Heated vs. Non-Heated - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-28-2015, 10:09 AM Thread Starter
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Question Heated vs. Non-Heated

Hi
days are getting shorter here in the frozen north and i'm starting to think about where the bike goes this year when snow flies (yes i said snow, not that i want it to come anytime soon)

for previous years i stored the bike in my neighbors garage (non-heated, but insulated and attached and thus no freezing). Buddy moved out of the 'hood.

I have access to another garage with no heat, cold as morgue in the winter but dry and secure.

question is, what are the issues when storing properly winterized bike (fluids, oil, fogging .... etc) in cold storage?
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-28-2015, 10:19 AM
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battery death unless on a trickle charger
mice chewing on wires
everything else should be fine
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-28-2015, 10:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kohburn View Post
battery death unless on a trickle charger
mice chewing on wires
everything else should be fine
^^^^ THIS

My Uly had the rear taillight wires almost completely chewed through by mice. Its the only thing they ever bothered.

I once popped off the seat on a cold winters day to find 2 mice who were in absolutely no hurry to move from the comfy slumber. Could of sworn I seen one yawn.
trickle Charger, also important. Although for me, Im on the fringes, as I rarely go more than 1.5 weeks without at least a brief ride.

we dont often get a frigid cold here in the The Carolinas (mountains do however) SO I usually suffer through a 35 degree ride to work to have a nice 55 degree sunny ride home.
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-28-2015, 10:52 AM Thread Starter
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i always take the battery out anyway so that one is solved
the second? ... perhaps when traps are on sale at walymart i can create a nice pentagram around the bike ...
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-28-2015, 11:11 AM
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As mentioned, keep the battery on a charger (a good one that senses the battery condition so it shuts off and on as needed).
Put in some gas treatment like Sta-bil and run it a little with the treatment to circulate it through the system. Even if you run the gas out of it, there will still be some in there someplace.
mice can be an issue depending on what type of building the bike is in. Put some moth balls under the seat. Put a few in a sock and stuff it behind the headlight and under the gas tank.
make sure your antifreeze is good for the temps it will see.
I'm not sure what draws mice to chew on the electrical system, maybe removing the battery would take care of two problems, I don't know.
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-28-2015, 11:57 AM
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sta-bil is terrible, use pri-g

as for long term mouse trap.. google mouse trap bucket. diy and lasts until the bucket is full. lol


Last edited by kohburn; 09-28-2015 at 12:02 PM.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-28-2015, 12:02 PM
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last year i stored mine in my living room and its what i plan to do again this year

yes im a guy.
Silvie=latin for. Of the forest /woods. Fox= Vulpine (also my middle name)

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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-28-2015, 12:05 PM
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sta-bil is terrible, use pri-g

as for long term mouse trap.. google mouse trap bucket. diy and lasts until the bucket is full. lol

You could put chicken or beef broth in the bucket and make stew.
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-28-2015, 05:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pecko View Post
...I have access to another garage with no heat, cold as morgue in the winter but dry and secure.

question is, what are the issues when storing properly winterized bike (fluids, oil, fogging .... etc) in cold storage?
I start by washing the bike so that ALL bugs are gone; then I've always filled the gas tank w/ Stabil added (then ridden home so the Stabil gets throughout the fuel system); removed the battery (which I put on the workbench w/ a Schumacher 'float-battery-charger' connected thru a 24 hour timer, set for 15 minutes per 24 hrs); inflated tires to 36F/ 42R; then put the bike onto stands so that BOTH tires are off the ground.

NEVER had a mouse problem (), but I've heard that putting 'mothballs' around it keeps them away...?

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You could put chicken or beef broth in the bucket and make stew.
ray - you one SICK puppy...!


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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-29-2015, 10:38 AM
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Personally not a fan of gas treatments....but here is what I do and it has served me well for many collector cars over the years.

First not heated make sure the anti-freeze is up to snuff....if it has been a year or so I would replace it. It will turn acidic in time....it is also my view that smaller systems (like a bike) it happens faster as there is just less volume there....but that is just me.

Battery maintainer yea, but pull the leads off the battery...again IMHO.

Mice, I would not worry too much, they tend to like tight spaces to keep warm and a bike just does not have that much area to hide in....sure it will happen but not a real big problem....if you worry about it moth balls work well all winter long.

For the gas FILL as in all the way up the tank with a good fuel that does not have any ethanol in it....in fact during the riding season I will put about every 3-4 tank with "good real gas" just to get that crap out of the fuel system....you might find you get better gas mileage as well as real gas does have more energy in it over the other crap. You should on paper get about 4% more MPG with real gas. The reason you want the tank FULL is the fuel will want to lose moisture, that moisture will collect on the top of the tank and you can get rust....yea I know only a few months over the winter, but you never know if you will fall on your a$$ and bust something....next thing you know it is a year or more later and you have issues.

Just my two bits....and for good reading on this and other stuff like this check out bobstheoilguy for good info along this line.

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post #11 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-29-2015, 11:36 AM
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My routine is to change the oil, fill up with gas w/Stabil, lower the pressure in the tires a bit, place a plastic bag over the exhaust, and remove the battery. Only time I had an issue was in 2001...temperature dipped to -45 celcius in the garage, and I was treated to a gas snow cone hanging off of the gas tank (XR250L)...the gas in the tank froze. Not sure what I did wrong, but I had to replace the tank.

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post #12 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-29-2015, 12:06 PM
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- Wash bike to remove road salt and other gunk
- Add some Stabil and fill the tank and run the treated gas through the engine, this with prevent condensation in the gas tank
- Lube the chain, this will prevent the chain rusting
- You can mist anything that might get rusted with WD-40 like brake rotors and frame
- Change the oil and filter
- Remove the battery and store it inside and charge it every 2 months or so on a trickle charger to keep it topped up.

That's about all I do and never seem to have any issues and it always starts on the first try next spring. Don't usually stop riding till late November. I find warm gear makes it comfortable riding in cold weather.

Last edited by twowheels; 09-29-2015 at 12:10 PM.
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post #13 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-01-2015, 09:02 AM
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All good points. Need some explanations?

Wash Bike - removes all bug guts and dirt. Bug guts can attract rodents and live insects. A lot of 'dirt' is pollen and other organic matter, and organic dirt is especially bad for attracting moisture and turning acidic. Even inorganic dirt can attract and/or trap moisture and cause corrosion. I've sometimes waxed the bike - and left the wax on over the winter, wiped it down in the spring. Nice shiny spring bike. One thing about doing this - I am always amazed at the amount of wax that has gone missing at rub/garage rash points. Would otherwise be rubbing on the paint.

Lube everything that needs lube. Especially the chain and cables, and any other moving points. Same deal, prevents corrosion.

Change the oil. Run the bike for a bit to circulate it. Get the bike up to operating temp to burn out any moisture. Store the bike with fresh oil in the crank. Fresh oil has fresh additives that will prevent corrosion in the engine. As the bike sits in the unheated garage, it will be subject to heat/cool cycles, and varying degrees of humidity. As the engine 'breathes', it can suck in humid air, and when the temp drops, the water can drop out into the oil. Fresh oil will capture the water and keep the environment pH neutral.

For the gas tank, add some gas stabilizer, with fresh gas (again, fresh gas = fresh additives) all the way to the top. Run the bike for a bit (concurrent to running it after the oil change) to get some stabilised fuel into the injection system. For the same reason as above - the tank will breathe, and any humid air contains water. Gas stabiliser should grab that and keep the environment pH neutral. Reason for full tank - corrosion will occur most often at interfaces, like gasoline/free water interface in the bottom of the tank - or the air/gasoline interface at the top. Keep the interface area as small as possible. Full tank = smallest interface possible.

Check the coolant. Top up, replace if necessary. If you find it needs replacing, do it now, don't let it sit with dead coolant over the winter. Same reason - fresh coolant=fresh additives.

My battery comes out of the bike, and goes on a peak/trickle charger with a timer (30 minutes charge/day) on the bench in the house. And not a cheap charger. Don't like chargers hooked up to a battery still attached to a bike. The voltage coming out of some cheap chargers is pretty spiky, not good for the ECU. It's a trust vs. cost thing.

I up the air pressure in the tires to a couple of pounds more than usual. Up on at least the rear pit stand, since the Versys has no centre stand...

Cover the bike with a light cotton bedsheet, cloth bag draped over the exhaust outlet, couple of mothballs and a mousetrap on the floor under the bike.

Then - resist the urge to start it over the winter! Starting it creates moisture throughout the engine and exhaust, and unless you get the bike up to operating temp - that water just lays in there and causes trouble.

Might be a bit of overkill, but I've been doing this with my bikes (and cars) for 45 years now, Never had trouble in the spring with any of them.

Last edited by visitor zero; 10-01-2015 at 09:05 AM.
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post #14 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-01-2015, 10:29 AM
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Overkill? Not in the least, it's systemic!

Having ridden year round most of my life though, it's just a bummer to consider you are not riding a bike. The Chinese may be helping you out though by warming our planet up thousands of years in advance in about a 20 year span with no pollution standards what so ever.

I can't imagine what the weather will be like in 20 more years anywhere: poles are shifting



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All good points. Need some explanations?

Wash Bike - removes all bug guts and dirt. Bug guts can attract rodents and live insects. A lot of 'dirt' is pollen and other organic matter, and organic dirt is especially bad for attracting moisture and turning acidic. Even inorganic dirt can attract and/or trap moisture and cause corrosion. I've sometimes waxed the bike - and left the wax on over the winter, wiped it down in the spring. Nice shiny spring bike. One thing about doing this - I am always amazed at the amount of wax that has gone missing at rub/garage rash points. Would otherwise be rubbing on the paint.

Lube everything that needs lube. Especially the chain and cables, and any other moving points. Same deal, prevents corrosion.

Change the oil. Run the bike for a bit to circulate it. Get the bike up to operating temp to burn out any moisture. Store the bike with fresh oil in the crank. Fresh oil has fresh additives that will prevent corrosion in the engine. As the bike sits in the unheated garage, it will be subject to heat/cool cycles, and varying degrees of humidity. As the engine 'breathes', it can suck in humid air, and when the temp drops, the water can drop out into the oil. Fresh oil will capture the water and keep the environment pH neutral.

For the gas tank, add some gas stabilizer, with fresh gas (again, fresh gas = fresh additives) all the way to the top. Run the bike for a bit (concurrent to running it after the oil change) to get some stabilised fuel into the injection system. For the same reason as above - the tank will breathe, and any humid air contains water. Gas stabiliser should grab that and keep the environment pH neutral. Reason for full tank - corrosion will occur most often at interfaces, like gasoline/free water interface in the bottom of the tank - or the air/gasoline interface at the top. Keep the interface area as small as possible. Full tank = smallest interface possible.

Check the coolant. Top up, replace if necessary. If you find it needs replacing, do it now, don't let it sit with dead coolant over the winter. Same reason - fresh coolant=fresh additives.

My battery comes out of the bike, and goes on a peak/trickle charger with a timer (30 minutes charge/day) on the bench in the house. And not a cheap charger. Don't like chargers hooked up to a battery still attached to a bike. The voltage coming out of some cheap chargers is pretty spiky, not good for the ECU. It's a trust vs. cost thing.

I up the air pressure in the tires to a couple of pounds more than usual. Up on at least the rear pit stand, since the Versys has no centre stand...

Cover the bike with a light cotton bedsheet, cloth bag draped over the exhaust outlet, couple of mothballs and a mousetrap on the floor under the bike.

Then - resist the urge to start it over the winter! Starting it creates moisture throughout the engine and exhaust, and unless you get the bike up to operating temp - that water just lays in there and causes trouble.

Might be a bit of overkill, but I've been doing this with my bikes (and cars) for 45 years now, Never had trouble in the spring with any of them.
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post #15 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-01-2015, 02:58 PM
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At the end of the riding season, changing the oil is the last thing I do. I don't start the engine until Spring. Less contaminants sitting in the oil for 5 months that way. It makes a difference.
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