2nd Gear Starts - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-30-2010, 08:53 AM Thread Starter
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2nd Gear Starts

Pandoras box maybe.......but ive been starting in secound gear...alot. This habbit started with the stock 46 tooth sprocket and has carried over to the 44. First gear was just a pain to get into just before a stop and i really wanted to get a little more speed before my first shift. Im 160 pounds and dont think it hurts a thing. But lets hear what you have to say......
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-30-2010, 09:00 AM
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don't understand why you'd want to start off in second. shouldn't need to change down to first prior to stopping, you could block shift down to first once stopped.

as to starting in second.. thats an extra load on the clutch, engine and gearbox, but then again its your clutch, engine and gearbox, your choice... I pity the poor sod who buys your bike second hand though....
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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-30-2010, 09:41 AM
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stock - did the same all the time. 1st is quite high unless need the speed. 16t dont do as much except if caught between 1st/2nd speeds. Gearbox/clutch will be fine, barely need to slip the clutch more than if in 1st.
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-30-2010, 09:58 PM
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I don't believe you'll have any problems in the long run.
FYI, it is possible to start the V off in as high as 4th gear, don't ask me how I know!

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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-13-2010, 12:09 AM Thread Starter
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4th gear starts..........maybe i have done that a time or two. the last few weeks ive been skipping gears like from 2nd click click right to fourth then two click on into 6th. must be my age. i dont know i read in a mag once this bike likes to get right to 6th gear and i agree. i do love this thing or maybe its a love hate thing.
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-13-2010, 02:42 AM
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Any reason you are not starting out with 1st gear???

To me, part of the fun of riding a motorcycle is shifting through the gears... Up and down... And she goes...

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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-13-2010, 04:49 AM
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Yep, the real fun IMO is using the gears more brakes less especially on twisty roads
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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-13-2010, 06:22 AM
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If you're concerned with saving the gearbox, up-shift without using the clutch at all. Saves on a bunch oh mechanical parts. Smoothest shifts you'll ever make.
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-13-2010, 10:26 AM
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I agree that (if done properly) clutchless shifting wouldn’t be too detrimental to the transmission... but how can NOT using the clutch (NOT disengaging the engine from the drive train) possibly reduce shock/load/wear on the transmission – or any other component (other than the clutch itself)?
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-13-2010, 05:10 PM
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Is that not part of the skill/fun of riding, using clutch, brakes and throttle in a coordinated manner to get the best out of engine braking into a corner, accerating through and out of a corner etc. I presume when riding my bike that it is designed to be able take my rapid shifts up and down through gears as long as I am not red lining or labouring the engine it will do fine.
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post #11 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-13-2010, 05:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardware View Post
I agree that (if done properly) clutchless shifting wouldnít be too detrimental to the transmission... but how can NOT using the clutch (NOT disengaging the engine from the drive train) possibly reduce shock/load/wear on the transmission Ė or any other component (other than the clutch itself)?
.
Did it in one of Lee Park's classes, taught by the man himself. All the gears are always meshed it's just that only some of them are transferring the power. After shifting into first gear with the clutch, letting the motor rev to 5-7000 rpm, quickly ease off the throttle and up shift one gear-no clutch! Done right, it will feel like your bike is an automatic. In the meanwhile, you haven't used your clutch or shift fork and other things. It's less detrimental. It's not something you use every time and it's scary the first time but once you do it you wish you could shift like that always. Believe me, if I didn't have a professional racer tell me to do it, I wouldn't believe it either.
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post #12 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-13-2010, 06:39 PM
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Itís one thing to use this method on the track where shaving seconds off a lap time is paramount and the machineís going to get seasonal teardowns anyway... but itís quite another to be doing it regularly on the street for no real gain. Personally Iíd rather change a dozen clutch cables than one shift fork (and you most certainly are using the shift forks... and the drum...).
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post #13 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-13-2010, 07:32 PM
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Learned to upshift with no clutch driving an 18 wheeler I found how to do it in the V by accident. However, throttle, clutch, shift coordination is automatic no need to think about it.
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post #14 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-13-2010, 08:08 PM
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Many years ago I lost the clutch linkage in my big block ĎVette and had to make the 60 mile drive home clutchless. It wasnít too bad except for the few times I had to stop... well actually the stopping wasnít bad... just slipped it into neutral... but to get going again I had to shut it off, put it in gear, and then start it. Ya just had to love those old Muncie trannys
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post #15 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-13-2010, 08:21 PM
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I somtimes upshift with out clutch but that is more because am being lazy
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post #16 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-14-2010, 12:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boricua View Post
Learned to upshift with no clutch driving an 18 wheeler I found how to do it in the V by accident. However, throttle, clutch, shift coordination is automatic no need to think about it.
Same here, I learned to upshift and downshift driving truck. Always use the clutch on the V though, haven't tried no clutch. I don't have a mechanical opinion but I enjoy the whole thing, throttle, clutch and shifting, makes it more interesting.

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post #17 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-14-2010, 03:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardware View Post
Itís one thing to use this method on the track where shaving seconds off a lap time is paramount and the machineís going to get seasonal teardowns anyway... but itís quite another to be doing it regularly on the street for no real gain. Personally Iíd rather change a dozen clutch cables than one shift fork (and you most certainly are using the shift forks... and the drum...).
.
+1

And you can actually overall spend more time getting perfect clutchless changes than you save, as it doesnt take many very slightly mistimed shifts to round the dogs. to the point, that one day even with gentle use with the clutch, suddenly the box can fail. ( Potenitally wrecking the engine in the process)

I dont particaulry like doing it on the track, having to pull gearboxes (non cassette) is a pain.
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post #18 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-14-2010, 02:23 PM
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Yeah but our gears can be removed without splitting the case.
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post #19 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-14-2010, 02:29 PM
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Thanks for this, I wondered about clutchless shifts. Sounds like it's not a good idea. I
keep my clutch adjustment as far out as possible to disengage properly (as most probably do) so I only stretch the cable a little to shift, and hope this will extend my cable life.

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post #20 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-14-2010, 02:59 PM
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Quote:
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I keep my clutch adjustment as far out as possible to disengage properly ... so I only stretch the cable a little to shift, and hope this will extend my cable life.
You donít want to go out too far... If it doesnít have adequate free play it wonít engage properly.

Route the cable well, i.e., without any sharp bends, kinks, binding, etc. and lube it occasionally with something like Triflow or BreakFree and itíll last for many years (the cable on my Shadow currently has 65,000 miles of back road riding on it and itís still fine).

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