How do you do your long trips? - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-20-2009, 08:57 PM Thread Starter
 
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How do you do your long trips?

I am planning on taking my V for a 1500 mile trip to Yellowstone this fall and it will be my first big adventure on motorcycle. I have heard about people that camp on their trips and people that stay in hotels. I am just wondering how you do your long trips, like where you stay and how you do your meals. Do you eat out everywhere you go or cook over the campfire. Any advice or stories that would prepare me for my big adventure would be greatly appreciated.
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post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-20-2009, 09:50 PM
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bendevries, others will chime in, but I'll give you my take as well.

As for lodging, I've done a bit of both hotel and camping. My first choice is camping since that's more of what I want out of the whole experience. A big appeal to the whole thing is being alone out on the road roughing it. Sure, I meet up with others some time and ride for a while, but mostly I find myself traveling the long distances alone and camping fits into that well. With that said, when I decide to find a cheap roadside motel and get a shower and soft bed, I'm always glad I did. People live in houses for a reason. Outside gets old after a few days.

As for food, I've had good success with meal shakes and protein bars. Not as fun as eating out all the time, but you feel better and pack a heck of a lot lighter than if you're trying to carry and cook real food. My personal preference is GNC Lean Shakes and Special K meal bars. I usually do 4 shakes a day and 2 bars a day. I definitely eat real food when I want it, but it's nice to know that all I need is a little clean water and I can make "dinner" without a lot of trouble.

That approach is not for everyone, but for this fat boy that's always on a diet anyway, it works out pretty well.

Good luck on the trip. Preparing is half the fun. Well a third of it anyway.

Chris in Oneonta, NY
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post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-20-2009, 11:31 PM
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Camping in the Stone

I'm primarily a backpacker, so when I do a bike trip, I prefer to camp. When I do road trips to Yellowstone, I always camp after the first night on the road. I like to camp outside the parks on Forest Service land - I can camp pretty much where I like there. I'm not a big fan of campgrounds in the park - they're noisy as hell for most of the night and since I'm an early riser, it makes it hard to pile out if I've been up for most of the night.

If you do camp while in the Tetons or Yellowstone, there are some good places to get cheap showers. In the Tetons, Colter Bay Campground has a good laundry and showers available for a reasonable price. You can get a towel and soap there too for a small fee. It's usually the first place I head after spending a few days on the trail in the backcountry - the next is the cafeteria.

In Yellowstone, there are a lot of choices for showers and food. Each of the 'villages' in the Park have laundries and showers, along with restaurants. Grant Village has a great cafeteria down on the shore of Yellowstone Lake - good pizza, pasta, and salads. There are showers and a laundry at the campground.

Of course, Old Faithful Village has everything imaginable, including the only 4 leaf clover interchange in a national park. No camping there though.

Canyon has pretty good food in the cafeteria, along with showers and a laundry. The store has a good snack bar too.

Fisihing Bridge has all the amenities, but is a madhouse of motorhomes and barking dogs. Hopefully, someday the park will remove the eyesore that sits in the middle of some of the best grizzly habitat in the park. There was an agreement that when Grant Village was built that the Fishing Bridge mess would be removed and put back into a more natural state, but now we're stuck with both. When Grant was built, it was constructed atop some prime cutthroat trout spawning streams. To reduce conflict between the bears that depend on the trout for food in early summer and the people that stay at Grant, the powers that be decided to block the streams to the migrating trout. Dumb and dumber!

Roosevelt Lodge has some pretty primitive accomodations. The Rough Rider cabins are a pretty good deal if you don't want to spend a lot of money on a fancier room.

If I decide to get a room, I prefer to rent a cabin just outside the northeast entrance to the park in Silver Gate. Whispering Pines has some nice little log cabins with kitchenets and shower for a modest price. We have watched moose, mule deer, wolves, and grizzly walk right by our cabin door while staying there.

In Mammoth, you can get a shower by going to the Mammoth Hotel and checking at the front desk. They'll supply a towel and soap and give directions to the public showers - there is at least one on each floor. It only costs a few bucks and is well worth it. I've stopped in there a few times after spending a week or two in the backcountry and I love the looks that I get from the folks in fancy clothes as I pass through in my grimy duds.

If you're in the Mammoth region, it's worthwhile to head down to Gardiner to get some good grub. Helens restaurant on the north end of town is a popular stop. It doesn't look too impressive, but the burgers are legendary. Outlaw Pizza has great pizza, pasta, and ice cold Moose Drool. For breakfast, I often stop in at the Town Cafe on 'Main Street'. Big portions of traditional breakfast grub are available there. You can get steaks upstairs in the evening too.

If you want something a bit wilder than the camping in the crowded campgrounds in the park, check out the campgrounds in the Beartooth Mountains outside the park. The road is one of the prettiest highways in America and there are some really nice campgrounds along the way. The season is really short up there though - it can snow at any time, so watch the weather closely. The last time I stayed up there, it snowed nearly 2 1/2 feet the morning after I left. I would have had a hell of a time getting to the airport in Jackson if I'd left a day later.

I envy you the trip - it will be next year before I get another chance to go back 'home' to Yellowstone.


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post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-20-2009, 11:46 PM
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Travel light, take minimum amount of clothes and 'stuff'.

Be flexible, don't have a set time or destination, puts too much pressure on you to travel too far or too little. If its nice camp, if its raining pick a cheap motel and dry your stuff out. I never book motels in advance, even in high season. As long as you are not in a major city with a big Porno convention, you'll never have a problem getting a room.

I do carry a very light-weight camp stove for tea/coffee or at a pinch a stew. Otherwise I have yogurt, granola bar and banana for breakfast, something like a Subway for lunch then a dinner out at a non-chain bar or restaurant.

Headlamp and a Camel-back are two things I don't leave home without. Along with real waterproof stuff. Waterproof motorcycle gear is an oxymoron. Check yours out before you end up with an 8 hour day in torrential rain.

I have a sheep skin seat cover and on trips over 300m in a day, an Airhawk cushion.

If its your first long trip, try a weekend first with what you think you need. Then come home and leave all the stuff you didn't use and add the stuff you really need.

I carry a Plug & Go kit and small Slime 12 volt pump. Cell phone and a way to charge it, plus I have a TomTom GPS not essential, maps are just as good, unless you plan on travelling on some off road logging/gravel stuff.

Let someone know roughly where you are and when you are roughly going to check in-don't be too exact, if you have a break-down you'll cause them to worry unnecessarily. If you are going remote a couple of my buddies have a SPOT, its on my Xmas list.

Make sure your tires are up to a 1500mile trip. If they are close to 5k, you might want to think about a new rear at the very least. I've been caught out setting off with not enough rear tread and had to pay through the nose to get a new rear in BFE.

And to add an old cliche, its not the destination, its the getting there, so take a camera, & charger and post pics of your trip here.

Machog


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post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2009, 01:26 AM
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I am a Cabela's fanatic. I just got back from my first 1,600 mile trip, and I think all my hiking gear bought from Cabela's worked just fine.

I went with a compact/compressible sleeping bag, a lightweight 2 person tent, a compressible pillow, and a compact floor mat all in one 36" wet bag. I strap that to the passenger seat with bungee cords, and have saddle bags and a rear trunk. One of the saddle bags holds my clothes for about 4 days max, the other saddle bag has my bottle of water, thermos, parts, tools, first aid kit, etc. The trunk can be used for my laptop, extra jacket and raingear.

I do want to take my coffee pot and burner on the next trip and I have room for it.

The V really does not know there is weight there. I am still surprised at the performance.

I did follow the advice and go on a weekend trip or two to see what I needed and what I didn't. It is very informative! Even after my long trip I have a few adjustments I'm going to make for the next trip.

Have fun on your journey and let us know how it goes!
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post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2009, 02:17 AM
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While I absolutely love camping, another option is self-catering accommodation.. forest cabin's, beach bungalows etc. I am sure you have that type of option in the States. At least you are not in a crowded hotel environment and generally closer to nature but dont have to carry cooking gear, bedding etc, and still have the luxury of a private shower, warm bed, shelter from rain and power. We opt for this when 2up and buy our "groceries" for the evening and next morning during our travelling day. Its definitely about the journey and we generally plan a round trip with as many stops and stays along the way, rather than a specific destination.

hope you have a fabulous trip!

"Only dead fish go with the flow"
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post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2009, 05:22 AM
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When packing for a trip I work from a list because there are so many little things to remember it's easy to omit something which will be greatly missed while on the road. I'll try to attach it to this post but my computer skills are weak, so if it doesn't work and you are interested you can PM me and I'll send it to you in an e-mail. Basically, my approach is very similar to the one described by Machog except I don't use a camelback. I like to stop and stretch regularly anyway so a water bottle in the saddle bag is good enough for me - just have to remember to drink it! Have a good trip. It is absolutely the best way to travel.

(I just tried to attach my file, it won't work, so PM if interested.)
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post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2009, 06:13 AM
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While I was home I spent a few days in the Black Hills and I opted for hotel/motel and eating out along the way. It was a spur of the moment thing and all my gear was in NC. The cost will go up when you do this but if you have the extra money than why not. If I was going to plan something out I would definately go the camping route. If you are going in the fall I dont think Yellowstone would be that crowded and the freedom of manuver will be a lot better as will the camp sites. If you do camp out make sure to bring a very warm sleep system/ bag as I've seen accumilated snow in the Bighorns in late July and froze my arse off while camping in Yellowstone during the same time frame. I try not to plan everything so I can add to the adventure though.
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post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2009, 07:15 AM
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There's so much high quality backpacker's gear out there that I don't know where to start. My tent is an MSR Hubba Hubba, which I highly recommend. I have used this tent in crazy west coast storms with no water inside the tent. It's really easy to set up and scrunches down to almost nothing. I have a one man tent as well but rarely use it anymore since the Hubba Hubba takes up less space in a pack. I have a down sleeping bag and a Mountain Hardwear Ultralamina 32. The Ultralamina is a really good bag and is synthetic so it doesn't matter if it gets a little wet. I use a 3/4 Thermarest mattress and a stuff sack with fuzzy stuff on the inside for a pillow (turn it inside out and stuff it full of clothes).

For clothing, I leave the cotton at home. Polyester rules. It doesn't retain moisture. You can wash a polyester T shirt in the sink and it dries in a matter of minutes. You don't need expensive brands like Under Armor or Nike. Polyester is polyester. In Canada we can buy a recycled polyester T-shirt for fifteen bucks at Mountain Equipment Co-op. For pants, I use polyester/nylon convertibles with zip-off legs. For shoes, flip-flops or sandals. I have a single ply Gore Tex jacket and leave my useless zip-in liner for my riding jacket at home.

I take a Patagonia down filled sweater which is very lightweight and extremely warm. It's good for the morning chill and for colder riding days. As an alternative you can take a good wool sweater. I have bought Merino wool sweaters at the Salvation Army thrift shop for five bucks that look brand new. The advantage to the five buck sweater is that you don't care about campfire burns.

For cooking, any hiker's stove will work for one-pot meals. Buy your groceries on the fly and throw in a couple of Ichiban noodles just for the heck of it. I buy pre-cooked bacon and it tastes great in the morning, even cold. For coffee, I use a French press in the cup.

With lightweight gear, I am able to pack everything I need for a road trip in a 46 liter top case and a small duffel bag lashed to the passenger's seat. We tend to overpack. Backpackers know that we will fill up a pack no matter how big it is. It's a matter of asking, "Do I really need this?" Except for emergency gear, when in doubt leave it at home.

Last edited by charly; 07-21-2009 at 07:18 AM.
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post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2009, 09:35 AM
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3000 miles in 8.5 days

I just fininished a trip last Saturday with two of my friends that was a 3000 mile loop from Cincinnati to Lake Placid, NY, down the Blue Ridge Parkway to the Tail of the dragon and the Smokies. We camped 5 of the 8 nights. It was supposed to be 6 but we were flexible and got a cabin on the rainiest night of the trip. That was a good move. Advice: Pack light. We each had a backpacker's tent, sleeping bag and air sleeping pad to keep the weight down.
I had a small tool kit just in case and then my clothes, raingear, etc. Take some cool weather gear for the high altitudes. We needed it. Make sure your tires have enough tread. We came back and two of the bikes had nearly bald tires. Had we hit any significant rain on the way back, it would have been a problem. Be Flexible, have fun, take a camera, take photos and enjoy the ride!
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post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2009, 09:58 AM
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I backpack, go 4X4 and windsurf in my other life. So I don't need to do any of this while on the moto. I tend to motel it all the way. So, if you're a die-hard camper, just move along, don't read this anymore...

At the onset of each trip, I have a vague destination in mind, but there are generally two immediate objectives on a moto trip: ride the twisty blue routes and sample food. Yep, I'm trying to reprise the Food Network episodes of Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.

So, I start off the day relatively early, to avoid the suicidal bugs and traffic. At the first gas stop, I'll inquire about a breakfast/brunch place. So far, I've not missed many chicken-fried steak & eggs. They were all good. These small town gas station folks don't lie. I'll miss lunch, or just eat an apple: must keep under the V's GVWR.

Then, in late afternoon while there is still day light, I'll arrive at a small burg with motels. It really doesn't matter what chain it is, as long as there's a shower and a firm bed. I check the bed compliance first. Of course, if it's nippy, a hot tub would also be a desired option.

I then ask the motel clerk about places to eat. Just like the gas station crew, these people know their town. They're so honest that one actually sent me out of town to get a decent bite. I also inquire about their local Dew-Drop-Inns, preferably within walking distance from the motel. I get a good meal, then go to the bar to hear local chit-chat. You'll be surprised at how friendly people get when they get a free beer from an Oriental from out of town. Oh yeah, it's bonus that this Asian actually speaks understandable English. All manner of conversation would ensue, and I get better entertainment than sitting in the Magic-Fingers bed watching porno. After learning about the town history and assorted opinions about mankind in general, I shuffle back to the motel for a good night sleep.

Get up the next morning, repeat.

Peter
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post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2009, 10:21 AM
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guess i would just add that overpacking clothes is easy to do..spent two weeks on the road, packed a weeks worth of clothes never thinking i might want to buy a few t-shirts along the way...my bag felt like it weighed 100 lbs.. by tghe time i got home..packe light and bring old clothes..that way you dont care if you tear them or stain them
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post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2009, 10:27 AM
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Originally Posted by psc View Post
I backpack, go 4X4 and windsurf in my other life. So I don't need to do any of this while on the moto. I tend to motel it all the way. So, if you're a die-hard camper, just move along, don't read this anymore...

At the onset of each trip, I have a vague destination in mind, but there are generally two immediate objectives on a moto trip: ride the twisty blue routes and sample food. Yep, I'm trying to reprise the Food Network episodes of Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.

So, I start off the day relatively early, to avoid the suicidal bugs and traffic. At the first gas stop, I'll inquire about a breakfast/brunch place. So far, I've not missed many chicken-fried steak & eggs. They were all good. These small town gas station folks don't lie. I'll miss lunch, or just eat an apple: must keep under the V's GVWR.
Then, in late afternoon while there is still day light, I'll arrive at a small burg with motels. It really doesn't matter what chain it is, as long as there's a shower and a firm bed. I check the bed compliance first. Of course, if it's nippy, a hot tub would also be a desired option.

I then ask the motel clerk about places to eat. Just like the gas station crew, these people know their town. They're so honest that one actually sent me out of town to get a decent bite. I also inquire about their local Dew-Drop-Inns, preferably within walking distance from the motel. I get a good meal, then go to the bar to hear local chit-chat. You'll be surprised at how friendly people get when they get a free beer from an Oriental from out of town. Oh yeah, it's bonus that this Asian actually speaks understandable English. All manner of conversation would ensue, and I get better entertainment than sitting in the Magic-Fingers bed watching porno. After learning about the town history and assorted opinions about mankind in general, I shuffle back to the motel for a good night sleep.

Get up the next morning, repeat.

Peter

Ahhh Peter you are obviously a civilized traveler and a very sensible gentleman.
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post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2009, 12:10 PM
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It takes time to camp. You need to let things dry out in the morning. In the evening you need to set up camp before it gets dark. I once planned a long trip and underestimated the time required for camping. After one night I realized I wasn't going to complete the trip unless I rode from dawn to dusk and stayed in motels. I ended up hauling all of my camping gear for thousands of miles without using it again. Great trip though. My mantra was "If you're not having fun you need to be on a smaller road." I avoided freeways and major highways for almost 5 thousand miles.

On that trip I was doing 650 miles a day. I like camping when I'm only going about 300 miles a day.

"Veni, Vidi, Velcro"-- I came, I saw, I stuck around.
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post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2009, 02:32 PM
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Ahhh Peter you are obviously a civilized traveler and a very sensible gentleman.
Well, I don't know about civilized. But this is vacation, no?

Oh yeah, speaking of sensible, I always bring polypro undies and T-shirts, 3 of each; so that I can wash one pair in the motel bathroom and hang dry over night. In that case, I never have dirty clothes, only monotonous colors.

And now that I've attached a tractor manual canister under the V, I can carry a bottle of Laphroaig safely and in style. That's civilized.

Peter
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post #16 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-22-2009, 02:42 PM
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Well, I haven't taken any long trips yet, but I have two suggestions for you.

Firstly, read up on gear and strategies at advrider.com. There are some extremely knowledgable guys over there, and they are almost all really nice. Haven't asked a question and not gotten a good answer.

Second, http://www.onebag.com/ has some great strategies for packing light. I have been following their tips and have GREATLY reduced the load I carry.

Third, buy convertible pants, such as the ones from North Face. So nice, and I only had to pack them instead of a pair of jeans and a pair of shorts.

Ok, so I guess that was three suggestions.....
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post #17 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-22-2009, 05:09 PM
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post #18 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-23-2009, 07:36 PM Thread Starter
 
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Wow I did not expect such thorough replies!! All advice has been considered and I learned some great tips! I now know why I like this forum so much you guys are awesome and thanks for your help. I am extremely excited to take my first long trip and the planning has already begun. And definitly will be taking tons of pictures when I go and you will all see them. Thanks Again!
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post #19 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-23-2009, 09:18 PM
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1. I have a Jetboil. Great for coffee, soup, ect, packs small.
2. Small 12v a/c and plug kit.
3. Thermarest self inflating air pad and sleeping bag.
4. Small $25 tent works just fine.
5. I pack heat for security (optional).

After coffee and packing up, I will eat a fairly large breakfast. This usually satisfies me for the entire day. The 1 or 2 day trial run is a good suggestion. Take your time, have fun, take pics.
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post #20 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-26-2009, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by bendevries View Post
I am planning on taking my V for a 1500 mile trip to Yellowstone this fall and it will be my first big adventure on motorcycle. I have heard about people that camp on their trips and people that stay in hotels. I am just wondering how you do your long trips, like where you stay and how you do your meals. Do you eat out everywhere you go or cook over the campfire. Any advice or stories that would prepare me for my big adventure would be greatly appreciated.
I no longer camp,it has for me lost its allure , my old body just doesn't want to.Also you have to pack a tent,bags ect ect and it eats up a LOT of luggage space on a long tour,that is better used for other sundry items such as riding gear for a wide tempature range. I motel and generally eat at mom and pop places if I can find them near my chosen motel. I use resorces like roadfood .com and a resouce from my brethern at STN> my advice is to try to set a distance goal for yourself for each day and try to stick to it.Always leave more time to sightsee than you think as if you get on too tight a schedule it makes the trip a chore not an adventure,and leave wiggle room for those unexpected side trips.I do a LOT of long distance touring and these rules of the road have worked well over 30++ years of touring

. And stop fairly often,even if to grab a juice drink (keep your potassium up to avoid cramping) and stay hydrated!!!!

AMA EAA STN
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