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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-19-2008 06:54 PM
dallasdon I run the Mobil 1 racing 10-40 synthetic and it's damned expensive. Almost $9.00 a quart.
09-19-2008 06:46 PM
boogdaddy
Quote:
Originally Posted by hacktracker View Post
I think the more expensive, synthetic oils tend to make the shifting nicer than the regular dino-juice. For the most part, any JASO MA oil should be fine. Having said that, it only takes 2 quarts for an oil change, so I'll probably splurge a little and go with something good from either Motul or Redline.

Are Motul or Redline the only synth oils that are worthy of "splurging" on in your opinion? I'm asking because I am ready for another oil change at about 2000miles and am going to go semi-synth this time, and full synth to come later. Do you or does anyone else have an opinion on Silkolene? Is it good stuff or not so much?

And can anyone tell me....does using the 3/4" longer filter present any other problems with clearance or the like?

Thanks
07-20-2008 07:38 PM
chazzman Everyone has their opinions and having used synthetics for over 20 years I am certain that is the way to go if you want longer engine life, better fuel mileage and performance. The synthetic coats the lubricated parts and greatly reduces wear on initial start up, that is where you get the most engine wear anyway is on start up. The engine also runs cooler with the synthetic. I switched from mobil 1 to Amsoil about 5 years ago. There is a Goldwing with 350,000 miles with no engine work that has been running Amsoil 10W40 since new. The 10 in 10W40 is the weight of the oil on a cold start. The 40 is the weight after the engine reaches operating temperature. Where I live 10W40 is appropriate year round. The oil change is the most important thing you can do to protect your investment. I am certainly not an expert on oil by any means but I have been in the Automotive business my entire life and seen engines destroyed from sludge build up. I run my automobiles 5000 on Amsoil between changes and could easily go 10,000. I like to change oil filters at 5000 so I just go ahead and replace the oil at that time. I get excellent pricing on Amsoil so it's not bad. I do the same on my Goldwing but the rider with 350,000 miles has changed his oil and filter every 10,000. I usually overkill so 5000 suites my taste. I rode Harleys for a few years and the dealers would always argue with me on synthetic saying that it would cause the roller bearings to slide instead of roll, what a crock. Harley enjoyed selling dirt cheap crude oil with the HD logo and made millions. When the word came out on V twins saying how important synthetic was for the hot running Harley's and all the mags starting posting results, how convenient it was for Harley to stamp the HD logo on semi synthetic oil. Amsoil smokes the Harley oil and now most HD riders run Amsoil.
07-20-2008 03:38 PM
cls Rotella T in everything I own. Works great, and it's cheap.
07-20-2008 10:34 AM
maddjack I am currently running 10w40 pennzoil motorcycle oil,but will switch to Rotella 15w40 after warrenty is out
07-16-2008 01:49 PM
hacktracker
Quote:
Originally Posted by TAC650 View Post
I too have been using Rotella in my bikes for many years with great results. I just swapped out my break in oil out for Rotella 15-40 Dino and after about 2000 more miles I will go to Rotella 5-40 Synthetic at 4000 mile intervals.
I usually run half conventional 15W40 and half 5W40 to make 10W40.

That stuff seems to work well.
07-16-2008 01:48 PM
hacktracker
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnaversys View Post
20/50 syn flows easier cold than 10/40 dyno
Not to start any trouble, but this is not necessarily true. A quick check of the Valvoline website shows their conventional 10W40 has a cST of 95.41 at 40 degrees C (not cold, but low for oil). Their "Full" syn 20W50 has a cST of 145 at the same temp. So, at this temp, the conventional 10W40 flows better than synthetic 20W50.

Now the synthetic may have a lower pour point; however, that does not necessarily translate to easier cold flow. Just trying to keep the facts straight.
07-15-2008 11:13 PM
TAC650
Rotella

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skeeter190 View Post
I run Shell Rotella T Synthetic 5W-40 in everything,The pickup,quads,dirtbike,lawnmower,Heck I even pour it in my coffee
If it needs oil at my house it gets the blue bottle

I too have been using Rotella in my bikes for many years with great results. I just swapped out my break in oil out for Rotella 15-40 Dino and after about 2000 more miles I will go to Rotella 5-40 Synthetic at 4000 mile intervals.
07-15-2008 08:48 AM
Magnaversys 20/50 syn flows easier cold than 10/40 dyno
07-15-2008 12:24 AM
Lukejt Check it out, page 45 in the Versys service manual explains that too much slack in the clutch lever will cause slippage. Correct gap is 2-3mm with the lever just taking up the slack. It's not the oil, in my case.
07-14-2008 07:59 PM
danomar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docteric View Post
Is it preferable to go to a synth/dino blend before going to full synthetic?
It is definitely not a good idea to start a new motor with full synthetic. That is certain. It is possible to switch to fully synthetic after only 1000 miles and probably not see much problem, but on the other hand, parts are still bedding in at that point. Full synthetic can delay the expected process of developing wear faces/patterns.

One could argue the point both ways. Modern motors take several thousand miles to fully 'break-in' and I feel that semi-synthetic oil is a good compromise toward eventually going full-synthetic. The truth is that plain-jane oil is perfectly fine as long as it (and the oil filter) are regularly changed/renewed. Synthetic blends also provide excellent lubrication.

We tend to forget that there are hundreds of reciprocating and load-bearing surfaces in a motorcycle engine. Unlike cars, motorcycles also rely more heavily on oil as a cooling medium. In shared-transmission sump designs, the motor oil takes care of all those tranny gears, too, and that is the main reason why I run semi- or full-synthetic designed specifically for motorcycles in such bikes. In bikes where the engine and transmission are separate, I use plain-jane oil in the motor and the typically recommended hypoid oil in the transmission. Each oil is designed for a different, specific function and going fancy with synthetic oil provides dubious benefit. When the oil is doing as many things as it needs to do in the Versys, for example, I am willing to pay a bit more for oil that makes the transmission shift slicker and suspend clutch contaminant better.

As far as the original question is concerned, I do think that a motor as tightly engineered as in the Versys should get a few thousand miles on it before going full synthetic. Going straight to full-synthetic might preclude some surfaces from swapping out those crucial molecules that comprise a good bearing surface. I also want the transmission to wear a bit to get looser and thus shift better. I am already prolonging that by using a synthetic blend, but I also really want the benefits of using an oil like Motul to start now.

The oil brand and type game is just that. Yes, synthetic is better than regular dino oil, but just how much better and whether it is worth triple the price for a quart is a contentious issue.

Sorry about the long post. No more oil talk for me! Time for a scotch and a nice video.
07-14-2008 12:57 PM
Lukejt
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Alert View Post
Lukejt, if your clutch is slipping with OEM dyno oil, then I have to ask, if your clutch is properly adjusted. You should have a little bit of free-play in the clutch lever. If you don't have this free-play then the pressure plate springs can't apply full pressure on the clutch pack. Worth a check.

Red
I was thinking along the same lines. Actually, there was a LOT of play, the clutch engaged after about 1/2 pull of the lever. So today I adjusted the cable so that it engages further out (have to reach a tad more). I think it's better now. I didn't get a chance to REALLY get on it hard, but I hammered it a few times on the way home and I didn't notice any slippage. Maybe it was just enough pressure from my finger resting on the lever (I've always got both levers covered with one finger) causing it to slip just ever so slightly.

I'll know more in a couple days.
07-13-2008 10:16 PM
danomar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Alert View Post
Filter construction has long been a topic of discussion on ST forums.
<snip>
If you are really serious about oil qualities, I suggest you contact an organization like Blackstone Labs and get your oil tested.
Good post.
d
07-13-2008 09:55 PM
Red Alert Lukejt, if your clutch is slipping with OEM dyno oil, then I have to ask, if your clutch is properly adjusted. You should have a little bit of free-play in the clutch lever. If you don't have this free-play then the pressure plate springs can't apply full pressure on the clutch pack. Worth a check.

Red
07-13-2008 09:22 PM
Lukejt It's been doing it since it was new, but I'll wind up changing the oil all the same. It never slips on it's own, the clutch keeps slipping for half a second or a second once the clutch lever is released if I'm hard on the throttle.
07-13-2008 08:46 PM
invader Absolutely. If it's automotive Mobil 1, change it before more damage is done and you might salvage your clutch. Mobil 1's Racing 4T 10W40 would be compatible with the wet clutch.
http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/...4T_10W-40.aspx

Quote:
Originally Posted by Docteric View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by danomar View Post
I just switched to Motul synthetic blend 5100 10W/40 and will go full synthetic in a few thousand miles.
Is it preferable to go to a synth/dino blend before going to full synthetic?
It's not necessary, but not a bad idea. I'll switch to Amsoil synthetic at just past 2000 Kms (1300 miles).
I save over 35% including shipping on any Amsoil product compared to getting it from Canadian Tire, and it's at my door in a couple days. You can save 20% if ordering from USA...
07-13-2008 07:37 PM
Bear on a bicycle Personally, I wouldn't wait until the next oil change. If your clutch is slipping, you should probably switch oil now.



07-13-2008 04:32 PM
Lukejt I'm finding that my clutch is slipping WAY more than I would like. However, it did this before I switched to Moblil One with the factory or dealer installed oil. I don't know if it's the oil, or the clutch, but I can fully release the clutch and with a lot of throttle dialed it the clutch will more often than not continue to slip for a second or so, it's a real bummer. However, sometimes it grabs like it should resulting in a bit of a wheelie. It's very inconsistent and I don't like it. I dunno. It's right up there as the #1 thing I don't like about the Versys (while I LOVE the bike) with a lack of feel for the brakes being the 2nd issue (I'm getting used to these as well, but will be switching to a more aggressive brake pad in the future).

I've used Mobil 1 in every bike I've owned (5 in all) and never had any clutch issues, but I've read all the JASO info and realize the friction modifiers may present problems for certain motorcycles. My next oil change I will use Rotella, as this is what I use my other vehicles, except the dirt bike which requires 50 to 60wt oil.
07-13-2008 01:43 PM
Red Alert Invader's info is good news to me. The wet clutch is the separating factor between Automotive Oil and Motorcycle oil. When the oil industries starting adding increased percentages of "friction modifiers" some bikes started to experience slipping clutches. Motorcycle specific oils had reduced friction modifiers in their formulation. I use the Rotella in My ST1100 and have found it to be excellent. I will say that the Amsoil did provide smoother shifting than other oils.

Filter construction has long been a topic of discussion on ST forums. Several people over the years have done extensive research on various filters quality of construction and filtering ability. There is much more to a filter than rather it will fit or not. Bypass valve, drain-back and several issues concerning mesh size of the filter media and square area of the filter media are important issues.

If you are willing to pay extra to switch to full synthetic then I would suggest you pay for the OEM brand name filter as well. One of the major advantages to using full synthetic oil is that it holds up longer and thus allows longer change intervals.

If you are really serious about oil qualities, I suggest you contact an organization like Blackstone Labs and get your oil tested. Based on these tests you can set up an informed change interval based on facts and not on a Lawyer's Liability Interval.

Red
07-13-2008 10:28 AM
Docteric [QUOTE=danomar;6131] I just switched to Motul synthetic blend 5100 10W/40 and will go full synthetic in a few thousand miles.


Is it preferable to go to a synth/dino blend before going to full synthetic?
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