Changed my own tires... - Kawasaki Versys Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-09-2010, 06:48 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Changed my own tires...

My wife got me the Cycle Hill changer for Christmas along with the scratch proof bead breaker so after building a platform for it and making a set up for my balancer with work table in the basement I decided to try it today. I removed my front rim and walked right down to the basement, cold tire and all.

Bead broke right off, not trouble, hardly even worked for it and I used a trick I read on Webbikeworld to put a bungee cord on the breaker to lift it back up for you as you rotate the tire, worked perfectly.

I then sprayed the bead, took the dismount bar, insert, twist and rotate, pop off it came, insert, twist and rotate and pop the tire is off. 15 or 20 min start to finish.

I am waiting on the replacement tire to install, but wow, what a freaking cake walk so far, can't believe I waited so long and spent so much on tires from stealers.

Anyone who uses a set or more of tires a year is crazy not to get this changer, it will pay for itself in two changes I am guessing, three if you add the balancer and a few extra supplies.

I am on my third set of tires on the Versys, I am running z6's which I can get for about $250 a set delivered, I paid a local ind shop just over $200 for a rear alone, and that is with me removing the rim myself. That means I am saving about $100 to $150 a set of tires, not to mention the time to drive to the dealer drop the rims off, drive back and pick them up.
marc11 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 04:25 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Just checked the website - seems I bought what looks similar here in the Uk. Have 8 wheels in total and got fed up breaking beads with a caprenter vice and sweating like a pig.

Likewise though need to block the wheel/disc to break bead. Doesnt come with the no-mar type breaker bar which looks a good idea, which is something I'm going to fab up. but tested without bolting down and still changed a 190 okay. stores well and does car tires too.

Just get it nearer the TV, be all set!

Cost here about £179/$268.

4731 is offline  
post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 05:48 AM
Member
 
CanadianFZ6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Kitchener, Ontario
Posts: 175
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Getting it off is easy... I did mine with simple hand tools... Mounting was a little harder.... but the hardest part was "seating" the new bead.... I tried and tried, but couldn't get enough air in the tire to seat it. I ended up taking it to the shop to have them fill it. You will need a good air compressor to seat the new tires...

'14 Versys 650 (Green)
'14Honda CB500x
CanadianFZ6 is offline  
 
post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 06:58 AM
Member
 
Element's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Springfield, MO
Posts: 2,241
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadianFZ6 View Post
Getting it off is easy... I did mine with simple hand tools... Mounting was a little harder.... but the hardest part was "seating" the new bead.... I tried and tried, but couldn't get enough air in the tire to seat it. I ended up taking it to the shop to have them fill it. You will need a good air compressor to seat the new tires...
Might be worth trying this product since you guys have the ability and tools to change tires. I used a similar product called No Tubes on my mountain bike and it works. You need an air compressor to fill the tire quickly, but once sealed, you can count on no flats for months. Not sure how long the product listed here lasts. Maybe someone has tried it?

http://www.ride-on.com/prod_mot.asp

My Album:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Element is offline  
post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 07:07 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
I have a 33 gallon 5 or so HP air compressor I use for air tools and stuff, it will have no problem seating the beads on the tires. I think having the right "extra" tools makes this idea easier, like an air compressor, balancer, etc, all of which I already owned prior to getting the tire changer.
marc11 is offline  
post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 07:13 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 133bhp View Post
Just checked the website - seems I bought what looks similar here in the Uk. Have 8 wheels in total and got fed up breaking beads with a caprenter vice and sweating like a pig.

Likewise though need to block the wheel/disc to break bead. Doesnt come with the no-mar type breaker bar which looks a good idea, which is something I'm going to fab up. but tested without bolting down and still changed a 190 okay. stores well and does car tires too.

Just get it nearer the TV, be all set!

Cost here about £179/$268.


Yours looks similar to the one a company here called Harbor Freight sells. It'll do the job, but the biggest thing with the Cycle Hill version is the scratch proof bead breaker, scratch proof rim clamps and scratch proof mount/dismount tools. All of these have a thick replaceable delrin (spelling, that stuff used for frame sliders, like plastic, but different) coating. You can't gouge your rims with those tools, which is a huge piece of mind for me.

For breaking the bead my tire wasn't clamped down, the machine is mounted to a platform I built because I didn't want to drill holes in my concrete basement floor.

See pics attached:



marc11 is offline  
post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 09:35 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by marc11 View Post
Yours looks similar to the one a company here called Harbor Freight sells. It'll do the job, but the biggest thing with the Cycle Hill version is the scratch proof bead breaker, scratch proof rim clamps and scratch proof mount/dismount tools. All of these have a thick replaceable delrin (spelling, that stuff used for frame sliders, like plastic, but different) coating. You can't gouge your rims with those tools, which is a huge piece of mind for me.

For breaking the bead my tire wasn't clamped down, the machine is mounted to a platform I built because I didn't want to drill holes in my concrete basement floor.

See pics attached:

]
Yes, similar, my guess there's a few variations on a theme out there? Only one I've seen in the UK though so far for decent money

But coated clamps so doesnt scratch rims. The breaker bar is weakest point, although the flat obviates the need for a side handle to stop twisting, but clears the riim if careful (i.e use a rim saver to start off) I'd buy the no mar breaker but its expensive for what it is/shipping, so will copy it, maybe with small rollers and a the flat section?

regards popping tyre on? Before air compressor I've used a bicycle stand pump many times. If difficult?, getting your girlfrined to sit on tyre whilst pumping will help form a seal.
4731 is offline  
post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 10:31 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Reading, Pa
Posts: 690
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
I have a harbor freight tire changer .I some ideas from this guys video on how to change tires (prevent scratches) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_34k...eature=related

to balance the tire I was thinking about switching to.
http://www.innovativebalancing.com/motorcycle.htm
turn8a is offline  
post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 11:03 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Wilmington, Illinois
Posts: 59
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
You can try using a ratcheting tie down strap to hold pressure on the tire while inflating it to seat the bead. It works for me. I have used large straps to even help get tires back on the wheels of construction equipment on site. The small ones work great for motorcycles and lawn tractors.
Steve
sstack is offline  
post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 01:12 PM
Super Moderator
 
fasteddiecopeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kelowna, BC - summer; Florence, AZ - winter
Posts: 17,319
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by turn8a View Post
to balance the tire I was thinking about switching to.
http://www.innovativebalancing.com/motorcycle.htm
Try "Dyna Beads". I use them in my KLR's tubes, and put them in when I changed tires on the "V", and they work GREAT!

Ed
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


'08 V AZ, '15 V650LT BC
Ride to D2D 2013, June '13

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Ride to D2D 2015, June '15

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Ride to D2D 2016, June '16

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
fasteddiecopeman is offline  
post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 02:27 PM
Member
 
bscott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: De Soto, KS.
Posts: 273
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadianFZ6 View Post
Mounting was a little harder.... but the hardest part was "seating" the new bead.... I tried and tried, but couldn't get enough air in the tire to seat it. I ended up taking it to the shop to have them fill it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstack View Post
You can try using a ratcheting tie down strap to hold pressure on the tire while inflating it to seat the bead.
Or you can use this method. It looks to work well using a bit of starting fluid or butane.
It looks dangerous, but I've seen shops use this method as well.
Probably not OSHA approved...

No Video

or

No Video

Kansas - Eleven curves in three hundred eighteen miles...

2008 Versys, SOLD!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

2002 BMW R1150RT Lovin it!!!


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Last edited by bscott; 01-10-2010 at 05:13 PM. Reason: speling
bscott is offline  
post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 02:33 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 687
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by marc11 View Post
My wife got me the Cycle Hill changer for Christmas.
Marc, you married the right girl.
Mt. Versuvius is offline  
post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 08:55 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Reading, Pa
Posts: 690
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by fasteddiecopeman View Post
Try "Dyna Beads". I use them in my KLR's tubes, and put them in when I changed tires on the "V", and they work GREAT!
thanks for the info.
turn8a is offline  
post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 10:42 PM
Member
 
bigaussie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Victoria, BC
Posts: 842
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by bscott View Post
Or you can use this method. It looks to work well using a bit of starting fluid or butane.
It looks dangerous, but I've seen shops use this method as well.
Probably not OSHA approved...
I have seen this done for 4x4 tyres (they were in Australia so it is spelt correctly. Down Under "TIRE" is a verb meaning you are getting worn out or tired, not a noun being a bit of rubber).

Although I have had Miss Jaffa (Burnt Orange 2007 Versys) for a while, I still have a lot to learn.


"The happiest people donít have the best of everything, they just make the best of everything."
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bigaussie is offline  
post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-11-2010, 07:13 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mt. Versuvius View Post
Marc, you married the right girl.
Ha you have no idea! For my birthday that just past, her and my son got me an all aluminum ATV/Motorcycle jack! Thing is just 42 pounds! I already had one, but it was 10 years old, all steel, weighed a TON and was getting worn out, I didn't even ask for it, they just decided I needed it!

Oh and for the Dyna beads I know a lot of people like them, but to be honest, if you change your own tires do you really want that mess all over the place? I dunno, but static balancing is fast, easy and cheap. They even sell wheel weights in different colors if you don't like the look of weights on your rim. I can balance my wheels in about 10 min, I do it on all my bikes including mine and my sons dirt bike, the balancer with a spoke and stick on weights was less than $100, with enough weights to last years.
marc11 is offline  
post #16 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-11-2010, 12:47 PM
Member
 
E-nigma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Send a message via AIM to E-nigma
Quote:
Originally Posted by Element View Post
Might be worth trying this product since you guys have the ability and tools to change tires. I used a similar product called No Tubes on my mountain bike and it works. You need an air compressor to fill the tire quickly, but once sealed, you can count on no flats for months. Not sure how long the product listed here lasts. Maybe someone has tried it?

http://www.ride-on.com/prod_mot.asp
These products will also make a sticky mess inside your tire and on the inner rim surface. No Thanks!
E-nigma is offline  
post #17 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-11-2010, 01:27 PM
Member
 
LessPeople_MoreRobots's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Sarasota, FL
Posts: 53
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
+1 on getting your own tire changer. I bought one earlier this year just because I'm starting to go through them quick enough, and we've got enough bikes to justify it. Even if nothing else, its awesome for convenience because you can just buy tires cheap online and have them shipped straight to your house. No taking my wheels in the car to a shop, etc.

It costs a few bucks more, but you should check out the No-Mar tire changer too. All the contact points are made of this tough-as-nails type of plastic, and if you actuall wear the plastic pieces out, they'll send you new ones for life. I went with the No-Mar so I could try not to scratch the expensive rims on my Duc, and I change tires for my other friends with expensive wheels too.

I bought the 'classic' and it works great, but they make some even heavier-duty models too.

Here's a video of a woman using it: http://www.nomartirechanger.com/videos/27

Here's mine:

Current: 2008 Ducati 1098, 2009 Kawasaki Versys, 2009 Triumph Street Triple, 2006 Mazda MX-5

Previous: 04 GSXR600, 03 CBR600RR, 00 R6, 08 Ninja 250R, 05 Ninja 250R

Last edited by LessPeople_MoreRobots; 01-11-2010 at 01:30 PM.
LessPeople_MoreRobots is offline  
post #18 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-11-2010, 01:31 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
The Cycle Hill one is made by No Mar. It uses the same scratch proof bead breaker, rim clamps, extra hand clamps and mount/dismount bar. It is of a lower price to compete with Harbor Freight and a few other cheap units. The No Mar is NICER with a better bead breaker set up, but the general purpose is the same.
marc11 is offline  
post #19 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-12-2010, 06:12 AM
Member
 
LessPeople_MoreRobots's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Sarasota, FL
Posts: 53
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Ah you're right. I didn't realize there was a setup like that. I was thinking Harbor Freight.

Just noticed thats the same prybar and everything I've got. Dang, I probably could have saved a few dollars. Oh well.

Current: 2008 Ducati 1098, 2009 Kawasaki Versys, 2009 Triumph Street Triple, 2006 Mazda MX-5

Previous: 04 GSXR600, 03 CBR600RR, 00 R6, 08 Ninja 250R, 05 Ninja 250R

Last edited by LessPeople_MoreRobots; 01-12-2010 at 06:15 AM.
LessPeople_MoreRobots is offline  
post #20 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-12-2010, 07:31 PM
Member
 
cuff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Chilliwack BC
Posts: 575
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
I change mine at home as well. Love all the ideas around here but I'm super cheap (and love garage time ) so I found a zero $ option.

Bead braker is a guitar mold I had from obviously making a guitar. Old rim was free from the wrecker and the balancing bearings were from some roller blades I used once.

All worked great with no wobble after mounting or air leakage.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DSC01604.JPG (124.1 KB, 167 views)
File Type: jpg DSC01606.JPG (145.4 KB, 169 views)
File Type: jpg DSC01608.JPG (151.2 KB, 195 views)
File Type: jpg DSC01616.JPG (103.1 KB, 166 views)
File Type: jpg DSC01621.JPG (143.8 KB, 362 views)

Falling down is your bodies way of saying you just screwed up.

IBA# 38547
cuff is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Kawasaki Versys Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome