Need help quick please. - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-30-2009, 09:04 PM Thread Starter
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Need help quick please.

So I'm taking my rear wheel in tomorrow to get the flat tire replaced with one which is less so.

Im in the process of taking off the rear wheel and I can't get the axle nut loose. I'm using the PDF service manual and it says remove:
Cotter Pin
Axle Nut
Washer
Axle (from right side)

I've removed the cotter pin and the brake caliper and hugger are off.

I just can't get that axle to budge. I started with the tools in the bag under the seat.
Theyre a bit mangled now.
Then I moved up to one of those tools on the LH side with a hammer-handle wedged under it to keep it from turning, and a big crescent wrench on the other side.
The crescent slipped off on the first go so I gave that up before ruining end of the axle.

So, now I have a great big breaker bar from harbor freight and a 22mm and 24mm socket. I think im gonna leave the 24mm LH side with the stock tool wedged against a hammer and break loose the end of the axle.

Before I bring out the big torque, am I doing something wrong?

I just dont feel like it should be this hard to turn since it says 80ft/lb in the manual.
I don't want to break something but I need that wheel off 2nite!
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-30-2009, 09:08 PM
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You're trying to turn the nut, right?



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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-30-2009, 09:11 PM Thread Starter
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Well I started out turning the nut, then the axle turned on the other side.
So now im holding the nut in place and trying to turn the axle on the other side.
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-30-2009, 09:21 PM Thread Starter
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Ah well, here goes nothing.
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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-30-2009, 09:25 PM
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dude, I took mine off the other day for the first time. The damn thing was on there tight. You have to use some major torque to get it off.

try turning the nut. Get your wife to try and old the axle on the other side. You'll get it, you just have to use some muscle. I can't believe they put the darn thing on so tight.
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-30-2009, 09:36 PM
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The tools in a toolkit are usually stamped junk. A crescent wrench is also usually bad for high torque applications. Use a socket and breaker bar (not a ratchet) and/or the correct size quality box end wrench on each side and push hard on one while pulling hard on the other. I prefer using the wrenches as they're less likely to twist/slip off.
(I assume you are attempting to turn them in the correct direction)
If you have tools that fit snug, some kroil or liquid wrench on the threads might help.
If you have reached a point of high frustration I recommend a beer or two, but no more than three.

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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-30-2009, 09:50 PM Thread Starter
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Ok, the breaker bar did the trick.
I'm pretty sure that wasn't just 80 ft/lb.

I was just worried that I was missing something and I was going to screw up.

Getting the axle out was a pain in the ass too. Lots of wiggling the wheel and tugging the axle.
I hope it's easier to get in (but im not optimistic).

The wheel is off and I'll be getting my D208 tomorrow (not my first choice but there isn't much selection in town and I need to be in business by Friday).

PS thanks everybody!
I'll try and remember to take a pic of my rear wheel removal setup in the morning, it's pretty humorous.
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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-30-2009, 09:59 PM
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when putting the axle in put a thin layer of grease on it. Very thin. Grease where the silver washers sit in the hub of the tire. Put a good coat of grease on those. It also helps them stick in place when putting the tire back on.
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-30-2009, 10:48 PM
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Normal break out torque for a dry fastener that was torqued 80 lb/ft would be well in excess of 100 lb/ft. Standing behind the bike up on a race stand, I hold the axle with a 1/2" drive ratchet and my right foot while pulling up on a 18" breaker bar and socket on the nut. It is also helpful to make up some blocks and shims to hold the tire at the right height for the axle to line up. Label the blocks with a felt point marker so you can find them again :-) Because you will need them many more times :-)

Clean the grease out of the seals and re-grease them just prior to putting the spacers back in. Don't get excessive, especially on the brake side. A light coat of grease on the axle is good also. A short piece of 3/4" wood dowel cut to the length of the wheel, sprocket carrier and both spacers with the ends very slightly tapered but still square on the ends will make remounting the wheel easier. You can also drive out the axle with the same dowel the next time you remove it. Another short piece of the same dowel will finish driving the taper dowel even with the end of the spacers and the wheel will come out with both spacers and sprocket carrier and nothing falls in the dirt :-) In case you didn't note it, the black spacer goes on the sprocket side (left) of the wheel.

You probably saved yourself $25~30 by carrying in the wheel and tire in. Feels good :-)
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-30-2009, 11:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob in FL View Post
Normal break out torque for a dry fastener that was torqued 80 lb/ft would be well in excess of 100 lb/ft. Standing behind the bike up on a race stand, I hold the axle with a 1/2" drive ratchet and my right foot while pulling up on a 18" breaker bar and socket on the nut. It is also helpful to make up some blocks and shims to hold the tire at the right height for the axle to line up. Label the blocks with a felt point marker so you can find them again :-) Because you will need them many more times :-)

Clean the grease out of the seals and re-grease them just prior to putting the spacers back in. Don't get excessive, especially on the brake side. A light coat of grease on the axle is good also. A short piece of 3/4" wood dowel cut to the length of the wheel, sprocket carrier and both spacers with the ends very slightly tapered but still square on the ends will make remounting the wheel easier. You can also drive out the axle with the same dowel the next time you remove it. Another short piece of the same dowel will finish driving the taper dowel even with the end of the spacers and the wheel will come out with both spacers and sprocket carrier and nothing falls in the dirt :-) In case you didn't note it, the black spacer goes on the sprocket side (left) of the wheel.

You probably saved yourself $25~30 by carrying in the wheel and tire in. Feels good :-)
That was a very good reply. You should post more often.

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post #11 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-30-2009, 11:40 PM
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Also, when breaking loose the axle bolt: Some of those of us with not-so-new backs and spare-tire guts would do well to SIT ON OUR BUTTS and use opposing forces with our arms and a couple of breaker bars. Pulling upward on a breaker bar while bent over the back of the bike is the equivalent of "Lifting with your back, not your legs". I've done both and can say from experience two weeks of NOT riding the V was almost as painful as having to find a way to levitate because I couldn't sit,stand,walk or lay after trying the pull-up method.

On a side note, has anybody noticed a squishy rear brake for the first few pumps after loosening the axle nut and adjusting the chain ? I never get the normal problems.
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post #12 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-01-2009, 01:31 AM
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cetzel,

cetzel,

Sorry about the back.

I don't do well on knees or butt on concrete. If you don't do well on you butt, you might try standing on the right side of the bike and putting your chest on the pillion. Then you can pull up using only your arms.

I had the rear wheel off about a week ago to change the sprocket and have not noticed any difference in braking. Any possibility of disturbing the banjo nut on the caliper?
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post #13 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-01-2009, 02:07 AM
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Hi Cetzel,

Maybe a bit squishy because the brake oil is been pushed back to the pump when you have to remove the tire brake pads from the wheel brake discs.
Pumping it a few times after you have the tire back on will prime the brake oil back.
Good to bleed the brake oil a bit to purge any air in the system and to be sure it's primed with oil.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvyztDFHhaY

Good Luck.

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post #14 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-01-2009, 10:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cetzel View Post
On a side note, has anybody noticed a squishy rear brake for the first few pumps after loosening the axle nut and adjusting the chain ? I never get the normal problems.
I get that all the time, whenever I change pads or remove the rotor for any reason. (car or bike) One or two pumps seats the pads back on the rotors.

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post #15 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-01-2009, 10:29 AM
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When replacing the rear wheel - and threading the axel back through: I was supprise
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post #16 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-01-2009, 10:33 AM
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When replacing the rear wheel - and threading the axel back through: I was supprise
When replacing the rear wheel - and threading the axel back through: I was suprised at how heavy the wheel was. I am used to working on smaller bikes. I ended up suspending the wheel in the air by looping a bungee cord through the "spokes" and up and over the seat. That made the wheel about 90% "lighter". The i used some wood scraps to shim and wedge up the wheel from the bottom. And ...Presto! The axel slipped right in.
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post #17 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-01-2009, 03:29 PM
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After putting the bike up on the rear standby push as many flat blocks and shims (that are about 5" X 9") under the rear tire as you can easily push by hand. Then loosen the axle. You can then drive the axle out with a short dowel. When you put the wheel and tire back, turn the chain adjusters in a couple of turns. Add a 1/4" shim to the stack under the rear wheel. Put the wheel, sprocket carrier, caliper, chain and spacers back in place. Put the washer and the adjusting block on the axle. You can look at the rub marks on the blocks and tell which side and which way they were installed originally. I like to put them back the same so I don't get any new rub marks :-) Now since the swing arm is hanging down a a good angle, you can look through the axle slots in the SA and roll the tire backwards and forwards until the axle slot height lines up with the spacers and bearings. Look at the right side and line the caliper up with the bearings, spacer and swing arm slot. Start the axle through the caliper and into the first right (silver) spacer. Now if you used a short tapered dowel to hold the spacers and sprocket carrier in place you can push the short dowel out with the axle. If everything is lined up real good, you can use your hand. If not a small soft faced mallet or a 2 X 4 block in hand is plenty. Pull the blocks and shims out. Put the left adjuster block, washer and nut on. Adjust chain and torque nut. I don't usually put the cotter key in until I have test ridden the bike and and made any track adjustments necessary.

Just in case you think you might like to replace the rear wheel without moving the adjusters: It's not impossible but you will bust your butt doing it! Time to R&R rear wheel = <30min. and not even break a sweat, if you have your tools, blocks & shims, and a center stand or race stand.
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post #18 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-01-2009, 04:25 PM
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Plug for Southwest Moto Tires...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shatrat View Post
SNIP
The wheel is off and I'll be getting my D208 tomorrow (not my first choice but there isn't much selection in town and I need to be in business by Friday).
SNIP
Just an FYI for future reference, but I've never had to wait past the second day after ordering to receive a tire from swmototires.com. It's been awhile since the last one, but hopefully they're still that good. Prices tended to be among the cheapest as well.
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post #19 of 24 (permalink) Old 07-01-2009, 09:48 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the heads up.

My friend who was coming from the TN-WV border to go riding canceled because he wanted to work on building his new house like a chump.
If I had known that I would have been less impatient and gone with the Dunlop Roadsmart Sport Touring tires that a local dealer was offering me for $141, although they would have had to order them.

Still, my bike has over 8000 miles on it and the tires seemed to be the original Dunlop 221s. They were squared off but plenty of rubber left.

I imagine I'll get quite a few miles from these 208s.

I'm sorry I forgot to take a picture before I put the wheel back on. I had the rear of the bike suspended from a dogwood tree in my front yard by 2 tie-downs.
Harbor freight didnt have any swingarm stands in stock.
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post #20 of 24 (permalink) Old 09-16-2013, 11:44 AM
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Man, glad to see it's not just me. I just put an extension on the left 27mm axle wrench supplied and bent it. That nut is on there. Left me scratching my head thinking lefty loosy, right.
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