Sticky Shifter - Kawasaki Versys Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-21-2012, 10:12 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Tampa, Fl
Posts: 156
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Sticky Shifter

I have had an issue lately with down shifting. As I come to a stop, occasionally, but happening more and more, I can not work my way down the gears because the shifter fails to reset unless I release the clutch a little. I intially thought I had not allowed the shifter to spring back up to reset, but I have since ensured this is not the case. Is this a matter of needing to lube the shifter, or is this caused by something else? I ride a 2011 V I bought brand new in September.
jagrugger is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-21-2012, 11:40 AM
Member
 
invader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kapuskasing Ontario Canada
Posts: 7,827
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
It might need lubing. Left footpeg has to be removed from mounting plate to properly clean and grease the shifter lever's sealed main pivot. You can also grease the two small rod-end links.
Squirting some chain lube on the main link sides may help for now as a quick fix.

Last edited by invader; 01-21-2012 at 11:45 AM.
invader is offline  
post #3 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 03:47 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Tampa, Fl
Posts: 156
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
I was paying a little more attention to this, and it seems that when this happens and I have to release the clutch I can feel it catch or engage in the transmission. Shouldn't the gears engage upon depressing the shifter. I am wondering if I need to adjust the clutch?
jagrugger is offline  
 
post #4 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 03:56 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 687
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
If you are having trouble going from 6th to 1st, for example, without letting the clutch out between shifts, then I know what you are talking about. Letting the clutch out with each downshift is the way to go. What (I think) you are describing is normal for a motorcycle transmission - at least on any motorcycle I've ridden.
Mt. Versuvius is offline  
post #5 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 04:15 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Tampa, Fl
Posts: 156
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
I am a new rider so maybe I am doing it wrong, but what I usually do is coast down to a stop. Usually I engage the clutch and down shift as I slow down but not releasing the clutch in between gears. Usually it catches, but occasionally it gets stuck in one gear until I relase the clutch. If i don't need the gear (for instance the light is still red so I keep coasting) and I have slowed even more I down shift again. Obviously as I am coasting down and down shifting IF a quicker stop is needed I will engage the clutch to engine brake and shorten the stopping distance. As far as I knew you should be able to shift through the gear range with out releasing the clutch. I even tried pushing up on the lever to reset it but it did not work.
jagrugger is offline  
post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 04:35 PM
Member
 
Capn Kirk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Virginia USA
Posts: 4,740
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
I always downshift and use engine braking with every gear except maybe 2nd & 1st sometimes.

Every MC I have ridden or owned does not like to be cruising in 5th or 6th, pull in the clutch and stop with brakes only and then just click down the shifter back to 1st. Sometimes you can get away with it, but usually have to release the clutch some on the way down.

I believe this is more about operator than equipment.

Capn Kirk is offline  
post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 06:14 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Tampa, Fl
Posts: 156
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Still researching this, maybe my riding habits need a tweak.
jagrugger is offline  
post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 07:16 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Tampa, Fl
Posts: 156
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Well I will be tweaking my shifting habits, but there is no way you can shift accoriding to the parameters set in the owners manual!!
jagrugger is offline  
post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 07:26 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Tampa, Fl
Posts: 156
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Oh and thanks for the help!!
jagrugger is offline  
post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 07:38 PM
Member
 
invader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kapuskasing Ontario Canada
Posts: 7,827
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
How's your clutch cable slack? You can also adjust lever distance from the bar with the numbered wheel. Have you lubed your clutch cable, and is your normal idle set to 1300 rpm? Proper drive chain slack also makes a difference. How old is your oil? Synthetic JASO MA oil helps as well.
invader is offline  
post #11 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 07:47 PM
Member
 
Capn Kirk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Virginia USA
Posts: 4,740
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jagrugger View Post
Well I will be tweaking my shifting habits, but there is no way you can shift accoriding to the parameters set in the owners manual!!
I could not tell you what the manual says. I shift up and down based on sound & feel and my goals for the moment. She will let you know if your not doing something right! Be careful as you are learning the downshift as the Versys can bark the rear tire if you pop the clutch downshifting too fast without giving enough throttle.
Capn Kirk is offline  
post #12 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 07:47 PM
Super Moderator
 
Fastoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Ipoh.Perak.Malaysia
Posts: 6,757
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Down shifting while in motion is better than shifting through the gears when you are stationary. Try shifting when in motion and this will let the engine brake before coming to a standstill and by this time you will be in 2nd and shifting down to 1st should not be a problem.

If you are in 6th when stationary, then shifting all the way down to 1st, you will need to release the clutch a little.

Keep all joints and links oiled will help smooth shifting too.

You problem seem to more on riding habit.

Fastoman is offline  
post #13 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 08:53 PM
Super Moderator
 
Bear on a bicycle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Converse, Tx
Posts: 4,695
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by invader View Post
How's your clutch cable slack? You can also adjust lever distance from the bar with the numbered wheel. Have you lubed your clutch cable, and is your normal idle set to 1300 rpm? Proper drive chain slack also makes a difference. How old is your oil? Synthetic JASO MA oil helps as well.

I was thinking clutch cable slack as well. Easy to overlook, and easy to adjust.






Bear on a bicycle is offline  
post #14 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 08:53 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Tampa, Fl
Posts: 156
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by invader View Post
How's your clutch cable slack? You can also adjust lever distance from the bar with the numbered wheel. Have you lubed your clutch cable, and is your normal idle set to 1300 rpm? Proper drive chain slack also makes a difference. How old is your oil? Synthetic JASO MA oil helps as well.
The slack looked good. I have not lubed it and it might be a good idea to do so anyway, its been smooth but preventative measures are the best. Idle is good, as well as the chain slack. The oil is fairly new as I just changed it just over 3000 miles, i am almost at 4000 now. I have been holding off on switching to synthetic for a little bit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capn Kirk View Post
I could not tell you what the manual says. I shift up and down based on sound & feel and my goals for the moment. She will let you know if your not doing something right! Be careful as you are learning the downshift as the Versys can bark the rear tire if you pop the clutch downshifting too fast without giving enough throttle.
Yeah came across their shifting table researching this. I don't think shifting to 6 gear at 34 mph would work out well

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastoman View Post
Down shifting while in motion is better than shifting through the gears when you are stationary. Try shifting when in motion and this will let the engine brake before coming to a standstill and by this time you will be in 2nd and shifting down to 1st should not be a problem.

If you are in 6th when stationary, then shifting all the way down to 1st, you will need to release the clutch a little.

Keep all joints and links oiled will help smooth shifting too.

You problem seem to more on riding habit.

Yup was talking with a friend and did remember it seemed to happen more when I was slower. So and adjustment to my riding habit will commence tomorrow.
jagrugger is offline  
post #15 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-25-2012, 09:06 PM
Member
 
invader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kapuskasing Ontario Canada
Posts: 7,827
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
There should also be 2-3 mm of throttle grip free play for better control. Lubing throttle tube and cables can help too... You can easily pull the mid-cable adjuster that runs over the engine, adjust it then check with cable back up in its natural position. Shown here with locknut loosened and backed up to the right:


Last edited by invader; 01-25-2012 at 09:09 PM.
invader is offline  
post #16 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-26-2012, 01:25 AM
Member
 
pizellu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Mgarr, Malta
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Downshift

Hi Jagrugger,
You should always downshift while in motion, 1 so as to use the engine brakes as much as possible, and 2 when you are stopped you won't need to fiddle with gears to shift to 1st cause you'd already be in 1st.....If you'd live in a country like i do where the tarmac is like polished cement you would never rely only on the brakes cause it's too slippery.

Practise this as much as possible especially if your bike has not got ABS.
Apart from that all the bikes I owned won't shift from top gear to 1st when stopped.
pizellu is offline  
post #17 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-26-2012, 04:33 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 687
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
"Research has shown" that the quickest way to stop a motorcycle is with the clutch in and only using the brakes, and even then, mainly the front brake. But in normal circumstances you're not looking for the quickest way to stop but the smoothest and safest. Keeping the bike in the proper gear relative to road speed, using some engine braking, is the safest technique. It gives you more options for accident avoidance if you need to get back on the throttle in a hurry.
Mt. Versuvius is offline  
post #18 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-26-2012, 08:59 AM
Member
 
blipco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: boston, MA
Posts: 1,515
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mt. Versuvius View Post
"Research has shown" that the quickest way to stop a motorcycle is with the clutch in and only using the brakes, and even then, mainly the front brake. But in normal circumstances you're not looking for the quickest way to stop but the smoothest and safest. Keeping the bike in the proper gear relative to road speed, using some engine braking, is the safest technique. It gives you more options for accident avoidance if you need to get back on the throttle in a hurry.
+1. The rear brake stops the bike with more control and stronger than any engine. Less wear on the engine as well. Engine braking can also be unpredictable. Front brakes do the most effective braking.
blipco is offline  
post #19 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-26-2012, 04:00 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 687
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by blipco View Post
+1. The rear brake stops the bike with more control and stronger than any engine. Less wear on the engine as well. Engine braking can also be unpredictable. Front brakes do the most effective braking.
blipco, I actually was advocating the use of engine braking, except in an emergency stop situation. It resolves the issue the OP raised, as well as putting you in the correct gear in case of trouble.
Mt. Versuvius is offline  
post #20 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-26-2012, 04:11 PM
Member
 
Capn Kirk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Virginia USA
Posts: 4,740
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by blipco View Post
+1. The rear brake stops the bike with more control and stronger than any engine. Less wear on the engine as well. Engine braking can also be unpredictable. Front brakes do the most effective braking.
The OP is talking about everyday riding, not emergency braking. Every single rider I know uses engine braking during decel. I am not concerned with added wear to the engine. I would think without engine braking, one would wear the brake pads a rotors much faster.

Side note: I ride with one lady who uses only her rear brake! We have discussed this and I see that she always rides in front of me. I hope one day she does not need the full potential of both brakes in an emergency.
Capn Kirk is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Kawasaki Versys Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome