Someone with "Brains" to the Courtesy Phone Please - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 09:21 AM Thread Starter
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Someone with "Brains" to the Courtesy Phone Please

OK here's the problem - I have a Torque wrench that measures in "INCH POUNDS", but as you well know all of the Versys measurements are in "FOOT POUNDS" . Considering the cost of a new " foot pound" torque wrench I would like to use what I already have--- sooooo how does a dummy convert inch pounds to foot pounds ---- please keep it simple as I am technically challenged. TIA
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post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 09:26 AM
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To convert inch pounds to foot pounds, divide by 12.

12 inch pounds = 1 foot pound
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post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 09:47 AM
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Since I don't always have the brains I found this website quite useful a few times http://www.onlineconversion.com/torque.htm and it doesn't just do torque.

Moon Dust Gray Versys, with lots of farkles.

Vlast

P.S. I bought my Versys to support my photography hobby.


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post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 09:57 AM
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I like this site as it does a whole bunch of stuff.

http://megaconverter.com/mega2/
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post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 10:04 AM
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The problem is going to be, an inch pound torque wrench is made for lighter torque needs. That's the main reason there is such a thing as an inch pound torque wrench. It most likely won't go high enough for torque settings given in foot pounds.

My toys:
'09 Versys in Cool Lime ~ '06 Harley Roadking
'95 Suzuki DR350S ~ '94 Suzuki DR350S
'09 Kawi STX15F jet ski ~ '07 Kawi STX12F Jetski
'09 Yamaha Superjet ~ '13 Ram 4X4 3500 Cummins
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post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 10:35 AM
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Heres a Ft. Lb torque wrench from Harbor Freight tools that is reasonable.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...Itemnumber=239

$19.99 1/2" drive From 10 to 150 Ft. LBS

'09 Versys -Green

TET'68 Survivor
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post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 11:19 AM
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Hope you can decipher these charts from the Versys service manual.

Not all are in foot/lbs, many are inch/lbs, which because they are smaller and more frail are the critical ones.


Machog

Units of Force:
N 0.1020 = kg
N 0.2248 = lb
kg 9.807 = N
kg 2.205 = lb

Units of Torque:
Nm 0.1020 = kgfm
Nm 0.7376 = ftlb
Nm 8.851 = inlb
kgfm 9.807 = Nm
kgfm 7.233 = ftlb
kgfm 86.80 = inlb




Torque and Locking Agent
Torque
Fastener
Nm kgfm ftlb
Remarks
Turn Signal Light Lens Screws 1.0 0.10 9 inlb
Alternator Cover Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Alternator Lead Holding Plate Bolt 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L
Alternator Rotor Bolt 155 15.8 114 MO
Engine Ground Cable Terminal Bolt 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Front Brake Light Switch Screw 1.2 0.12 11 inlb
Left Switch Housing Screws 3.5 0.36 31 inlb
Right Switch Housing Screws 3.5 0.36 31 inlb
Sidestand Switch Bolt 3.9 0.40 35 inlb L
Starter Motor Cable Terminal Nut 6.0 0.61 53 inlb
Starter Motor Clutch Bolts 34 3.5 25 L
Starter Motor Mounting Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L
Starter Motor Terminal Locknut 11 1.1 97 inlb
Starter Motor Through Bolts 4.9 0.50 43 inlb
Stator Coil Bolts 12 1.2 106 inlb L
Crankshaft Sensor Bolts 6.0 0.61 53 inlb
Neutral Switch 15 1.5 11
Oil Pressure Switch 15 1.5 11 SS
Oxygen Sensor (Europe Models) 44.1 4.50 32.5
Spark Plugs 15 1.5 11
Speed Sensor Bolt 7.8 0.80 69 inlb L
Timing Rotor Bolt 40 4.1 30
Water Temperature Sensor 12 1.2 106 inlb
Fuel Level Sensor Bolts 6.9 0.70 61 inlb L
The table below, relating tightening torque to thread diameter, lists the basic torque for the bolts and
nuts. Use this table for only the bolts and nuts which do not require a specific torque value. All of the
values are for use with dry solvent-cleaned threads.
Basic Torque for General Fasteners
Threads Diameter Torque
(mm) Nm kgfm ftlb
5 3.4 ∼ 4.9 0.35 ∼ 0.50 30 ∼ 43 inlb
6 5.9 ∼ 7.8 0.60 ∼ 0.80 52 ∼ 69 inlb
8 14 ∼ 19 1.4 ∼ 1.9 10.0 ∼ 13.5
10 25 ∼ 34 2.6 ∼ 3.5 19.0 ∼ 25
12 44 ∼ 61 4.5 ∼ 6.2 33 ∼ 45
14 73 ∼ 98 7.4 ∼ 10.0 54 ∼ 72
16 115 ∼ 155 11.5 ∼ 16.0 83 ∼ 115
18 165 ∼ 225 17.0 ∼ 23.0 125 ∼ 165
20 225 ∼ 325 23.0 ∼ 33.0 165 ∼ 240

Torque and Locking Agent
Torque
Fastener
Nm kgfm ftlb
Remarks
Front Brake Reservoir Cap Screws 1.5 0.15 13 inlb
Front Caliper Mounting Bolts 34 3.5 25
Front Master Cylinder Clamp Bolts 8.8 0.90 78 inlb
Bleed Valve 7.8 0.80 69 inlb
Brake Hose Banjo Bolts 25 2.5 18
Brake Pedal Bolt 8.8 0.90 78 inlb
Rear Brake Disc Mounting Bolts 27 2.8 20 L
Rear Caliper Mounting Bolts 25 2.5 18
Rear Master Cylinder Mounting Bolts 25 2.5 18
Rear Master Cylinder Push Rod Locknut 18 1.8 13
Brake Pipe Joint Nuts (KLE650B Models) 18 1.8 13
Suspension
Front Axle Clamp Bolt 20 2.0 15
Front Fork Bottom Allen Bolts 20 2.0 15
Front Fork Clamp Bolts (Lower) 29 3.0 21 AL
Front Fork Clamp Bolts (Upper) 20 2.0 15
Front Fork Top Plugs 35 3.6 26
Piston Rod Nuts 20 2.0 15
Rear Shock Absorber Bolt (Upper) 59 6.0 44
Rear Shock Absorber Nut (Lower) 59 6.0 44
Swingarm Pivot Shaft Nut 108 11.0 80
Steering
Front Fork Clamp Bolts (Lower) 29 3.0 21 AL
Front Fork Clamp Bolts (Upper) 20 2.0 15
Upper Handlebar Holder Bolts 25 2.5 18 S
Lower Handlebar Holder Bolts 25 2.5 18
Left Switch Housing Screws 3.5 0.36 31 inlb
Right Switch Housing Screws 3.5 0.36 31 inlb
Steering Stem Head Bolt 108 11.0 80
Steering Stem Nut 20 2.0 15
Frame
Footpeg Holder Bolts 34 3.5 25 L
Front Footpeg Stay Bolts 25 2.5 18
Rear Footpeg Stay Bolts 25 2.5 18
Sidestand Bolt 44 4.5 32
Sidestand Switch Bolt 3.9 0.40 35 inlb L
Lower Fairing Mounting Bolts 8.8 0.90 78 inlb
Windshield Mounting Bolts 0.40 0.041 3.5 inlb
Tandem Grip Mounting Bolts 25 2.5 18
Electrical System
Tail/Brake Light Mounting Bolts 1.2 0.12 11 inlb
License Plate Light Cover Screws 0.90 0.090 8 inlb
License Plate Light Mounting Screws 1.2 0.12 11 inlb

Torque and Locking Agent
Torque
Fastener
Nm kgfm ftlb
Remarks
Crankcase Bolt (M6, L = 32 mm) 19.6 2.0 14 S
Crankcase Bolts (M6, L = 38 mm) 19.6 2.0 14 S
Crankcase Bolts (M6, L = 45 mm) 19.6 2.0 14 S
Crankcase Bolts (M8, L = 50 mm) 27.5 2.8 20 S
Crankcase Bolts (M8, L = 60 mm) 35 3.6 26 MO, S
Crankcase Bolts (M8, L = 73 mm) 35 3.6 26 MO, S
Crankcase Bolts (M9, L = 113 mm) 44 4.5 32 MO, S
Crankcase Bolts (M9, L = 83 mm) 44 4.5 32 MO, S
Upper Crankcase Bolt (M8, L = 120 mm) 27.5 2.8 20 S
Upper Crankcase Bolts (M8, L = 110 mm) 27.5 2.8 20 S
Oil Pipe Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L
Oil Plate Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L
Shift Shaft Return Spring Pin 29 3.0 21 L
Timing Rotor Bolt 40 4.1 30
Drive Shaft Bearing Holder Screw 4.9 0.50 43 inlb L
Gear Positioning Lever Bolt 12 1.2 106 inlb L
Neutral Switch 15 1.5 11
Neutral Switch Holder Screw 4.9 0.50 43 inlb L
Oil Jet Nozzle 2.9 0.30 26 inlb L
Shift Drum Bearing Holder Screws 4.9 0.50 43 inlb L
Shift Drum Cam Bolt 12 1.2 106 inlb L
Shift Lever Bolt 12 1.2 106 inlb L
Shift Rod Plate Bolt 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L
Shift Shaft Cover Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L (3)
Shift Shaft Cover Screw 4.9 0.50 43 inlb L
Transmission Case Bolts 20 2.0 15
Wheels/Tires
Front Axle 108 11.0 80
Front Axle Clamp Bolt 20 2.0 15
Rear Axle Nut 108 11.0 80
Final Drive
Engine Sprocket Nut 125 12.7 92 MO
Rear Axle Nut 108 11.0 80
Rear Sprocket Nuts 59 6.0 44
Speed Sensor Bolt 7.8 0.80 69 inlb L
Speed Sensor Bracket Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Brakes
Bleed Valve 7.8 0.80 69 inlb
Brake Hose Banjo Bolts 25 2.5 18
Brake Lever Pivot Bolt 1.0 0.10 9 inlb Si
Brake Lever Pivot Bolt Locknut 5.9 0.60 52 inlb
Front Brake Disc Mounting Bolts 27 2.8 20 L

Torque and Locking Agent
Torque
Fastener
Nm kgfm ftlb
Remarks
Throttle Body Assy Holder Bolts 12 1.2 106 inlb
Cylinder Bolt (M8) 27.5 2.8 20 MO,S
Cylinder Nut (M10) 49 5.0 36 MO, S
Cylinder Bolts (M6) 12 1.2 106 inlb
Exhaust Pipe Manifold Holder Nuts 17 1.7 12
Muffler Body Mounting Bolt (Front) 20 2.0 15
Muffler Body Mounting Bolt (Rear) 20 2.0 15
Clutch
Clutch Cable Clamp Bolt 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Clutch Cable Holder Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L
Clutch Cover Mounting Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Clutch Hub Nut 130 13.3 96
Clutch Lever Clamp Bolts 7.8 0.80 69 inlb S
Clutch Spring Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Timing Rotor Bolt Cap 4.9 0.50 43 inlb
Oil Filler Plug Hand-tighten
Oil Pump Chain Guide Bolts 12 1.2 106 inlb L (1)
Oil Pump Sprocket Bolt 12 1.2 106 inlb L, Lh
Timing Inspection Cap 3.9 0.40 35 inlb
Engine Lubrication System
Engine Oil Drain Bolt 30 3.1 22
Filter Plate Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L
Holder Mounting Bolt 25 2.5 18 L
Lower Fairing Bracket Bolts 12 1.2 106 inlb L
Oil Filter 17.5 1.8 13 EO, R
Oil Pan Bolts 12 1.2 106 inlb
Oil Passage Plug 20 2.0 15 L
Oil Pipe Plate Bolt 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L
Oil Plate Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L
Oil Pressure Relief Valve 15 1.5 11 L
Oil Pressure Switch 15 1.5 11 SS
Oil Pump Chain Guide Bolts 12 1.2 106 inlb L (1)
Oil Pump Cover Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L
Oil Pump Sprocket Bolt 12 1.2 106 inlb L, Lh
Engine Removal/Installation
Engine Mounting Bracket Bolts 25 2.5 18 S
Front Engine Mounting Bolts 44 4.5 32 S
Rear Engine Mounting Nuts 44 4.5 32 S
Crankshaft/Transmission
Breather Plate Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L
Race Holder Screw 4.9 0.50 43 inlb L
Connecting Rod Big End Nuts see Text ← ←
Crankcase Bolt (M8, L = 110 mm) 27.5 2.8 20 S

Torque and Locking Agent
The following tables list the tightening torque for the major fasteners requiring use of a
non-permanent locking agent or silicone sealant etc.
Letters used in the Remarks column mean:
AL: Tighten the two clamp bolts alternately two times to ensure even tightening torque.
EO: Apply engine oil.
L: Apply a non-permanent locking agent to the threads.
Lh: Left-hand Threads
MO: Apply molybdenum disulfide oil solution.
(mixture of the engine oil and molybdenum disulfide grease in a weight ratio 10 : 1)
R: Replacement Parts
S: Follow the specified tightening sequence.
Si: Apply silicone grease (ex. PBC grease).
SS: Apply silicone sealant.
Torque
Fastener
Nm kgfm ftlb
Remarks
Fuel System (DFI)
Fuel Pump Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb L, S
Right Switch Housing Screws 3.5 0.36 31 inlb
Sidestand Switch Bolt 3.9 0.40 35 inlb L
Crankshaft Sensor Bolts 6.0 0.61 53 inlb
Oxygen Sensor (Europe Models) 44.1 4.5 33
Spark Plugs 15 1.5 11
Speed Sensor Bolt 7.8 0.80 69 inlb
Timing Rotor Bolt 40 4.1 30
Water Temperature Sensor 12 1.2 106 inlb
Cooling System
Baffle Plate Bolts 5.9 0.60 52 inlb
Radiator Bolt 15 1.5 11
Radiator Hose Clamp Screws 2.0 0.20 18 inlb
Thermostat Housing Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Water Pump Cover Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Water Pump Drain Bolt 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Water Pump Impeller Bolt 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Water Temperature Sensor 12 1.2 106 inlb
Engine Top End
Air Suction Valve Cover Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Baffle Plate Bolts 5.9 0.60 52 inlb
Camshaft Cap Bolts 12 1.2 106 inlb S
Camshaft Chain Tensioner Cap Bolt 20 2.0 15
Camshaft Chain Tensioner Mounting Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Camshaft Sprocket Bolts 15 1.5 11 L
Cylinder Head Bolts (M10) 56 5.7 41 MO, S
Cylinder Head Bolts (M6) 12 1.2 106 inlb S
Cylinder Head Cover Bolts 9.8 1.0 87 inlb
Rear Camshaft Chain Guide Bolts 20 2.0 15 L


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post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 11:31 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks - I had no idea you could buy one that cheap. I paid a bunch of money for the inch pound wrench I have.
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post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 11:33 AM Thread Starter
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Most informative and helpful. Thanks.

You guys are the greatest.
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post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 01:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Machog View Post
Hope you can decipher these charts from the Versys service manual.

Not all are in foot/lbs, many are inch/lbs, which because they are smaller and more frail are the critical ones.


Machog
if only there was a simple to understand consistent measurement system that would do away with all these conversion factors within the same measurement system. that would make life so much easier




oh wait there there is
its called the metric system.. its a simple to understand reasonably consistent system and it what the bike was designed with (all those metric bolts & nuts....

even the stick in the mud Brits have (largely) gone metric. I am of that generation where metrication came in, so I'm slightly schizoid using either measurement system (Imperial or Metric) depending on use (I buy beer in pints... not the short measure US pints), I buy petrol in litres but work out fuel consumption in MPG. those of a younger generation are nearly all metric. if only the UK politicians had the balls of the Australian's who went fully metric years ago.

Last edited by healdem; 06-16-2009 at 04:59 PM.
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post #11 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 02:04 PM
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Originally Posted by healdem View Post
if only the politicians had the balls of the Australian's who went fully metric years ago.
As far as nuts and bolts I believe pretty much everyone is already on metric. I can't remember that last time I saw a standard nut or bolt. But then again nothing is truely produced in the U.S. anymore.

The main thing holding the U.S. back from a full conversion is $$$$. It will take hundreds of millions (if not billions) just to change all of the speed limit signs and readjust the mile markers.
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post #12 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 04:25 PM
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[QUOTE=healdem;40597]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Machog View Post
Hope you can decipher these charts from the Versys service manual.

Not all are in foot/lbs, many are inch/lbs, which because they are smaller and more frail are the critical ones.


Machog/QUOTE]

if only there was a simple to understand consistent measurement system that would do away with all these conversion factors within the same measurement system. that would make life so much easier




oh wait there there is
its called the metric system.. its a simple to understand reasonably consistent system and it what the bike was designed with (all those metric bolts & nuts....

even the stick in the mud Brits have (largely) gone metric. I am of that generation where metrication came in, so I'm slightly schizoid using either measurement system (Imperial or Metric) depending on use (I buy beer in pints... not the short measure US pints), I buy petrol in litres but work out fuel consumption in MPG. those of a younger generation are nearly all metric. if only the politicians had the balls of the Australian's who went fully metric years ago.
No conversion needed, my torque wrenches all have metric and standard on them.

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post #13 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 07:43 PM
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By Mudarra: No conversion needed, my torque wrenches all have metric and standard on them.

It be easier to use with all those torque figures to use.

My V Blog:
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Ride safe,
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Last edited by stlee29; 06-16-2009 at 07:45 PM.
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post #14 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 08:48 PM
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ye\h my torque wrenches have both metric and imperial values on them
the difference is the metric values are consistent (in Newton Metres), whereas thje imperial calibrartions are eiother foot pounds or inch pounds. the consistency of unit means that I can use which ever wrench is nearest with the correct range, rather than having tro dick about doing a conversion to or from inch or foot pounds.

theres many who would argue that 'standard' measurement has no real meaning as it largely depends on what the national standards board specifies has standard. de facto the SI system is the worldwide standard. if evidence were needed look at the daft differences int eh imperial system, especially when comparing US & UK volumes.

seeing as the threads of the bolts on the Versysa are metric it makes sense to use the SI units... you should mnot get such obtuse values as you will changing to imperial or us measurement
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post #15 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 08:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by healdem View Post
if only there was a simple to understand consistent measurement system that would do away with all these conversion factors within the same measurement system. that would make life so much easier




oh wait there there is
its called the metric system.. its a simple to understand reasonably consistent system and it what the bike was designed with (all those metric bolts & nuts....



That was funny.

You know that in the end, it's all your fault really. You guys gave us this stupid imperial measurement system 300 years ago and now we are stuck with it because we are not smart enough to grasp the metric system...

Should have been colonized by the French, at least they got the measurement system right....

Gustavo


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post #16 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 10:14 PM
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Use both. Most "American" cars do.





I think its funny that people get in a tiff about Imperial vs metric.
My maintenance manual lists all torques in both. So its not really a problem.
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post #17 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-16-2009, 10:44 PM
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Jfgi

I know how to convert stuff and I don't bother anymore.
There is an easy way to convert any standard unit and many lame units.

http://www.socuteurl.com/howdybunny


Metric for life.
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post #18 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-17-2009, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shatrat View Post
I know how to convert stuff and I don't bother anymore.
There is an easy way to convert any standard unit and many lame units.

http://www.socuteurl.com/howdybunny


Metric for life.
Hm, not very useful.
The site can't even do the often used $h1t-load to F-tonne conversion...

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post #19 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-17-2009, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Should have been colonized by the French, at least they got the measurement system right
Merde, I would rather be colonized by real frogs.

FYI, "Among the first supporters for a metric system was an Englishman, Royal Society founder John Wilkins (1614-1672) in 1668. Gabriel Mouton also supported such a system in 1670. (French always a day late $ short etc)
The foundation for the metric SI system (Systme International d'Units) was the "Metre Convention" signed by 17 countries on May 20, 1875. This is one version of who invented it."

More proof; http://www.strategypage.com/military.../567-8055.aspx

What we need is a war against the French, with the Germans-haven't had that combination before-its a sure fired winner.

Machog


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post #20 of 22 (permalink) Old 06-20-2009, 03:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by basby View Post
As far as nuts and bolts I believe pretty much everyone is already on metric. I can't remember that last time I saw a standard nut or bolt. But then again nothing is truely produced in the U.S. anymore.

The main thing holding the U.S. back from a full conversion is $$$$. It will take hundreds of millions (if not billions) just to change all of the speed limit signs and readjust the mile markers.
Australia did it years ago. We didn't go broke. Metric money, metric distance, metric weight, metric time ...

An old friend visited a year or so ago. He's an Australian who's been living in the US for twenty years. In his industry they measure in feet and hundredths of a foot. That is really weird.

You can help make Clem a household name

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