M 154 miles

Mitchell-Murdo --------------6H 9M 138 miles (292 total miles)

Murdo-Rapid City------------9H 4M 136 miles (428 total miles)

Rapid City-Gillette, WY------12H 0M 139 miles (567 total miles)

Gillette-Rapid City-----------15H 4M 139 miles (706 total miles)

Rapid City-Murdo------------18H 9M 136 miles (842 total miles)

Murdo-Mitchell--------------20H 45M 138 miles (980 total miles)

Mitchell-(Sioux Falls)-LeMars-24H 0M 154 miles (1134 total miles)
 

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These are the benchmarks for the ride. Time listed is the maximum time I can spend getting to any given point. This way I can tell if I have enough time to rest or if I have to just gas and go. I should have between 4 and 5 hours of downtime on this ride.

LeMars-(Sioux Falls)-Mitchell-3H 15M 154 miles

Mitchell-Murdo --------------6H 9M 138 miles (292 total miles)

Murdo-Rapid City------------9H 4M 136 miles (428 total miles)

Rapid City-Gillette, WY------12H 0M 139 miles (567 total miles)

Gillette-Rapid City-----------15H 4M 139 miles (706 total miles)

Rapid City-Murdo------------18H 9M 136 miles (842 total miles)

Murdo-Mitchell--------------20H 45M 138 miles (980 total miles)

Mitchell-(Sioux Falls)-LeMars-24H 0M 154 miles (1134 total miles)

You should have more than 5 hours of downtime.....while you are travelling across the great state of South Dakota on I-90, the speed limit is 75. You should easily maintain an overall average of 65 mph if you include your stops.:goodluck:
 

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You stop list looks great. I would also add the times you expect to get to each stop. It helps keep me motivated and on task. Personally I get VERY tired after riding 20+ hours. Unless you are planning a nap at one of these stops I would make every attempt to finish this in 20 hours or less. The limit for almost this entire ride is 75mph. So with 15-25 minute stops 20 hours is easily within range. When I do my 24 hours rides I try to leave about 3 hours before I normally wake up, so I start the day tired, but then wake up. I find this works better than starting the day and trying to ride through the night.

Forgot if you have heated gear or not? If not take long johns and sweaters. Run into a rain storm at night and you will be freezing, which will drop your body temp and make you sleepy.

Best of luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Forgot if you have heated gear or not? If not take long johns and sweaters. Run into a rain storm at night and you will be freezing, which will drop your body temp and make you sleepy.

Best of luck!
No heated gear, but plenty of stuff to layer with. Always have these onboard: HJC waterproof snowmobile gloves, Firstgear jacket (and liner), tourmaster pants (and liner), mechanic gloves (lightweight), NRA sweatshirt, extra pair of socks, rain covers for boots. The coat and pants are both waterproof as well.
 
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