Fuel Injection light stays on - Kawasaki Versys Forum
 
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 08:34 PM Thread Starter
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Fuel Injection light stays on

The V has been running great for the most part until yesterday ('09, 10,000+ miles, owned for a little over 1 year). I came out of work to ride home, and tried to start the bike. It went through all the normal pre-start diagnostics, but the FI light stayed on. I wasn't really paying attention so started it anyway. . . . It ran kind of poorly, so I was freaked out that I'd started it with FI light on, and turned it off right away.

Then thought about it a minute and decided that I really needed to get home anyway. The second time was same as the first. FI stayed on, but bike started. I revved it a bit, and the light went out.

I'd had similar thing happen in the past, and just disconnected power briefly, which reset computer and bike seemed fine after that. So, tried that again--probably not the smartest thing to do, but needed to be said in the interests of full disclosure and all. . . . Anyway, went to ride into work this morning, and the thing is having same issues w/ FI light and it wasn't running very well. Revving didn't clear the FI light this time, and weather was poor anyway, so decided I didn't want to be stranded in bad weather w/ bike not running, so took old carbed bike instead!

Anyway, (yeah, I know this is getting long), looked up problems w/ Fuel injection light and decided to try to read the self-diagnostic codes. It turns out the bike is throwing a "code 11--Main Throttle sensor". . . . I haven't done any recent mods or maintenance, so don't think this is because of anything I've done necessarily--well did put new mirrors on last night, but problem had already manifested at that point.

So, now what? Will adjusting the TPS help? I found a thread on that. This is my first fuel injected bike, and really have no experience working on one except what you've read above. Thanks for any help or advice you can give.

GDI
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 08:41 PM
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For starters, is you normal warmed up idle set to 1,300 rpm?

You could then try reading the main throttle sensor voltage output with ignition on and engine stopped, at idle position and at WOT, or at least try rotating main throttle sensor counterclockwise by about 1/16" as seen at its green reference mark in front.
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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 08:50 PM
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Here's even more info than you might need:

Quote:
Originally Posted by invader View Post
Instead of going through the throuble of measuring TPS output voltage, you can try rotating your main throttle sensor by almost 1mm by relating to the green index mark. You can then rotate subthrottle sensor also counterclockwise to reduce cold-engine fast-idle rpm if desired...

http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums...ead.php?t=1412

Look at the main (grey) throttle sensor's green alignment mark on its front from near your front left flasher, and note how it ligns up. Loosen sensor screw with T25 Torx tool. Rotate sensor counterclockwise by about half a millimeter as seen on pic. Adjust, then tighten Torx screw. Main throttle sensor's new position:



Main throttle sensor Torx screw:



Fast idle may then be higher. You can rotate subthrottle sensor (black, just above main throttle sensor) also counterclockwise with T25 Torx screw to reduce cold fast-idle rpm. I rotated mine to its maximum counterclockwise position, to which it was already near. Subthrottle sensor's new position:



According to service manual:

"Throttle Grip Free Play: 2-3 mm
If the throttle grip doesn’t return properly, check the throttle cable routing, grip free play, and cable damage. Then lubricate the throttle cable.
To adjust, loosen the locknut at the upper end of the accelerator cable. (under throttle grip) Turn the adjuster in completely so as to give the throttle grip plenty of play. Loosen the locknut at the middle of the decelerator cable. (see pic) Turn the adjuster until there is no play when the throttle grip is completely closed. Tighten the locknut. Turn the accelerator cable adjuster until the proper amount of throttle grip free play is obtained. Tighten the locknut."

You can easily pull the mid-cable adjuster that runs over the engine, adjust it then check with cable back up in its natural position. Shown here with locknut loosened and backed up to the right:


Last edited by invader; 05-30-2013 at 08:52 PM.
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 10:27 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the quick responses. Why yes, the normal, warmed-up idle is 1300rpm or thereabouts.

I did by chance find that other thread, where you had adjusted the sensors counter-clockwise a bit, before starting this one. I had considered going ahead with that, but then as now am not sure how to interpret the fault that was thrown. Do you think that will fix the problem? Or, are we more looking for additional data points? I'll try it either way, but not tonight--it's late and must be to work in the morning. . . .

I'll post up the results this weekend.

GDI
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 10:36 PM
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I'd try adjusting it counterclockwise to see what it does. You could also measure its output voltage sweeping from idle to WOT. You can't get just the main throttle sensor on its own, it seems. I haven't found another source. You'd have to replace the entire throttle bodies assembly.

Last edited by invader; 05-30-2013 at 10:53 PM.
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 10:53 PM
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Lightbulb

MAYBE it ingested some moisture and could be dried off with a 5~10 minute blast of the hair blower!
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-31-2013, 04:03 AM
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Garage
For us here in the tropics, if the FI lights comes on frequently, its the VDS ( Vehicle Down Sensor ).

Its a sensor somewhere near the rear suspension. Its a sensor to detect if the vehicle is down or not. If its down, it will cut off the engine.

The sensor is somewhat exposed ( to water, dirt and so on ). and over time can become faulty and thus the FI light comes on.

Just a suggestion. cheers.
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-31-2013, 10:37 AM Thread Starter
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It has been very humid here of late. I rode into work in a thick fog that morning--the kind that builds up on the shield and acts like a light rain. The bike has been sitting in my shop with a dehumidifier running, so should be dried out by now as it's been in there a good 36 hours now. If adjusting the TPS doesn't do anything, I'll try the hair-dryer.

I'm pretty sure it's not the vehicle down sensor. It's definitely throwing a code 11, not a code 31. Though conditions here have been somewhat tropical, moisture-wise. I think the warmest this week was the low 80s (27 degrees C), so not terribly warm.

I still haven't had a chance to look at it since I started this thread. . . .

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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-01-2013, 01:40 PM Thread Starter
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Well, I adjusted the TPS and the sub-throttle sensor. While I was down there I noticed that some water ran off the engine towards the back. So, the water had collected somewhere and the dehumidifier hadn't dried it up completely. The fuel injection light stayed on when I started the bike. It ran poorly, but continued to run. The fuel injection light would go out if I revved it to 3000 rpms or so, but then come back on as the rpms dropped. I noticed the smell of unburnt fuel was building up in the garage, so decided to go for a short ride. The FI light went out, after a bit and stayed off. By the time I got back the bike was running normally, but I wasn't sure about the adjustments I'd made, so I restored them to near factory settings. After that I went for a longer, 30-mile ride, and everything was back to normal. Today, I went for another longer ride, and no problems with FI light at all.

Now I've got around 130 miles on since having the issue w/ FI light. I think something got some water in it, and it just needed to dry out. I don't remember having read about anyone else having trouble w/ water getting in somewhere and causing trouble like this. . . . Is there something I can do to prevent this short of not riding in the rain? Any thoughts?

thanks,

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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-03-2013, 10:30 AM Thread Starter
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new symptoms

I took the Versys to work today. It ran like crap! The weather was better, so just went for it even though the FI light was on and I ended up pulling over to the side of the road 3 times. I actually had to let cars pass me twice, because the bike wouldn't maintain speed. It would be running at full power and then suddenly die throwing me forward against the tank, and the bike would slow down and barely keep running. I actually turned it off and restarted it a couple times.

The only difference between today and the excellent ride I had on Saturday was that today was colder--50 degrees F, and I was getting low on fuel. It was showing 1 bar on the gauge, so thought maybe fresh gas would fix the problem. I got to the gas station and decided to only put 2 gallons in as I didn't want to have to wrestle a full tank if I have to take the tank off the bike later. Fresh gas did seem to improve things. It still bucked a little for the first mile after adding fuel, but then it was fine after that. So, 12 miles of a very poorly performing Versys before adding gas, and 12 miles after with much-improved performance. . . .

So, maybe I've got bad gas/water in the gas? I have recently switched to non-ethanol gas w/ 91 octane thinking that my mileage might improve enough to cover the difference in cost between the 10% ethanol and the high octane, non-ethanol gas. Now, I'm thinking maybe I should go back to the 10% ethanol to dissolve any remaining water and get it out of the fuel system?

Or, could it be that there is something else causing these symptoms, rather than the gas itself--could it be more to do with having a low fuel level?

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post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-03-2013, 04:55 PM
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The problem was and still is with your main throttle sensor (or its circuit/connector, etc) as indicated by FI trouble code # 11.
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post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-03-2013, 05:08 PM
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post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-04-2013, 09:59 AM Thread Starter
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Yah, you're right--I ran all that gas through 'er yesterday. I went for a longish, 150-mile ride and refueled with the 10% ethanol, 87 octane gas. Bike is acting nearly as bad even after rotating the TPS 1/16" like you'd indicated earlier.

It does seem to get a little better when the temps are higher, but problem is still there especially when the engine is cold or temps are lower.

I've ordered the '09 sensor, so will have to see if that fixes it.

Thanks, Invader.

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post #14 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-24-2013, 06:38 PM Thread Starter
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Well, I ended up taking the V into have it fixed. There's a good independent shop in town, so I took it there. I told them everything I knew, gave them the TPS that I bought off Ebay, and turned them loose on the bike. They did some testing and got back to me saying that the TPS was not the problem. They figured that the ECU was bad and suggested a new one. They got one (used) in and tried it but no joy--problem was still there. They had done some further testing and suggested that there was excessive "secondary throttle blade freeplay". So, we're waiting on parts again. Hopefully it'll be fixed by the weekend.

I've been riding my '99 Honda Shadow VT1100c, but I sure miss the Versys!

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