How to measure chain slack??? - Kawasaki Versys Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-19-2012, 08:40 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
twowheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 3,353
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Garage
How to measure chain slack???

Looking for opinions..................

I recently used method #1 to adjust my chain slack to 3.5 cm however I've been getting different options on what is the correct way. Googling various articles on the Internet there seems to be a few different opinions on what is the correct way. Even the Kawasaki service manual is slightly ambiguous on this question. It only provides a diagram that alludes to either method 1 or 2. You will get a larger measurement if you measure the distance between pulling the chain downward all the way and then pulling the chain upward compared with measuring the distance from the "at rest" position of the chain to pulling it all the way up. So which is correct?

Note we can assume a measurement is taken from the center point of the chain run where the chain is slackest and using the same edge of the chain to perform both measurements (top edge of chain on bottom run) as this is specified in the manual.

1) Do you measure chain slack from pulling the chain all the way down to pulling the chain all the way up? Yields biggest number.

2) Do you measure from the at rest position of the chain to pulling the chain all the way up?

3) Do you measure from the at rest position of the chain to pulling the chain all the way down? Yields a smaller number than #2.

4) Do you measure as in #1 but divide by 2? A few articles mention this method. Yields the smallest number.
twowheels is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-19-2012, 08:46 PM
Member
 
ROCKER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North Georgia
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
I kick it with my toe, if it doesn't hit the swingarm its good. Harhar
ROCKER is offline  
post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-19-2012, 09:00 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
twowheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 3,353
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Garage
This article in Sport Rider magazine specifies #1 but many Google results from other sources like blogs and forums specify #2. There is a considerable difference in the result you get between #1 and #2. You get a much tighter chain with #1.

http://www.sportrider.com/suspension...ent/index.html
twowheels is offline  
 
post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-19-2012, 09:58 PM
Member
 
Tuck923's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lafayette,TN
Posts: 34
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
My chain never touches the swing arm at all. I have adjusted it too tight, to the point that it made a humming sound, at around 55mph and above. That being said, I adjusted my chain to have about 1 1/4" slack, with the chain tight on either top or bottom.


Sent from my iPhone using MO Free

Current rides:
2011 Versys
1995 CR 250 (Sold)
2005 Honda Recon(Sold)
Tuck923 is offline  
post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-19-2012, 10:36 PM
Member
 
genehil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Mount Dora, FL
Posts: 1,251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
I just adjusted mine after a rear tire change last Tuesday. I referenced the maintenance manual and set my chain to 1 to 1 1/4 inch using your method #1.

GeneHil - Mount Dora, FL
2011 Kawasaki Versys
Viet Nam: Dec67-Dec68 & Jul69-Dec72
genehil is offline  
post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-19-2012, 10:59 PM
Member
 
invader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kapuskasing Ontario Canada
Posts: 7,842
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
#1. Check chain tension at its tightest position. Find tightest position by rotating rear wheel. Measure and adjust chain tension with rear suspension fully extended.
invader is offline  
post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-20-2012, 08:38 AM
Member
 
genehil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Mount Dora, FL
Posts: 1,251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
From the Service Manual:


GeneHil - Mount Dora, FL
2011 Kawasaki Versys
Viet Nam: Dec67-Dec68 & Jul69-Dec72
genehil is offline  
post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-20-2012, 01:04 PM
Super Moderator
 
fasteddiecopeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kelowna, BC - summer; Florence, AZ - winter
Posts: 17,822
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ROCKER View Post
I kick it with my toe, if it doesn't hit the swingarm its good. Harhar
That's what I do, but instead of being happy it doesn't touch the swingarm, I look for about 1/2 to 3/4" FROM the swingarm.

Then every now-and-then I'll take out a ruler and properly check the slack.

BTW - where the manual says to "kick the tire forward" when loosening a too-tight chain, I take a phillips screwdriver, put it into a rear-sprocket tooth at "6 o'clock", then GENTLY turn the rear wheel CCW till the axle's pulled forward, then tighten things up.

Ed
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


'08 V AZ, '15 V650LT BC
Ride to D2D 2013, June '13

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Ride to D2D 2015, June '15

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Ride to D2D 2016, June '16

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by fasteddiecopeman; 08-20-2012 at 01:08 PM.
fasteddiecopeman is offline  
post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-20-2012, 02:07 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Northern New Jersey
Posts: 293
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by twowheels View Post
Looking for opinions..................

I recently used method #1 to adjust my chain slack to 3.5 cm however I've been getting different options on what is the correct way. Googling various articles on the Internet there seems to be a few different opinions on what is the correct way. Even the Kawasaki service manual is slightly ambiguous on this question. It only provides a diagram that alludes to either method 1 or 2. You will get a larger measurement if you measure the distance between pulling the chain downward all the way and then pulling the chain upward compared with measuring the distance from the "at rest" position of the chain to pulling it all the way up. So which is correct?

Note we can assume a measurement is taken from the center point of the chain run where the chain is slackest and using the same edge of the chain to perform both measurements (top edge of chain on bottom run) as this is specified in the manual.

1) Do you measure chain slack from pulling the chain all the way down to pulling the chain all the way up? Yields biggest number.

2) Do you measure from the at rest position of the chain to pulling the chain all the way up?

3) Do you measure from the at rest position of the chain to pulling the chain all the way down? Yields a smaller number than #2.

4) Do you measure as in #1 but divide by 2? A few articles mention this method. Yields the smallest number.
Since no one answered you really....

Option #2 - Measure it from the rest position of the cahin to pulling the chain all the way up.

Video Below which is good.



Farkles:
Givi Tall Windscreen, Givi Top Rack and Case, Givi V35 Bags and Mounts, Givi QuickLock Tank Connector+Bag, Oxford Heated Grips, Nuvi 550 w/ Ram Mount, Barkbusters Full Wrap + Storm, Motowerks Flatfoot, Spools and Tank Protector, Bobbed Fender, Grip Puppies, 12v SAE Socket, Packjack, Airhawk 1 (med), Scala Rider G4, Contour Roam2

Next Stop: 44Tooth Sprocket (To be installed)
naudan is offline  
post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-20-2012, 05:57 PM
Member
 
genehil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Mount Dora, FL
Posts: 1,251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
What a Nancy Boy...

GeneHil - Mount Dora, FL
2011 Kawasaki Versys
Viet Nam: Dec67-Dec68 & Jul69-Dec72
genehil is offline  
post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-20-2012, 08:05 PM
Member
 
s102000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Yorkville / Rockmart Ga
Posts: 222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
The way to get an accurate measurement is to have the bike on the ground and then sit on the bike and have someone to measure the slack. Or you could leave it a little loose from spec, when weight is put on the bike the chain will tighten up to spec.

Sold 2005 honda vtx 1300 bought an '09 versys
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
s102000 is offline  
post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-20-2012, 08:12 PM
Member
 
s102000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Yorkville / Rockmart Ga
Posts: 222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ROCKER View Post
I kick it with my toe, if it doesn't hit the swingarm its good. Harhar
not good for the toe nail..

how we doin', need to make another trip up your way or should I say your hangout.

Sold 2005 honda vtx 1300 bought an '09 versys
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
s102000 is offline  
post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-20-2012, 08:39 PM
Member
 
ROCKER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North Georgia
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by s102000 View Post
not good for the toe nail..

how we doin', need to make another trip up your way or should I say your hangout.
Anytime, You'll find me at ridershill 10-11am every weekend
ROCKER is offline  
post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-20-2012, 08:39 PM
Member
 
invader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kapuskasing Ontario Canada
Posts: 7,842
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Rear suspension should be unladen and as fully extended as possible for accurate chain tension measurements under consistent conditions... Adjusting chain tension within specs with rear suspension compressed will result in excessive slack.

Last edited by invader; 08-20-2012 at 08:44 PM.
invader is offline  
post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-21-2012, 07:07 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Northern New York
Posts: 261
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
I go for the larger side of the spec. I had it too tight once and almost trashed the chain.

Too loose is better than too tight. I go for 1.4" or the 35mm.
David RSparky3 is offline  
post #16 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-21-2012, 04:52 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
twowheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 3,353
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by naudan View Post
Since no one answered you really....

Option #2 - Measure it from the rest position of the cahin to pulling the chain all the way up.

Video Below which is good.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zB4DsHV8SAQ
He uses option #1 in the video. Notice he first pulls down the chain to take all the slack out of it. I am convinced at this point option #1 is the correct way as I have found supporting articles from cycle magazines and even this video that support this.
twowheels is offline  
post #17 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-21-2012, 05:27 PM
Super Moderator
 
fasteddiecopeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kelowna, BC - summer; Florence, AZ - winter
Posts: 17,822
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by s102000 View Post
The way to get an accurate measurement is to have the bike on the ground and then sit on the bike and have someone to measure the slack. Or you could leave it a little loose from spec, when weight is put on the bike the chain will tighten up to spec.
Respectfully... the ONLY way that chain-slack will be affected by someone sitting on the bike, is IF your frame had all the strength, and stiffness of spaghetti.

IF you want to know EXACTLY what the slack should be, determine a method to get the center-lines of the front sprocket, rear sprocket and swing-arm pivot DIRECTLY IN LINE, as this is the point at which the chain will be at its TIGHTEST. (Can be done by supporting the bike, removing the rear shock, then lifting the rear till all three line up.) THEN adjust the chain till it has just a LITTLE slack; put the shock back into it; put the bike back onto its wheels and MEASURE how much slack there is.

Or, just read your manual for the numbers that Ma Kawasaki came up with when THEY did it at the factory.

Ed
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


'08 V AZ, '15 V650LT BC
Ride to D2D 2013, June '13

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Ride to D2D 2015, June '15

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Ride to D2D 2016, June '16

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
fasteddiecopeman is offline  
post #18 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-21-2012, 05:42 PM
Member
 
Time's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 1,647
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
What you'er doing by sitting on the bike is trying to get the swing are to swing through it's ark of travel so as to have the longed extention you can get. Some dirt bikes can see a 2" change of tension on the chain in a full travel.I can't see a Versys having more than an inch if that.

I don't get out a Mic of caliper I just eye ball it to have about 1" of slack.with the bikes of the kickstand and go with that. Yea it's probibly loose BUT that's much better that tight, too tight wears chain sest out and counter shaft bearing and counter shafts as well. As long as the chain's not slaping the swing arm or trying to "skip" teeth on the sprocket I'm happy. I got close to 20,000 miles on my KLR and would have gotten more BUT a big rock in WV bent the rear sprocket so badly I had to beat it with another rock to keep the chain on long enough to make a shop and replace both the sprockets and chain.

Or was that look THEN leap?
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


2012 650 Versys
Time is offline  
post #19 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-23-2012, 12:23 AM
Member
 
Mursili's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Los Alamos, NM
Posts: 642
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by fasteddiecopeman View Post
Or, just read your manual for the numbers that Ma Kawasaki came up with when THEY did it at the factory.
And yet doing this simple thing is difficult for so many. Think break-in, oil change interval, etc.

When it comes to havoc, no one wreaks like me! - Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz

I will never be good and that's not bad. - Ban-Anon
Mursili is offline  
post #20 of 21 (permalink) Old 09-13-2012, 06:25 PM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Bochum, Germany
Posts: 378
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
The top should be ~one finger above the swing arm, when on the side stand.

Too much tension is much more common and hurtful than too little.

2008 Kawasaki Versys
1994 Honda NTV 650
1999 Suzuki AN125
blahwas is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Kawasaki Versys Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome