Front sprocket nut - Page 2 - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #21 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 07:32 PM
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All this venom vented on Kawasaki and the Versys about the tight sprocket nut! This a common occurrence on chain drive bikes. A quick Google search shows the same situation on many brands of bikes including Triumph, Suzuki, Honda, Yamaha and others.

Also a number of videos on YouTube on how to remove them.

Fortunately for me, I had a large compressor and air impact gun from the last bike I had changed the front sprocket on.
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post #22 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 08:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Buffalo_Bob View Post
All this venom vented on Kawasaki and the Versys about the tight sprocket nut! This a common occurrence on chain drive bikes. A quick Google search shows the same situation on many brands of bikes including Triumph, Suzuki, Honda, Yamaha and others.

My thoughts exactly! Note: I've seen this often on Suzukis.


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Fortunately for me, I had a large compressor and air impact gun from the last bike I had changed the front sprocket on.
Same here!

I still have a full deck.
I just shuffle slower.

Note: I have no time to waste because Iím older at this moment than Iíve ever been before,
Ö and itís the youngest Iím ever going to get.
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post #23 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 09:46 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Buffalo_Bob View Post
All this venom vented on Kawasaki and the Versys about the tight sprocket nut! This a common occurrence on chain drive bikes. A quick Google search shows the same situation on many brands of bikes including Triumph, Suzuki, Honda, Yamaha and others.

Also a number of videos on YouTube on how to remove them.

Fortunately for me, I had a large compressor and air impact gun from the last bike I had changed the front sprocket on.
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Originally Posted by quexpress View Post
My thoughts exactly! Note: I've seen this often on Suzukis.


Same here!


Yep, yep and yep!!!

If I buy a vehicle and it breaks down (because this is what I have, a non-functioning vehicle) and I'm supposed to be OK with this??? This whole thing started with a crappy OEM chain that should have gotten a few more thousand miles on it.

Again, easy to say when you don't have this problem. And I counter your claims that all of these other brands have the same problem. I've been watching my own YouTube videos on Versys and other Kawasaki front sprocket changes. I started laughing watching how many videos weren't even touching the front sprocket!!! What does that tell you, other than that thing is such a nuisance that they know better than to try. The one guy, it took him 2 hours and 4 different methods to finally break that nut. And ya'll are OK with this??? Alright, if that's how you all feel.

I get that all of your experiences have been successful. But mine hasn't and that's what I go on. And I can tell you every bike I've owned, none of them had this issue. So that's where my experience lies.

Even the other guy that has a front end ready to fall off...I'm not buying that this is due to the local shop putting the bike together. I'm in total belief it's a lack of quality control at Kawasaki.

But I digress, it's always easy to say that ____ is a perfect product when everything is working. But when it doesn't and you have to go through this nonsense! I'd like to see any of you be happy about it.


I'll lay off the Versys bashing for now but I will post after the dealership takes care of it. I'll be bringing it down on Saturday and leaving it there until it's fixed. Which means I'll be shelling out more $$$.
My apologies if I'm ruffling feathers as it's not my intention. I cannot wait until I can get rid of this motorcycle. You all enjoy yours and, SERIOUSLY, I'm glad you all love yours and they're up and running for you.
Ride safe and enjoy.
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post #24 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 09:54 PM
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<SNIP>.....Couldn't have said it better, I also want to point out, in that link I posted, Invader mentioned using a 1 1/16 is tighter than the 27mm socket. .... <SNIP>

Wait...are you saying, or implying, or informing us that somehow Kawasaki has sourced a metric nut that is less accurate than the SAE equivalent?? Is using a 1 1/16" socket a more exact fit than a 27mm socket on a 27mm nut?

#insane
One thing I have discovered as a super mod on this forum, some people are just too lazy to look or do a little search, so they start a new thread. I will copy his post, I mentioned post #10, here it is ;
I was asking svannie if he had a 26 mm socket to confirm its fit on the nut, because he used a 27 mm, and the 1-16" (26.9875 mm) socket is a bit slack on it. A 12 point 1-1/16" socket can tend to slip and eat at the nut's edges... A 1-1/2" X 2-7/8" length of wood across the swingarm, and an extension pipe on 1/2" drive breaker bar worked fine for me, but it has to be well padded to protect the swingarm's thin aluminum wall and paint. That's why I really like svannie's simple and highly effective sprocket lock.

Notice a 1 1/16 socket is 26.9875 mm,, and yes I have a metric 1 1/16 impact six point socket, and yes it fits better than the 27mm impact socket.
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post #25 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 11:18 PM
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Yep, yep and yep!!!

If I buy a vehicle and it breaks down (because this is what I have, a non-functioning vehicle) and I'm supposed to be OK with this??? This whole thing started with a crappy OEM chain that should have gotten a few more thousand miles on it.


I'll lay off the Versys bashing for now but I will post after the dealership takes care of it. I'll be bringing it down on Saturday and leaving it there until it's fixed. Which means I'll be shelling out more $$$.
My apologies if I'm ruffling feathers as it's not my intention. I cannot wait until I can get rid of this motorcycle. You all enjoy yours and, SERIOUSLY, I'm glad you all love yours and they're up and running for you.
Ride safe and enjoy.
150% on the crappy chain, like Ford and GM, everyone cuts corners. My 07 Versys had 30,000 KM on the original chain when I sold it. My 2015 the chain was garbage from day one, at 12,000 KM I scraped it, one six inch section was stretched , DID chain, ever hear of a chain exploding , DID chain, don't buy it, I went with EK chain https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forum...978-post7.html Twisted Throttle carries it.

As to the sprocket nut, no doubt it is a bad design , as a professional , when you are faced with what has been known as a challenge, you take a close look. Just like when you have a bolt that is almost 100% seized in a blind hole, if you have movement then it gets tight, you don't apply more force, you start applying a lube and or heat, applying WD40 or something similar, letting it soak, working backwards and forwards, you eventually get it out.
If you look closely the sprocket nut already has chamfer corners, a six point socket is meant to drive on the flats, a good impact socket will have rounded corners, that nut lacks sufficient surface area for the force that it is torqued to, there is a reason, the last thing you want is to replace the splined shaft.

Believe it or not but impact sockets are all six point and a set is usually cheaper than a regular socket set. Here is a set for $25 And a word of advice, never use a regular 12 point socket with a air impact or electric impact, I have seen them ( 12 point socket) explode, dam near killed a guy, what I am saying is, it is dangerous and very unprofessional
10mm, 13mm, 14mm, 15mm, 17mm, 18mm, 19mm, 21mm, 22mm, 24mm, 27mm, 30mm, 32mm

https://www.harborfreight.com/13-pc-...set-69279.html

Thought of a comparison with my car, a 2005 CE Toyota Sienna AWD, yup, came with runflats , try finding a place that can change a tire on a alloy rim, yes, in desperation I went to Canadian tire, fortunately the service manager stepped in and told the kid that was almost succeeding in destroying my alloy rim, that to stop, and for me to go somewhere else. I went to a tire dealer that changed these tires, it takes two people and a very special machine to change 1 tire, worth $400, Toyota replaced them under warranty, next time they wore out I replaced them with regular tires and got a full size spare. The reason was the AWD didn't have room for a spare and be able to fold the seats down, so if I want a sheet of plywood, I take the middle two seats out, and take my spare out and ratchet tie it down using the middle seat in floor mounts.

This forum is one of the most active I know of, I can only speak for myself, 90% of advice given is from my own experience or from advice given to me by others and I followed that advice. Many times I leave specifics out such as never use a 12 point with a impact, because I am a multi-trade person and have been there and done that. Try getting called in at 11PM on a 100 HP motor with bearing failure and you can't get the drive coupling off, you are by yourself and need to use heat and the impact on the 3 jaw puller, you get it moving about a inch and the pullers come off. Yes now you need to let things cool down and start over, the next time you put a visegrip chain wrench around the pullers to keep the jaws in place. Try removing four 3/8 silicone bronze bolt, fastening a 1/4 by 4 inch copper buss , bolted between several 1/4 by 12 inch copper buss with a 1 1/8 inch gap between, lots of patience , professional long open and box end wrenches.

Anyway most of us take the time and effort to try and help others, rarely is a post ignored, responding to your posts, at times can be intimidating, and yet I still respond, as maybe someone else may learn from this.

BTW , even I take things to the dealer , glad I did with the Sienna, drive shaft was over $2000 , had a aftermarket rebuilt installed, about 2 months over a year I noticed a vibration at above 100 KM/HR, thought it was the multifit rims ( scraped those rims and got the proper hub-centric rims ) with the snow tires, when I put the summer tires on it was still there. My excellent dealer said they could get the U joints for the front part, they replaced it for like $200, I came back as it was worse, in the end they called me and said it would take another day, they replaced the whole drive shaft at their cost , the one I had originally installed over a year ago was a aftermarket something like $1100. That is customer service. No way I was putting it up on ramps and jacking the rear up, and it would have cost me $1100 , not $200 what I paid, plus they washed the car after
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post #26 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-11-2019, 11:49 PM
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I will bet that 90% of the people who have this engine don't know what a PITA this job is. They take the bike to the dealer to do it. When you do your own maintenance it pays to research how to do the job and decided if it's worth doing yourself. This is one that may be best left to the dealer. I know it should be simple to do, but others experience has proven not so.

That said, I will still try to do it myself when the time comes, but if it will not come apart with what I have and the tips in this forum, I will take it to the dealer to at least break the nut loose. Not using the tools correctly or the correct tool and damaging yourself or the bike could be a hard lesson to learn. Is it worth the aggravation or money spent on tooling you might not use often??

There are many times that you can use SAE tools on metric fasteners or the other way around. The difference between the 1 1/16" and the 27mm is only 0.0125mm. A 10mm fastener is one of the few that doesn't have a SAE equivalent.
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post #27 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 12:00 AM
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If the dealer does the job, will the nut be just as tight as from the factory? Or if properly torqued will it likely be removable with hand tools in the future at the next chain replacement?
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post #28 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 08:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Devilsfan View Post
Yep, yep and yep!!!

If I buy a vehicle and it breaks down (because this is what I have, a non-functioning vehicle) and I'm supposed to be OK with this??? This whole thing started with a crappy OEM chain that should have gotten a few more thousand miles on it.

Again, easy to say when you don't have this problem. And I counter your claims that all of these other brands have the same problem. I've been watching my own YouTube videos on Versys and other Kawasaki front sprocket changes. I started laughing watching how many videos weren't even touching the front sprocket!!! What does that tell you, other than that thing is such a nuisance that they know better than to try. The one guy, it took him 2 hours and 4 different methods to finally break that nut. And ya'll are OK with this??? Alright, if that's how you all feel.

I get that all of your experiences have been successful. But mine hasn't and that's what I go on. And I can tell you every bike I've owned, none of them had this issue. So that's where my experience lies.

Even the other guy that has a front end ready to fall off...I'm not buying that this is due to the local shop putting the bike together. I'm in total belief it's a lack of quality control at Kawasaki.

But I digress, it's always easy to say that ____ is a perfect product when everything is working. But when it doesn't and you have to go through this nonsense! I'd like to see any of you be happy about it.


I'll lay off the Versys bashing for now but I will post after the dealership takes care of it. I'll be bringing it down on Saturday and leaving it there until it's fixed. Which means I'll be shelling out more $$$.
My apologies if I'm ruffling feathers as it's not my intention. I cannot wait until I can get rid of this motorcycle. You all enjoy yours and, SERIOUSLY, I'm glad you all love yours and they're up and running for you.
Ride safe and enjoy.

I sure that this can get very frustrating. However I can tell you that I'm very satisfied with my Versys ... but I'm definitely not brand biased.
If $$$ was not a problem, I would certainly have a Triumph, and a Honda, and a KTM, etc, etc. For the time being, I can only afford to have one (my Versys).

In the past I've had a Harley, BSA, Honda's, Suzuki's and now a Kawasaki.
Any problems encountered on my Versys had also been experienced on either my past bikes or on fellow riders' bikes (not Kawasakis).
Best of luck with your bike at the dealership.

I still have a full deck.
I just shuffle slower.

Note: I have no time to waste because Iím older at this moment than Iíve ever been before,
Ö and itís the youngest Iím ever going to get.
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post #29 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 01:54 PM
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If the dealer does the job, will the nut be just as tight as from the factory? Or if properly torqued will it likely be removable with hand tools in the future at the next chain replacement?
I only needed 'help' to remove the countershaft-sprocket-nut ONCE - on my '15. Then after I re-installed it, torqued CORRECTLY to 122 pound/feet (or I BELIEVE the figure is 92#/' by memory on the Gen 1s...), I've NEVER had issues removing it afterwards.

And if you follow the "jdrocks" build (https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forum...ml#post1613473) he found that nut ONLY finger-tight on his low-mileage engine....

GO FIGURE!

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post #30 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 02:56 PM
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I only needed 'help' to remove the countershaft-sprocket-nut ONCE - on my '15. Then after I re-installed it, torqued CORRECTLY to 122 pound/feet (or I BELIEVE the figure is 92#/' by memory on the Gen 1s...), I've NEVER had issues removing it afterwards.

And if you follow the "jdrocks" build (https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forum...ml#post1613473) he found that nut ONLY finger-tight on his low-mileage engine....

GO FIGURE!
On my 2015, the countershaft sprocket nut came off "quite easily" with only 120 lbs of pressure on my compressor. I was expecting to need to raise the air pressure but was pleasantly surprised.

I still have a full deck.
I just shuffle slower.

Note: I have no time to waste because Iím older at this moment than Iíve ever been before,
Ö and itís the youngest Iím ever going to get.
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post #31 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 06:21 PM Thread Starter
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Holy Sweet Mother of God!

I went and bought a 27mm air impact socket last night. Figured I'd give it a "quick" go (because I really wanted to get this thing off on my own - now more than ever). Since I didn't have my air compressor up I figured to give it a go by hand. I wasn't planning on spending too much time on it as all it would do would increase my blood pressure.

Needless to say, I gave it everything I had and the wrench slipped and chip off part of the lube-catcher (?) part.

That's when I stopped, took the pups for a walk to calm down. Fast forward to 1:30 am and I'm wide awake. Can't stop thinking about this stupid nut.

Made plans to drop the bike off tomorrow but when I got home I figured to give it a go with the air compressor. I used the "long-socket-in between-the-sprocket-and-frame" trick. I went easy at first, about 20 quick zips at 120 lbs. Nothing. Then decided to flatten that washer ALL THE WAY AROUND. Tried it again. About 10 more zips at 120 lbs. Still nothing.

Then I turned up the air compressor to 150 lbs. About 10 quick zips and...BAM!!!


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post #32 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-13-2019, 08:49 AM
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Glad you got it off.

Some times the trick with an impact is to start out slow then increase the trigger pull. The slow taps help to seat the socket/ bit and cause a little bit of heat to be generated. Kind of like using a torch. You also have to keep at it until the part yields.

I didn't think about this until now, at work we use a shop made tool called a screw buster. It is used with a rivet gun to provide impact and has a handle to provide the turning. ie poor mans impact gun. You would use the impact without turning for a while than add the torque. Worked great on cross point screws, not sure if it would have worked here as there is too much torque on the nut.
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post #33 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-13-2019, 09:10 AM
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Glad you got it off.

Some times the trick with an impact is to start out slow then increase the trigger pull. The slow taps help to seat the socket/ bit and cause a little bit of heat to be generated. Kind of like using a torch. You also have to keep at it until the part yields.

I didn't think about this until now, at work we use a shop made tool called a screw buster. It is used with a rivet gun to provide impact and has a handle to provide the turning. ie poor mans impact gun. You would use the impact without turning for a while than add the torque. Worked great on cross point screws, not sure if it would have worked here as there is too much torque on the nut.
One thing I forgot to mention, since my first 9 years of work, was in a electric motor shop, nothing like getting something in from a chicken barn or slaughter house, lots of corrosion and rust. My biggest regular challenge was lift truck motors, #3 phillips tip flat head screws torqued to about 40 ft pounds. I used a hammer style impact driver, absolutely the only way to take this motor apart, and I would say , every 10th motor my tip would shatter , they paid for the tips. https://www.amazon.ca/Powerbuilt-648...07782525&psc=1 My point about the sprocket nut using a air impact, the impact action is a twisting and hammering action, it want's to bounce away from the sprocket nut, what you want to do is use one hand to push the impact forward while the other holds the trigger, this will prevent the socket from coming off and rounding the corners.


Went for a 340 KM ride today, 80 KM/HR cross winds, I averaged 21 KM/L , that was with the heated grips at 75% and my Gerbing jacket at #6 . So I missed one other thing, the size of the air line and length is critical, 3/8 or 1/2 inch is ideal. I need to take a photo of my flooring nailer set up.

I bought a portable 3 gallon air tank for emergency filling of a tire , one day I was looking at it and came up with a idea. When I was doing work in the basement, my compressor was in the garage, the air line just reached to the bottom of the steps, the air line is 1/4 inch, highly flexible and on a reel, the problem is that even though I set the regulator to 80 LBs, repeated nailing wouldn't work very well, I would get a cleat going in 2/3 of the way every 3rd or fourth strike.
So I got a brass T and added a male quick connect with a petcock, a female quick connect and a short nipple that ties the air tank to the T, so instead of using the valve stem for filling the tank, I connect my 1/4 line from my compressor to the male quick connect, I plug my short 3/8 airline into the female quick connect and the other end is connected to the nailer, I now have 80 LBs with a large volume available, I can now fire nails into the hardwood every 2 seconds .


The red knob is the original valve stem air in and regulator air out, note at first glance looks like something wrong with the pressure gauge, look closer, that is my petcock for fast fill , note it has about 30 LBs in the tank, that was all that was left in my compressor from 24 hours ago.




So the yellow line is from my compressor, the red line is my short line for tools. I have a 3/8 line that I use for the nailer, as the line itself acts as a reservoir.Not a good photo, but notice the gauge isn't covered by the petcock lever, as it is open and pointing towards the yellow airline.





The tank was like $30 at princess auto , can't find it anymore, here is one for the same $$$ https://www.harborfreight.com/5-gall...ank-65594.html
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post #34 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-14-2019, 03:31 AM
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I feel like I missed out by not seeing this post a couple of days ago. Lol.

Am I mistaken in the understanding that this is one of those nuts that tend to tighten under hard acceleration? Honda cars have a similar thing going on with the crank pulley bolt.

Most techs I knew either refused to do Honda timing belts or spent lots of money on impact guns to make sure they had the grunt to remove that nut. And, impact guns tend to get weaker with time and use.

I went through and counted all of the 12 point sockets I've collected over the years as an auto mechanic. It took me a while to find it. I think I bought it for a Chrysler headgasket job I did a long time ago, but I could be wrong.

That's a count of 1, if you missed it.
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post #35 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-14-2019, 07:57 AM Thread Starter
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Lifted the bike, took off the rear tire, changed the rear sprocket and replaced the rear tire with a Shinko Raven 009.

I still wait for a front sprocket as NOBODY in the Tampa area had a sprocket in stock!!! Like my other ranting, you'd think they would keep these things around as chains and sprockets tend to move off the shelves.

So, what have I learned from all this...

(This is MY personal breakdown as a long-time rider but relatively inexperienced DIY mechanic and don't necessarily go in any order.)


1. Do your research BEFORE you buy. And I mean research every forum, article website you can. LOOK for common issues that owners have then ask yourself, should you get stuck with said issues, are you willing to fork out the $$$ and time for a shop to fix or go through the (possible) struggle, which can also be costly and time consuming) to fix it yourself.

2. Don't settle! Like any type of product you wouldn't buy something that you know has flaws and, more importantly, flaws that the manufacturer hasn't fixed. Refer to #1 as far as how willing are you to go to fix it should it happen to you.

3. Research the most common tools that you'll need for the specific motorcycle you're desiring. Really look at the bike in every aspect...with your eyes! Maybe your last motorcycle didn't need a Triple Tree stand because you could work around it with what you have in your garage (2x4's, cruiser jack, etc..) and determine if this is possible with the bike you're eyeing. If not, are you willing to shell out some more $$$ for these items needed?

4. Go into all your local dealerships and ask them what kinds of parts they keep in stock most. Quiz them! Then determine if your desired motorcycle has more chance sitting in the garage waiting for parts to arrive or if there's a high chance you'll be out the door of the dealership with a bag of what you need. Then decide if it's worth it.

5. Keep parts on hand before you need them! Parts can be expensive, especially all at once. Buy quality but buy piecemeal as well. When you have a few $$ left over in your paycheck, get a part or two you know you're going to need in the future.

6. Determine your abilities in both riding and wrenching and build up from there. Since (hopefully) your motorcycle will be on the road more than in the garage on paddock stands weigh the options on a motorcycle other than how it feels when you sit on it. After you've determined what size you're looking for refer to #1 and try to mesh comfort with mechanical quality. With a dithering motorcycle industry quality should be INCREASING as competition starts to tighten up. If a company doesn't change much ask yourself why? Is it because you shouldn't fix something that isn't broken? Or is it because minor issues aren't a concern of theirs?

7. Stand your ground based on your experiences! Just because it doesn't happen to most doesn't mean that you got a lemon. Manufacturers have quality control. In my case, this sprocket nut should NOT have been on that tight. There is NO WAY it was at 122 ft/lbs torque! That's a missed manufacturer flaw. If no other motorcycle brands gave you this much hassle then why should this one? If Kawasaki's engines are better that's great. But what good is an awesome engine if one sprocket nut trumps a great-running engine? Sure, you can take the good with the bad, but in this day and age I believe the all-around expectations should be higher for ALL brands.



I've only been on this forum for a year but hopefully I've posted enough for you to know that I'm not the smartest person nor the most mechanically inclined. I'm also not the most articulate writer! I am aware that there's generally small issues that arise with motorcycles - I get it. And although I am very relieved that I was able to solve this current issue (many thanks to all, both in advice AND reminding me that I need to READ CAREFULLY!) I'm still pretty miffed about a sprocket nut. Kawasaki SHOULD know better and I'm positive they do, yet they haven't made a simple adjustment. Although my blood pressure has settled I am still willing to let this motorcycle go and buy another another brand...because of MY issues. Until then, I'm going to keep the Versys around for another year, ride it as much as I can and enjoy what it does provide better than the other motorcycles. It has a year to redeem itself.
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post #36 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-14-2019, 08:07 AM
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12 pt fasteners are used in aviation. Both nuts and bolts. And now in the global market for both aviation and motor vehicles. You need both metric and SAE, 6 and 12 pt. torx, allen key along with several specialty fasteners. Some can be cross utilized but some need to be the correct shape and size. The correct tool for the job can make all the difference in the world.
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post #37 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-15-2019, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by 52Degrees View Post
...Am I mistaken in the understanding that this is one of those nuts that tend to tighten under hard acceleration?...
The nut CAN NOT move once you torque it, and THEN bend the "locking'" washer over one 'flat'.
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post #38 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-16-2019, 01:55 PM
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I nearly blew my knee out doing the sprocket on my wife's Versys a few years back. I ended up calling the dealer and the mechanic explained to me the issue. I just about took a dremel and cut it off.
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post #39 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-17-2019, 08:39 PM
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i'm happy with my 2008 V because working on it is doable. motorcycles all require considerable more maintenance than a car, part of riding. match the socket to the nut, and although you can get away with using a 12 point on a 6 point nut, any serious application of torque can round the corners of the nut. the nuts who design the nuts don't have the nuts to make them to standard. the original counter sprocket nut was a bitch to get off (had to break down and buy a harbor freight 'earthquake" impact wrench that did the job), but it ended well. when frustrated with a seemingly undoable task, step back, rest ,have a beer and double think it. you'll invariably find the solution.
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post #40 of 52 (permalink) Old 04-18-2019, 07:05 AM
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Devilsfan

I lucked out on my 2011, bought a 600lb impact wrench off craigs list for $50, another $7 for 27mm impact socket from HF, flattened the washer sprayed the nut and shaft with penetrating oil forget pressure maybe 120lbs and after maybe 6 or7 second nut came right off. Of course that was all after trying to break it loose manually with a breaker bar working up a sweat, cursing and all for not.

I agree the nut thing should have been addressed by Kawi, they must install it with a lot more torque, and what is with that nut that has rounded corners to start with.

I hope the bad stuff is behind you and you can just ride and enjoy it. I personally think my 2011 versys is kind of ugly, but have to admit she is fun to ride and does everything I need.

I look at other bikes and in reality would like to have 3 or 4 different ones, but that is not an option, so back to reality and the versys meets my riding needs, it affordable to operate and maintain, for the most part can work on it myself (with the help of this forum) and will be my only ride for a while longer.
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