Interesting article on tire wear - Kawasaki Versys Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-27-2012, 09:54 AM Thread Starter
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Interesting article on tire wear

Was educating myself on normal tire wear when I came across this article:

http://www.rattlebars.com/tirewear/index.html

Most of it made some sense to me. Interesting point on the article was the authors opinion on engine braking. I took my Basic Rider Course almost a year ago. Engine braking was taught not only for normal braking but for emergency braking as well. I am scheduled for an experienced rider course next week. I will report what is taught there.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-27-2012, 01:41 PM
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Yeah, that piece brings up some interesting points! Well supported by the pics as well. Thanks for posting it up.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-27-2012, 03:55 PM
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Good read, cheers.
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-27-2012, 05:50 PM
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Good read thanks for posting.

"Engine braking is the exercise of downshifting and releasing the clutch through all the gears when coming to a stop. On most modern bikes equipped with disc brakes this old timer's use of the engine to aid in braking is totally unnecessary. Doing so will loose you thousands of serviceable miles on your rear tire, will double the stress on your drive train and could cause your rear wheel to lock (even on a bike with ABS) causing a crash. When coming to a normal stop (red light etc) downshifting commensurate with your speed is still essential to bike safety (in case you need to power out of a jam), but releasing the clutch when doing so is not necessary and adds greatly rear tire flat band center wear. Keep that clutch pulled."


Just my 2cents, but I have to at least partly agree with this, especially when it comes to emergency braking. The use of slipper clutches in GP racing would also tend to support this argument. At least from my own experience I can modulate the braking force applied to the rear wheel much better with the rear disk than I can with the throttle, clutch and transmission. Yeah it's important to be in the right gear so you can power away when necessary but you don't have to release the clutch between each downshift to do this, you can downshift with the clutch pulled and simultaneously be applying optimum braking force at both wheels and still be ready for instant acceleration in the right gear just by releasing the clutch. Releasing the clutch for each downshift, especially when coming to a complete stop is IMO just wasted effort and focus and will make the rear that much more likely to lock up if you are already hard on the rear brake.

1) you can apply more braking force with the rear brake than you can with the throttle alone.
2) You can also apply enough force with the rear brake to make engine braking irrelevant
3) under panic braking, downshifting and throttle control take away from your focus on trying to stop while not locking up the wheels and/or swerving to avoid the object of your emergency braking unless you are a pro level rider

Last edited by twowheels; 01-27-2012 at 07:10 PM.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-27-2012, 11:45 PM
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Interesting read. Thanks for posting the link.

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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-28-2012, 12:21 AM
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-28-2012, 12:32 AM
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-28-2012, 10:12 AM
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I've got over 10K km/6K miles on my Michelin RP2's with some hard riding and they still have plenty of deep tread left. They are the best wearing tires I've ever mounted. The dual compound causes the tire to wear evenly.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-28-2012, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twowheels View Post
Good read thanks for posting.

Yeah it's important to be in the right gear so you can power away when necessary but you don't have to release the clutch between each downshift to do this, you can downshift with the clutch pulled .
This is what I was talking about in my Sticky Shifter post. Discussing it with a friend of mine I think I had gotten slow and behind with my downshifting so when I was almost stopped it would not shift anymore unless I released the clutch to engage the gears.

Still all rider error! I will be more proactive in the future.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-28-2012, 06:57 PM
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I have to admit I prefer to use eng braking while "emergency" stoping. Down shifting and modulating the rear brake is too much to think about at once when dancing on the edge of traction. Since one has to down shift anyway, I prefer to have the eng brake the rear tire. During emergencies the rear tire is barely on the ground and the eng brakeing is barely less than what the tire can handle anyway.

Saying that. During normal riding I prefer to use the rear brake as it give much more braking power than the eng ever could. And it settles the suspension better. The slower the speed the more I use the rear brake. On the race track I use front only, in a parking lot I use rear only.
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post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-12-2012, 04:08 AM
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I have ABS in my Versys, and with that you can ignore the rear brake for panic braking.

For "racing braking" while downshifting, like before a tight corner, the rear brakes are even harmful with ABS: The rear tire will lock up while closing the clutch after downshifting when you're using the rear and front brake at the same time. And since it has ABS, it will open the brakes a bit. Sadly, it will open both brakes, as the ABS controller probably considers this situation a stoppie and wants to prevent that. Thus, you loose a few precious meters, and you get really large eyes.

Even with non-ABS bikes of this kind of geometry (Versys), I'd suggest to ignore the rear brake, and brake as hard as possible in the front in emergencies. If you brake just a bit softer for the first 0,1sec or so (until the fork has compressed), you can brake really hard without locking up the front tire (unless you ride OEM D205 tires, on mud, etc.).

And don't forget to look for escape routes, sometimes braking to a standstill isn't the best option.

My Michelin Pilot Road 2 lasted 7000 km, but I really did not treat them kindly wih all that twisty road in racing mode. Front and rear tire were both at 1,6mm, which is the legal limit in Germany. Trying BT023 now.

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