Bead Breaker - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2013, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
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Bead Breaker

I've been posting wheel removal/tire changing threads recently and I would like to know from those who have done this DIYer what they used to break the tire bead. I've been looking at the Stop & Go, the Black widow (which also goes by another brand). I've seen videos on jakewilson.com where they used the stop & go, as well as the black widow from discountramps.com.

I also saw videos of people using 2x4s, which looked like it does the job, but you risk damage to your rim and rotor.

I am determined to learn and do this rather than bring it to the dealer, ready to buy the needed tools, supplies, and tires to save major $$. They wanted over $400 for the tires and install. Even if I spend the same amount now, the next time I change my tires, which will most likely be next fall, I'll have the tools, supplies and knowledge to do it AGAIN... all I need to buy are the tires.

I would greatly appreciate any feedback + or - on the bead breaker that you used. Thanks!
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post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2013, 03:13 PM
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My uncle has one of these, and it works pretty well. Might be a little more than you are looking for though.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/American-Mad...p2054897.l4276
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post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2013, 03:22 PM
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Bought a 40-50 buck bead breaker base thru amazon & the No-Mar tire changing bar right from them. Spent at least an hour fooling with each wheel before buying the tools, now it's a matter of minutes to remove & replace a tire. The tires & tools delivered to my house for less than my dealer wanted for the back tire.
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post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2013, 03:27 PM
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My go-to tire guy has a cheapo Harbor Freight unit that does the job.
http://www.harborfreight.com/portabl...ger-69686.html
http://www.harborfreight.com/motorcy...ent-60810.html

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post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2013, 04:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ESE_VERSYS2013 View Post
I would greatly appreciate any feedback + or - on the bead breaker that you used. Thanks!
Here's a link to what I use (one each in Canada and the US...):

http://www.whitehorsegear.com/tire-bead-breaker

Works well.

Ed
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post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2013, 08:58 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genehil View Post
My go-to tire guy has a cheapo Harbor Freight unit that does the job.
http://www.harborfreight.com/portabl...ger-69686.html
http://www.harborfreight.com/motorcy...ent-60810.html
Looking at the pictures and descriptions, I think just the bottom part will do the job for me. I will probably get the attachment later, depending on how hard or easy the process is for me. Does your tire guy have both? Thanks again.
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post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2013, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by ESE_VERSYS2013 View Post
Looking at the pictures and descriptions, I think just the bottom part will do the job for me. I will probably get the attachment later, depending on how hard or easy the process is for me. Does your tire guy have both? Thanks again.
He has both... Those three long arms are adjustable to hold the wheel rim firmly and makes it easier to pry the tire beads off of and on to the wheel.

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post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2013, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ESE_VERSYS2013 View Post
I've been posting wheel removal/tire changing threads recently and I would like to know from those who have done this DIYer what they used to break the tire bead. I've been looking at the Stop & Go, the Black widow (which also goes by another brand). I've seen videos on jakewilson.com where they used the stop & go, as well as the black widow from discountramps.com.

I also saw videos of people using 2x4s, which looked like it does the job, but you risk damage to your rim and rotor.

I am determined to learn and do this rather than bring it to the dealer, ready to buy the needed tools, supplies, and tires to save major $$. They wanted over $400 for the tires and install. Even if I spend the same amount now, the next time I change my tires, which will most likely be next fall, I'll have the tools, supplies and knowledge to do it AGAIN... all I need to buy are the tires.

I would greatly appreciate any feedback + or - on the bead breaker that you used. Thanks!
Motion Pro has a plastic chisel which is cheap and sort of works but would not be something I would recommend. From the ones I have seen online the Stop and Go looks like one of the best. My concern with the Black Window design is it looks like it would take a lot of space to store when not in use.

Once you get the hang of doing your own tires I think you will wonder why you ever paid dealers big money to do this. Dyna beads work really well. Put them in the tire when you have got the bottom bead on, under the top bead, rather than through the valve stem as it is a lot easier with tubeless tires this way.
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post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2013, 04:19 PM
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Originally Posted by genehil View Post
He has both... Those three long arms are adjustable to hold the wheel rim firmly and makes it easier to pry the tire beads off of and on to the wheel.
If I am only changing motorcycle tires, would I need both?
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post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2013, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by trialsguy View Post
If I am only changing motorcycle tires, would I need both?
No first-hand experience. It all belongs to a riding buddy who does my tires as needed.
I help out when he's helping me out with new tires... so I do know he uses the bottom part to break the bead and then uses the top part to adapt the rig to motorcycle tires for muscling the old tire off and the new tire onto the rim.

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Last edited by genehil; 09-27-2013 at 04:48 PM.
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post #11 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2013, 05:05 PM
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Do mine at home as well but went completely DIY. Three tire irons and the below setup. Recently added a $30 tire balancer to the mix. Once you get the hang of it takes an hour of your time including removal and re-install of wheels.

http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums...9&postcount=20

Falling down is your bodies way of saying you just screwed up.

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post #12 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2013, 08:21 PM
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I started out with a DIY setup like Cuff's. Using a block of wood to press against the tire to break the bead, I never had any issues with scratching anything, like you asked about. Wood doesn't scratch the rim.

I later bought the Harbor Freight setup also linked above. The big advantage for me with the HF tool was the bead breaker. It works much better than my homemade bead breaker did. My homemade clamping setup, however, was just about as good as the HF.

No-Mar is the real tool for the job, but you have to figure if you'll use it enough to make it worthwhile.

Whitehorse Press is going out of business so it's time for a final sale. Signed copies of my book are now $10 with free shipping in the U.S. while they last.
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post #13 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2013, 09:08 PM
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I replaced my tires a couple of weeks ago.

I bought a
http://www.harborfreight.com/bead-breaker-92961.html

And it worked really well.

To put the tires back though despite I had three long tire irons was more difficult than I expected and I had to use a few tie wraps to keep the bead in the center.

To seat the bead of the new tire I had to take the pressure close to 60psi.
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post #14 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2013, 09:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Murquiza View Post
I replaced my tires a couple of weeks ago.

I bought a
http://www.harborfreight.com/bead-breaker-92961.html

And it worked really well.

To put the tires back though despite I had three long tire irons was more difficult than I expected and I had to use a few tie wraps to keep the bead in the center.

To seat the bead of the new tire I had to take the pressure close to 60psi.
Lots of soapy water and a clean rim go along way for bead setting.

Falling down is your bodies way of saying you just screwed up.

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post #15 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-28-2013, 12:06 PM
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A verry large C clamp is slow and cheep but it will work
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post #16 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-30-2013, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by genehil View Post
No first-hand experience. It all belongs to a riding buddy who does my tires as needed.
I help out when he's helping me out with new tires... so I do know he uses the bottom part to break the bead and then uses the top part to adapt the rig to motorcycle tires for muscling the old tire off and the new tire onto the rim.
Could you please explain further?

- It looks like each one of these pieces of equipment has a bead breaker on it. Which piece of equipent works better for breaking the bead on a motorcycle tire?

- Which piece of equipment does he use to remove and replace the motorcycle tire?

- What needs to be adapted? And why?

Thanks!

Dave
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post #17 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-30-2013, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by trialsguy View Post
Could you please explain further?
- It looks like each one of these pieces of equipment has a bead breaker on it. Which piece of equipent works better for breaking the bead on a motorcycle tire?
- Which piece of equipment does he use to remove and replace the motorcycle tire?
- What needs to be adapted? And why?
Thanks!
Dave
Can't answer your questions, Dave... My tire-buddy is not were I can easily access him at the moment and the last tire I did with him was well over a year ago. I don't have any first-hand experience with this HF rig other than lending a hand (mostly standing around watching him)... I just know he uses it and it seems to work pretty well.
There may someone else on this thread that can answer your questions... or there may be a Harbor Freight near enough to you for a nice ride/look-see.
Sorry I wasn't more help.

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post #18 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-30-2013, 12:06 PM
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Check this out:
http://www.bestrestproducts.com/c-98-beadbrakr.aspx

Its geared for adventure riding and side of the road repairs but its what I plan on getting.
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post #19 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-30-2013, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by genehil View Post
Can't answer your questions, Dave... My tire-buddy is not were I can easily access him at the moment and the last tire I did with him was well over a year ago. I don't have any first-hand experience with this HF rig other than lending a hand (mostly standing around watching him)... I just know he uses it and it seems to work pretty well.
There may someone else on this thread that can answer your questions... or there may be a Harbor Freight near enough to you for a nice ride/look-see.
Sorry I wasn't more help.
Thanks Genehill. Yes, there's a Harbor Freight somwhat near my office, so I plan on dropping in there for a look see.

Thanks again.

Dave
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post #20 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-30-2013, 02:10 PM
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Earlier I posted that I use the bead-breakers I got from Whitehorse gear. Works up to a 160/60 tire, and I've discovered that once you get one side of the bead broken, you can use a small piece of lumber to protect your rim when getting the other side broken. Incidentally - the tire/ wheel is resting on some 2x4s screwed together, to keep the rotors "happy".
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bead-breaker.jpg (101.2 KB, 499 views)

Ed
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