For you electrical folks! - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-25-2008, 05:22 PM Thread Starter
 
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For you electrical folks!

I'd eventually like to hook up a few electrical accessories to the V (driving lights, maybe some accessory lights, an outlet to hook up navigational equipment, etc.) and was taking a look under the seat when I found these guys:

auxiliary.jpg

I'm guessing the red arrow points to an "accessory power line" but I have no idea what the thing in the blue circle is! I'm wondering if I can potentially hook up an auxiliary fuse box and/or relay to the potential "accessory power line" (If that is, in fact, what it is)? And any thoughts on the doo-dad in the blue circle would be greatly appreciated!
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-25-2008, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Boiler97 View Post
I'd eventually like to hook up a few electrical accessories to the V (driving lights, maybe some accessory lights, an outlet to hook up navigational equipment, etc.) and was taking a look under the seat when I found these guys:

Attachment 515

I'm guessing the red arrow points to an "accessory power line" but I have no idea what the thing in the blue circle is! I'm wondering if I can potentially hook up an auxiliary fuse box and/or relay to the potential "accessory power line" (If that is, in fact, what it is)? And any thoughts on the doo-dad in the blue circle would be greatly appreciated!


5. Kawasaki Self-diagnosis System Connector (Insert the connector to the bracket.)
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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-25-2008, 07:00 PM Thread Starter
 
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Sexy! Thanks for the clarification!
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-25-2008, 10:10 PM
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The best way to go is to install a fuse block.

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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-26-2008, 06:01 AM
 
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The best way to go is to install a fuse block.
x2. Definitely the way to go.
.
.
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-28-2008, 03:49 PM
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x3 on the fuse block.
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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-01-2008, 11:41 AM
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5 Volt Jumper?

What's the little wire do though in front of the self diagnostic plug? I get 5 volts on mine. I just installed this fuse box. Needed for the Starcom 1 system and driving lights.

Last edited by reedster1200; 07-09-2010 at 12:26 PM.
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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-01-2008, 07:40 PM
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I'm guessing the red arrow points to an "accessory power line" but I have no idea what the thing in the blue circle is!
Both are part of the self-diagnosis system. The large connector (circled in blue) is what you use if you have Kawasaki's fancy computer program and hookup cable. The single connector (with the arrow pointing to it) is what you use at home, you ground that and read the codes off the instrument panel (section 3-35 in the manual). It would be a bad idea to use either for your accessory power source.


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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-01-2008, 08:57 PM
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Question

So where would be the ideal place to tap into as a power supply?
I've never done this before so any help would be cool, but I'm looking into hoking up a car style lighter somewhere on the bike, so that can charge cell phone or gps etc...
anyone wanna step by step me through an example run?


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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-02-2008, 03:29 AM
 
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This is a generic explanation. I do not own a Versys, but used this procedure on my Honda and it worked great.

1. locate a 12VDC circuit that is controlled by the ignition circuit. Such as the headlights. They only come on when the ignition switch is turned on.
2. Tap this circuit and connect to one side of the coil on a 30Amp 12VDC relay. Connect the other side of the relay coil to a ground point.
3. Connect directly from the 12VDC pole of the battery to one side on an inline fuse for about 15 or 20 amps. Connect the other lead from the fuse to one side to one side of the "Switched" contacts of the relay. Connect the other side of the relay to the 12VDC pole of an auxilary fuse box. (these are available in all auto parts stores, just ask).
4. Install an appropriate sized fuse into the fuse block for the necessary power draw of the component you are hooking up. Run the connection for that fuse to the component you are hooking up. Run the component's negative terminal to ground. That "component" could be a cigarette lighter socket.

This way you have a fuse protecting the relay and the fuse block. Individual fuses protect individual components. The ignition switch, when turned off protects the battery from being depleted if a component is left turned on.

Remember that the total AMPERAGE you can draw on this Aux fuse block cannot exceed the excess output of the alternator or you will draw the battery down to the point that bad things happen.

Hope this helps.

Red
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post #11 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-19-2008, 05:48 PM
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There are two other posts addressing the addition of a 12 volt power outlet to the Versys and including mounting ideas. Search the other forums for those threads.
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post #12 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-19-2008, 09:36 PM
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Red Alert has it right. You should hook the primary side of a 30 Amp relay to an ignition-switched power source. I use the tail-light. I then hook (through an inline fuse) the secondary input to the relay directly to the battery. All the accessory power needed is tapped off the secondary output from the relay. This way the accessories only have power when the ignition is on, and all are protected by the fuse. -- Hank.
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post #13 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-19-2011, 03:47 PM
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Thanks as usual for the info in these posts. I am at last getting round to sorting power ror accessories. The attached wiring diagram seems to follow the guidance on this thread and may help anyone else on the same mission.
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post #14 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-19-2011, 04:09 PM
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Several folks on this Forum have used the FZ-1 fuze block: http://www.fuzeblocks.com/index.php

There are threads describing the results. I personally have used it with great success on both an 09 V and a 10V. Red Alert's discussion applies directly. Also get good instructions with the FZ-1. I used the low-beam headlight as the relay trigger.
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post #15 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-19-2011, 04:20 PM
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Pretty much any 20A automotive relay connected to the battery via a 20A fuse and a a cheap terminal block of your choosing will provide the required functionality and provide switched power (cuts off when engine is turned off). Total cost ~$10.


Note all automotive relays have the same pin numberings marked on them.

Pin 30 - connects to pos battery terminal via 20A or less fuse (high current)
Pin 87 - switched distribution power source (high current) - to terminal block
Pin 85 - relay trigger ground (low current)
Pin 86 - relay trigger positive - wire to any switched 12v source like running lights that are only on with engine running (low current)


Suggest using 12 gauge wire for high current wires (it is good for up to 40A) which is more than will ever be needed. Any thin wire wire can be used to trigger the relay. Also solder rather than just twist all connections and wrap with electrical tape. When soldering heat the wires to be soldered until solder touching the wires (and not the soldering iron) melts into the wires. Installing a 20A fuse between battery and relay is a good idea. Twisted wire connections tend to be a source of power loss and possible failure point.

Last edited by twowheels; 11-19-2011 at 04:49 PM.
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post #16 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-19-2011, 10:24 PM
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It depends on the type of insulation but 40 amps is kinda high for 12 gauge even for the good stuff unless its a single strand in open air. For bundled installations Id fuse 12 gauge to 25 or 30 amps at the most.
.

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post #17 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-20-2011, 08:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twowheels View Post
Also solder rather than just twist all connections and wrap with electrical tape. When soldering heat the wires to be soldered until solder touching the wires (and not the soldering iron) melts into the wires. Installing a 20A fuse between battery and relay is a good idea. Twisted wire connections tend to be a source of power loss and possible failure point.

This is an EXCELLENT point. Run voltage drop tests on several different electrical farkles, and note the differences between clean connections and weathered, twisted-wire connections. You might be very surprised at the results.


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Last edited by chornbe; 11-20-2011 at 09:11 PM.
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post #18 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-01-2011, 02:48 PM
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A bit late to the party, but I've been very happy with my Centech fuse panel for adding accessories. I think it's slightly cheaper than the Fuze, but haven't done any serious price comparison.

http://www.centechwire.com/catalog/panels/ap1.shtml


On more tip about soldering connections: I've found that heat shrink tubing wrap works really well for sealing up soldered wires. Electrical tape can get less sticky with age whereas this shrink wrap seems to hold up pretty well. All you need is a heat gun/hair dryer to shrink it down over the connection and you're good to go!!

Here's an example of what I'm talking about. Just remember to feed it on before you solder or connect everything up!

http://www.amazon.com/Anytime-SHRINK-TUBING-SLEEVES-ASSORTED/dp/B000F7RB4Q/ref=pd_cp_hi_1
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post #19 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-01-2011, 03:00 PM
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http://easternbeaver.com/Main/Produc...3_circuit.html

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post #20 of 24 (permalink) Old 12-01-2011, 06:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornbe View Post
This is an EXCELLENT point. Run voltage drop tests on several different electrical farkles, and note the differences between clean connections and weathered, twisted-wire connections. You might be very surprised at the results.

Don't listen to this guy, he doesn't know anything.

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