Nitrogen - Kawasaki Versys Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-12-2008, 08:37 PM Thread Starter
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Nitrogen

Has anyone put nitrogen in their tires? I have considered it but can't find much on it as to whether or not it would or would not be a hazard. I am thinking there should be no difference. You can google it and find tons of information, but I am looking for someone with some personal experience not the theory of it.

I can't help I am not on of the Sheeple.

Last edited by motorbum; 07-12-2008 at 08:47 PM.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-12-2008, 10:32 PM
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Why would you??



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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2008, 02:33 AM Thread Starter
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The question is does it make a difference as far as slowing air leakage and the regular hype that comes with it. It's not really something that's worth debating. Why would you use zip ties? Probably because you wanted to.

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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2008, 08:31 AM
 
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78-80% of what I use to inflate my tires is Nitrogen. I find this a cheap and reliable mixture.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2008, 08:54 AM
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When I was a mechanic, we tried it on a race cars we prepared. Hm. Maybe two. The idea is to reduce unsprung weight as much as possible, and the second idea is that pure nitrogen is more stable than mixed compressed air. The results were indeed mixed. The driver said he could feel only a little difference, and even then he admitted it might have been his imagination. We saw slightly better wear patterns on the slicks, but again, that might have been the driver doing a better job. Be mindful that nitrogen works best on race tires which are engineered to be as light as possible. Street tires for any vehicle are significantly more robust and thus heavy in comparison. Reduction in unsprung weight is better achieved with attention to fasteners, brake components, and wheels. All of these can lead to decreased reliability, though.

Nitrogen in tires is the modern equivalent of fuel injection additives that used to fill parts shop shelves. Theory says yes, real-world application says no difference. If it makes you feel better about your tires, do it. I would keep my money and buy more gas for riding.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2008, 08:58 AM
 
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Theoretically if you use pure nitrogen to inflate your tires, the pressure you put in them will stay consistent instead of varying with the temperature. Pure nitrogen will not expand/contract with rising and falling temperatures like regular "atmosphere" does. That supposedly leads to longer tire life due to more consistent pressure in your tires. Since you will keep a pretty good eye on the pressure of your bike tires, it's not worth doing a Nitrogen fill on them.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2008, 09:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CheesyRider View Post
It sounds like you may be using a mixture similar to the one I use. What do you use for the remaining 20-22%? I use oxygen and a little bit of argon and carbon dioxide...
Wow, small world isn't it?
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2008, 09:25 AM
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nitrogen

I have over 6,000 miles on my bike and have never had to put air in my tires. I ran the stock Dunlops for 4,500 miles. I now have Dunlop Roadsmart tires on the bike which are suppose to be a long lasting tire. Now my car, that's a different story. I have Good Year tires on it and have to put air in them all the time.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2008, 05:02 PM Thread Starter
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Fantastic thanks guys.

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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-14-2008, 01:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 08 Versys View Post
Theoretically if you use pure nitrogen to inflate your tires, the pressure you put in them will stay consistent instead of varying with the temperature. Pure nitrogen will not expand/contract with rising and falling temperatures like regular "atmosphere" does.
PV=nRT

I don't think nitrogen is exempt from this law.

There are lots of claims on manufacturer's sites, but most are not really backed up with any real science.

From the NitroFill website:
Quote:
Why Inflate with NitroFill™?
Compressed air is your tire’s worst enemy. Air is about 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, and 1% other. Nitrogen is inert, non combustible and non corrosive. Oxygen, on the other hand, is immensely destructive to rubber and other tire materials. As soon as a tire is manufactured and exposed to air, the effects of “oxidation” begin to deteriorate the rubber. Over time it loses its elasticity and strength, just like an old rubber band you’ve probably found around your home. This same process occurs in tires inflated with air as the oxygen attacks the rubber molecules, working from the inside out, until the oxygen, and its destructive properties, permeates the tire structure and ultimately the tread.
Maybe be significnat for your car tires. My bike tires wear long before you see any deterioration due to oxidation.

Quote:
Low tire pressure is generally due to one of the following three conditions:

1. A leak. Most tire leaks are the result of a hole or puncture, faulty valve, or a porous or corroded wheel.
2. Permeation. Permeation is the normal process by which the air in a tire bleeds through the tire’s body or carcass. It is typical for an "air" filled tire to lose 1-2 psi of pressure every month through normal permeation whereas it can take several months for a NitroFilled tire to lose a single pound of pressure.
3. Temperature Change. All gases expand and contract with temperature. If you live in an area that experiences dramatic temperature changes, you will have to adjust your tire pressure accordingly. Typically you will only have to adjust your tire pressure "up", adding pressure as ambient temperatures decrease. Count on losing about 2% of your total tire pressure for every 10 degrees in temperature reduction.
See ideal gas law above.


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post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-14-2008, 02:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 08 Versys View Post
78-80% of what I use to inflate my tires is Nitrogen. I find this a cheap and reliable mixture.
Ambient air already contains 78% nitrogen. That is cheap and reliable. lol

Compressed air contains moisture and oxygen, which can cause oxidation, corrosion, leakage, and accelerated wear in tires. Such air also attacks the wheel, forming aluminum hydroxide that produces an extremely fine dust. Oxygen catalyzed by water works its way into and through the tire cord body, causing heat, expansion, and loss of strength and elasticity. Oxidative ageing is accelerated when heated and affects only the rubber near the surface, as essentially all the oxygen is consumed by reaction with rubber before it can diffuse into the bulk, and a resinous oxidized layer is formed. CO2, CO and hydrocarbon gases are produced in the reaction.
Nitrogen disperses heat quicker than regular compressed air, and leaks about 30 to 40 percent slower, so proper inflation pressure is better maintained, causing the tire to run approximately 20% cooler than tires inflated with air. Nitrogen does expand when heated by a bit more than half the rate of oxygen, but it does so much more proportionally.

I know nitrogen is offered here at a cost, but I've never tried it.
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Last edited by invader; 07-14-2008 at 04:55 AM.
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