Changing tires - Kawasaki Versys Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 08:16 AM Thread Starter
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Changing tires

I finished changing my stockers with a set of Pirelli Diablo
Stradas. I used a tire changing stand/balancer from Redline engineering.
As for the tire swapping... it was all generally easy. However, breaking the bead was a bitch. I initially tried the 2x4 method- where you lever a 2x4 under my trucks frame... I intially snapped the piece of wood I was levering with... Needless to say, I got the tires swapped and the rear tire was mounted in the wrong direction. Managed to break the bead thid time using a 2x6 as a lever. Even before they were scrubbed in- the Stradas are sweet tires.


Last Friday I was looking for a motion pro bead breaker, and the owner of a local bike shop told me if I wanted to buy tires off the internet... the internet can install them. I thought it was funny. He said he normally charged $50 per tire to make the swap. Anyone in ME, NH, or MA that wants to change tires let me know.

mb
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 10:50 AM
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I'd love a "how to" with pics. Did you use normal tire irons for the change? Any rim scuffs? I change my dual sport tires, but they are generally easy and you can break the bead with your hands or foot. I haven't attempted street bike tires. I already have a blancer, just wondering what is really needed to change street tires.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 11:13 AM
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The $75.00 set up from Harbour Frieght has a bead breaker and if you take your time, no marks on rims. I have changed a hundred or so with no problems. Balance tires with Ride-On. I change them for $25.00 off the bike and make enough to pay for all the maintaince on my bikes plus beer money.

81 Honda CB750F with Jupiter sidecar, 82 Honda CB750F, 86 Yamaha Radian, 87 BMW K100RS, 2002 Honda XR 200R, 2007 Suzuki Bandit 1250, 2009 Green Versys, 2010 Kawasaki Vukcan 900 Custom
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 12:30 PM Thread Starter
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tire change

I actually have an assortment of 5 tire irons, and I purchased a tire change kit from Redline Engineering. If I had to do it again, I would not have bought the balancer or weights... I would have used Ride-On or Dyna beads instead. As for Ride-On, they are currently have none of the motorcycle product in stock. My rims got slightly scuffed in a couple spots, I'm not too concerned. As for pictures... Check out the Sticky: DIY - Front & Rear Wheel Removal How-To with Pics. Very clear with pictures. Definitely the hardest part was breaking the bead. As an FYI- The tires needed very little weight to balance.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 01:37 PM
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I know how to remove my rims from the bike, I have a garage full of bikes and do all my own maintenance...but it is the removing the tire from the rim without scratching the hell out of it that I have avoided for the last 25 riding years.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 06:59 PM
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I just break the bead by squeezing the tire near the rim in a large table vise. One side pops off, then I lean the rim on a block of wood in the vise to release the other bead. While the new tires are pre-heating to 200 degrees in the sauna (or sitting in the sun), I remove the old tires with tire levers, clean the rim with WD-40, and install the new tires dry. I then balance them by hand by rotating the greased axle in the wheel a bit back and forth while the heavy spot settles down, and find the proper weight by first sticking it to the opposing side with some tape.

Last edited by invader; 09-11-2009 at 04:49 PM.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 08:44 PM
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I invested in a Nomar tire changer. It wasn't cheap but with three bikes it may pay for itself in ten years and I can score some beers from my riding buddies for doing theirs. Just the satisfaction of doing it myself and knowing it's done right is worth something also.
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-17-2011, 07:10 AM
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I've been busting my arse changing tires this weekend. I finally found a video on YouTube that has been very helpful. The guy in this video uses 3 rim protectors and shows the entire process of removing old tire / adding new tire / balancing. Doesn't look like he did any damage to the rims either.

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-17-2011, 08:47 AM
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easy...



static balancers work great...



This ain't so easy, but I was on a couple of rides last year where people's
valve stems gave out (OEM Valkyrie valve stems are a sin), so I made
sure I had the technology in my saddlebags to do something about it
if it happens again... as the other poster said, a clamp or a vise often only
breaks the bead on one side...



-Mike
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-17-2011, 05:32 PM
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It is hard to make the bead-popper do right when you're sitting on the
side of the road with the wheel on the bike trying to put in a new
valve stem... Lady Draco had one this day... a clamp (Joe used two 6 inch
clamps, I put one 8 inch clamp in my saddlebag) did the trick.



Speaking of road-side repairs... we stopped on this day next to a Sears
tire place... they let us stretch the air hose out to where we were, and
that's how we got the tire back on the bead. The Aerostitch catalog
has a engine driven tire pump that hooks to one of your cylinders
at the spark plug hole that I hear can get a tire back on the bead...
don't know first hand... you Versys guys probably aren't pumping out
much horsepower on one cylinder...

-Mike
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post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-17-2011, 07:47 PM
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sorry to hear LD had some problems with the trike, and although the thread context is the R/R of tires in a DIY environment, i'm thinking you could have broken the bead with the tire on the bike using a bead popper.

The bead-popper came from the plush well-lit trunk on LDs trike, but
we were working on the blue and white Valkyrie in the picture... if you
think you coulda got that tire off the bead, while the wheel was on
the bike, I wish we coulda pulled you out of her trunk too... Valkyries have
150 fronts, so that's probably about like a Versys rear...


i don't favor inflators that thread into a spark plug opening. i can think of a bunch of reasons i don't want to do that.

They're probably all good reasons, too. But when you want your tire
back on the bead, and you're hundreds of miles from home, a lighter
and some aerosol might start looking good...

I put a lawn tractor tire back on the bead by tightening a tie-down strap
around its circumference... the instant it started holding air the strap
was all of a sudden scary tight... I guess the best thing is to break down
near the Sears tire place...

-Mike
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