cold air tire pressure - Kawasaki Versys Forum
 
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-19-2008, 06:05 PM Thread Starter
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cold air tire pressure

temps here are now 31 f high and 19 f low...........

My tires are reading 30 lbs front and back - they are factory tires

speck is 34 front 36 back

should I add air, or is a "little under" like it is now, better? or, ...ok?
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-19-2008, 06:11 PM
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I add or subtract air almost every other ride. I will ride 2 lbs or so less in the cold. 30 rear may be a little too low. I don't think they would be dangerous will just wear faster.
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-19-2008, 08:04 PM
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Spec on my US Versys is 32psi front-not 34psi. Its in my ops manual and on the small sticker on the swing arm by the chain.

Shouldn't think its a huge deal, most gauges aren't that accurate, I have 4 different ones and they are close but not the same.

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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-19-2008, 11:52 PM
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When I picked mine up I asked the mechanic to go 36PSI at both ends. He recommended 36 front, 42 rear which we did, and so far I figure my "V" is the best handling bike I've ever ridden!
Ed
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-20-2008, 10:27 AM Thread Starter
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well, good input all and thanks - I may have mis-read my manual....took a night ride 35min each way last night - left the pressure at 30lbs each - it was 25 f out, 17 f coming back - roads nice and dry and V was lov'n his 8.5k rpms took it easy on the corners, but great to still be riding
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-20-2008, 10:58 AM
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Run the same pressures you normally run in warm weather, just take it a little easier for the first 10 or so minutes of the ride cause they may take a little longer to warm up in the cold air.

I'm not convinced running lower pressures will allow the tires to warm up quicker in the winter.
The biggest benefit for this would be extra traction provided by a bigger contact patch, which IMO would be better utilized for track speeds.
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-20-2008, 10:59 AM
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FWIW - I run 36 rear, and 34 front on my Pilot Power road 2 tires.
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-22-2008, 09:11 AM
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When it's cold like that, you should drop your tire pressures a bit to get some heat into the tires. I'm not as concerned about tire mileage so I run 32/33. At those temps I'd run 30/30 or so. FYI, reduced air pressure reduces load carrying capacity; so if you're loaded with gear increment up.

Don
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-25-2008, 04:35 PM
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Is there any OEM (original equipment manufacture) research to back up the lower tire presure for cold riding conditions?
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-25-2008, 05:38 PM
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Good question.

Basically, tires are designed to work in an optimum heat range. In very cold weather, it's very tough to get heat into the tires because cold pavement sucks the heat right out of tires.

Here is a link to a Sportrider article that basically says, just run what the manufacturer states. IMHO, the nugget is where the article states that lower pressures increase the heat into the tire.

SPORTRIDER ARTICLE

I think of Lawyers when I read most stuff about tires and tire pressures. As in a Lawyer was standing over the author with a red pen.

Bottom line, nobody will put in writing it's a good idea to run less than OEM-spec tire pressure. The truth may lie somewhere in that gray region.

Don
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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-25-2008, 11:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hacktracker View Post
Good question.

Basically, tires are designed to work in an optimum heat range. In very cold weather, it's very tough to get heat into the tires because cold pavement sucks the heat right out of tires.

Here is a link to a Sportrider article that basically says, just run what the manufacturer states. IMHO, the nugget is where the article states that lower pressures increase the heat into the tire.

SPORTRIDER ARTICLE

I think of Lawyers when I read most stuff about tires and tire pressures. As in a Lawyer was standing over the author with a red pen.

Bottom line, nobody will put in writing it's a good idea to run less than OEM-spec tire pressure. The truth may lie somewhere in that gray region.
Sounds good to me HT, My last out this fall I was running 32 f 36 rear the air temp was in the 50`s and I was sliding in the corners. Dropped it down to 30/32 and traction improved as the tires were no doubt warmer. ,stock rubber.
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-26-2008, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Onaroll View Post
Sounds good to me HT, My last out this fall I was running 32 f 36 rear the air temp was in the 50`s and I was sliding in the corners. Dropped it down to 30/32 and traction improved as the tires were no doubt warmer. ,stock rubber.
I would question whether you added traction was a result of more heat or a larger contact patch, or maybe a combination of both.

Yes cool air temps makes a tire take longer to heat up, but friction will get the tire up to proper temp.

We need more research. But I believe the OEM recommended pressures are recommended because they will work in a broad range of riding conditions.
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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-26-2008, 02:01 PM
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Good article, thanks for the link.
What I take from it is to run OEM recommended tire pressure and it would be a good idea to talk to the OEM about running a certain tire at a pressure other than the recommended one. “The tire manufacturers spend a lot of time determining what pressures will provide the best compromise of performance and tire wear on the street” The lower pressure heats the tire up quicker thus getting increased cornering grip” but “at the expense of stability & feel”. That’s the part that makes me nervous. “Lower pressures decrease straight-line stability, and regardless of how talented the rider is, most street bikes spend a high percentage of their time straight up”.

For myself, I’ll run the recommended tire pressures in cold weather and slow it down. I rode in 40 to 50 deg F weather the other day and the tires felt warm when I checked them.

The article also mentioned using a good gauge. I did some checking on the accuracy of some of the pencil type gauges (the kind I use) and some can be 5% or more out of hitting the nominal target. 5% of 36 is 1.8 which means you could be running at 34.2 psi or less by using a cheapo tire pressure gauge.

Think I’ll head to the auto parts store after work and make a good investment. pmac
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-26-2008, 05:52 PM
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I figure the tire manufacturers know a little bit more about tires than the motorcycle manufacturers do. On my cars, trucks and motorcycles I go by what the tire manufacturer has imprinted on the tire sidewalls.

Si vis pacem para bellum
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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-26-2008, 08:45 PM
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I figure the tire manufacturers know a little bit more about tires than the motorcycle manufacturers do. On my cars, trucks and motorcycles I go by what the tire manufacturer has imprinted on the tire sidewalls.
The info on the sidewall is the maximum pressure that tire should be inflated to.
It does not take into account the weight of the vehicle that tire is on.

A 190 rear on a GSXR1000 does not need to run at the same pressure that same tire would run on a FJR1300. Your bike manufacturer makes their recommendations based on weight, type of bike, and expected type of use.

If your tire manufacturer has a recommended pressure on their website for your bike (most do not BTW), then use that. But if they do not, then I would suggest using the bike manufacturers recommendation.
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post #16 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-27-2008, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by mudarra View Post
The info on the sidewall is the maximum pressure that tire should be inflated to.
It does not take into account the weight of the vehicle that tire is on.

A 190 rear on a GSXR1000 does not need to run at the same pressure that same tire would run on a FJR1300. Your bike manufacturer makes their recommendations based on weight, type of bike, and expected type of use.

If your tire manufacturer has a recommended pressure on their website for your bike (most do not BTW), then use that. But if they do not, then I would suggest using the bike manufacturers recommendation.
+1 on that. Be very carefull riding if you inflate to the maximum tire pressure. It sounds a little sketchy to me.

Useless factoid. The new Pirelli Diablo SuperCorsa rear race tire has a cold inflation pressure of 22 or 24 psi according to the Pirelli rep I spoke with at an AMA race. I even asked "is that trackday pace or AMA pace?" and he confirmed for a trackday.

Don
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