2015 power outlet install - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 94 (permalink) Old 11-19-2011, 04:20 PM Thread Starter
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Pretty much any 20A automotive relay connected to the battery via a 20A fuse and a a cheap terminal block of your choosing will provide the required functionality and provide switched power (cuts off when engine is turned off). Total cost ~$10.


Note all automotive relays have the same pin numberings marked on them.

Pin 30 - connects to pos battery terminal via 20A or less fuse (high current)
Pin 87 - switched distribution power source (high current) - to terminal block
Pin 85 - relay trigger ground (low current)
Pin 86 - relay trigger positive - wire to any switched 12v source like running lights that are only on with engine running (low current)


Suggest using 12 gauge wire for high current wires (it is good for up to 40A) which is more than will ever be needed. Any thin wire wire can be used to trigger the relay. Also solder rather than just twist all connections and wrap with electrical tape. When soldering heat the wires to be soldered until solder touching the wires (and not the soldering iron) melts into the wires. Installing a 20A fuse between battery and relay is a good idea. Twisted wire connections tend to be a source of power loss and possible failure point.
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post #2 of 94 (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 12:03 AM Thread Starter
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2015 power outlet install

I wrote the following article for another site and thought I would double post here for anyone interested.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++
Why a relay?

Each pre existing circuit in your bike is fused. If you install a power hungry accessory like heated grips or tank mounted espresso maker it will start blowing fuses if connected to an existing circuit such as the head light circuit and if you up the fuse the original device is no longer protected.

With a high current accessory like heated grips they need to be powered directly from the battery on their own fused circuit. The only issue with a direct battery connection is the connected devices always have power so can run down the battery if left on. A switched power source that is only active when the engine is running is more desirable. This is where a relay comes in. A relay will allow you to take the power draw off the battery where it should be but only be active when the relay is turned on by the ignition.

Several bike accessory sources like Twisted Throttle sell a pre packaged bike accessory relay block for wiring in accessories for about $80. It does the exact same thing as the ~$10 circuit you can build yourself from an automotive relay.


How to build a relay controlled circuit

A relay is basically an electrically operated switch. Buy a generic 4 pin automotive relay. They're cheap and available at most auto parts stores. The switch circuit is very low power, while the switched circuit can handle high current flow. Energize the coil side of the relay from a source that is only on when the engine is running. For example pin 85 to Ground and pin 86 to the tail running light. Power the relay from the POS terminal of the battery (pin 30) via a fuse in an installed inline fuse holder of suitable capacity. You now have a high current power source, that is only energized when the ignition is ON, from pin 87. Optionally you can connect pin 87 to a wiring block to provide more than one connection point if you have multiple accessories.

Note some automotive relays will have five pins with the additional pin labeled 87a. The extra pin functions the same as pin 87 with the exception that it supplies power when the relay is not energized and switches off when the relay is energized, the opposite of pin 87. If you use a relay of this type remember to insulate the unused pin so it does not short out on the frame.


How to make a reliable electrical connection


There are several ways to connect wires together but several of them are problematic and the source of reliability issues. In particular tap connectors that punch through the insulation to tap into a connector are unreliable and should be avoided if possible. The best way to join wires is with solder. Twisting wires together creates another source of potential electrical problems.

To create a good solder joint twist the wires together as a first step. Next heat the twisted wires from the bottom (heat rises) with a hot soldering iron for a minute or two. If you hold the solder against the heating wires (from the top) it should melt into the wires when they get hot enough. Let the solder melt into the hot wires rather than melting the solder directly with the soldering iron. Remember to pre heat the soldering iron for 5 minutes or so before using - they don't heat up instantly.

A clean soldering iron tip will transfer heat much more effectively and just work better. Keep the tip of the soldering iron clean when it is hot, by brushing against a damp sponge or cloth, usually after every solder. Emery paper can be used to sand oxidation off a cold soldering iron tip that has not been used in a while. A clean tip will have a shinny coating of solder. If it is dull it needs cleaning.

A wire stripper like that pictured to the right is cheap (~$5-10) to purchase at a specialty electronics store like The Source and the best choice for removing insulation A dedicated wire stripper makes it easy and quick to remove insulation from wires with a high degree of precision. Knives, razor blades and in particular pliers like wire strippers perform poorly and often cut a portion of the wire as well as the insulation.

An electrical connection can be insulated with either electrical tape or a heat gun and shrink wrap. Do not use duct tape, scotch tape or other kinds of tape as the insulation properties and/or adhesive durability are can often be poor.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg relay2.jpg (2.4 KB, 99 views)
File Type: jpg relay1.jpg (6.2 KB, 220 views)
File Type: jpg good_type_of_wire_stripper.jpg (4.5 KB, 97 views)
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post #3 of 94 (permalink) Old 01-07-2013, 12:46 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclesarge View Post
I have a question about those fuse blocks they sell from Twistedthrottle (as well as others). It looks like they only have one relay. Wouldn't separate devices require separate relays?

I recently connected my heated grips and had planned on running some driving lights off the same relay. Then I started thinking about how I'd turn them off.

Nice write up, BTW.
Only one relay is needed for all your accessories but I would connect a fuse between pin 87 and each accessory. Most accessories like heated grips come with in line fuses anyway. Optionally you can buy a cheap terminal block to provide extra connection points to pin 87 of the relay or just connect the wires together at pin 87. Suggest 12guage wire.
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post #4 of 94 (permalink) Old 01-09-2013, 10:29 PM Thread Starter
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From the responses here I am not sure everyone understands the purpose of a relay in this context. It exists to supply a common switched source of high current that is ONLY active while the engine is running or the key is ON - depending what you activate the relay from. Kinda like the main switch on the fuse panel of your house that shuts the power on/off to all of your house. Relays are not normally used for individual control of items on a motorcycle, except for the starter motor.

The switched power source keeps items that will still suck small amounts of current when turned off (eg. electronic heat controllers) from draining the battery. It also keeps items that the rider forgets to switch off from draining the battery.

Each item still has it's own individual fuse, switch or controller (optional) and wiring as it would normally have. The POS wire just gets connected to pin 87 of the relay instead of directly to the POS terminal of the batter.

As for wire gauge size this has nothing to do with relays or switches but is dependent entirely on the current flow. See the chart.

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post #5 of 94 (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 06:03 PM
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Arrow 2015 power outlet install

This is my small write up of the 2015 Versys 650 power Outlet install

This could also be used for a usb style outlet as well


Items I used
1. OEM kawasaki power relay Item# 99994-0556
http://www.kawasaki.com/Accessories/...0FFF/999940556

2. Trackside 12 Volt Power Adapter from Cycle gear on-sale $12.99
http://www.cyclegear.com/TRACKSIDE-1...-Power-Adapter

3. 1 male Bullet connector and 1 female Bullet connector

4. 3m Black electrical Tape

5. Zip ties

6. Instructions for power outlet

http://www.kawasaki.com/Content/Uplo..._999940485.pdf

7. Instructions for Relay kit

http://www.kawasaki.com/Content/Uplo..._999940556.pdf




This Is a rough idea of what I did.

1 I down loaded the instructions for the Relay kit here

http://www.kawasaki.com/Content/Uplo..._999940556.pdf

2 I down loaded the Factory acceries

http://www.kawasaki.com/Content/Uplo..._999940485.pdf

I read them determined that I need to access the upper front of the motorcycle under the wind screen This is where the wiring connectors are located
the instructions tell you to refer to the shop manual. I don't have one, so I took my time looking at the bike carefully and using my cell phone camara too look up into the fairing.

3 To get to the wiring you need to remove the wind screen and the plastic panel below it.

4 Windscreen it easy just unscrew the 2 adjustment nobs completely. careful not to loose the steel washers.

5 To remove the cover you will need to remove allen screws and 2 push pins

Push pin


6 The allen wrench needed is 4mm take the 2 screws out of the front of panel careful not to loose the nylon washers.

PHOTOS TO FOLLOW


7 Remove 2 push pins on top of plastic cowling. To remove these push the center down lightly the will recess slightly then you will be able to lift them out.


Pictures to follow of push pin Location

I use a small Nail remover which works good for removing panel fasteners

Here is a picture of one similar to the one I use



8. To remove the panel
Lightly grab the front of the cover. There are two small openings in the front. With a downward and forward pull, the cover will slide off.
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post #6 of 94 (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 06:03 PM
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remove wind shield to access this panel to remov e it


then remove 2 bolts and 2 push pins



then grab these two holes and pull foward


relay location and wires to connect to it
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post #7 of 94 (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 06:04 PM
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3 save


Wiring location for relay and power outlet


Tape removed from electrical connector and relay being ready to install, At the tip of my index finger is where the relay will hang.


Relay in location
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post #8 of 94 (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 06:05 PM
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After relay is installed
Time to remove plug in dash
Its held in place on the back side with a metal bracket and screw
Remove screw with short Philips screw driver. and bracket will fall off when screw is removed and plug will remove easily now

I used a cycle gear power outlet
which is held in place by a screw on retaining collar
unscrew collar slide it off of power outlet and wires

insert power outlet "(wires first) though hole in dash

the reinstall screw on collar over wires , under dash and tighten firmly
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post #9 of 94 (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 06:05 PM
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I had to install electrical connectors on the power outlet to match the factory wires
One female bullet connector and one female bullet connector


install the male connector on the red positive wire

and install the female connector on the black wire


Plug the red positive wire together with the white with red strip wire

plug the black wire together with the black wire with white strip.

here is the picture of the wires together


I taped up all connections separately then taped all the wires together
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post #10 of 94 (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 06:53 PM
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Now reinstall all panels back together in reverse order
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post #11 of 94 (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 06:54 PM
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Installed power outlet

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post #12 of 94 (permalink) Old 05-12-2015, 02:41 AM
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Install finished
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post #13 of 94 (permalink) Old 05-12-2015, 03:25 AM
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Nicely done
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post #14 of 94 (permalink) Old 05-18-2015, 06:12 PM
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Thank you for the post, I installed the OEM kawasaki dc power outlet and used your guide for help. Really easy and thank you for taking the time to take pictures.
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post #15 of 94 (permalink) Old 06-27-2015, 06:13 PM
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Thanks Motojunkee!! I picked up the parts you mentioned and followed your instructions. You made this install super simple on my Versys. ?
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post #16 of 94 (permalink) Old 06-27-2015, 07:07 PM
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Good stuff!
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post #17 of 94 (permalink) Old 06-28-2015, 01:55 AM
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no problem glad it could help
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post #18 of 94 (permalink) Old 09-11-2015, 08:35 AM
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Nice write up!

Do you have to use the relay that Kawasaki sells? Or is it just a regular relay that can be bought anywhere just over priced because its a genuine Kawasaki accessory.

2015 White Versys 650 LT
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post #19 of 94 (permalink) Old 09-11-2015, 01:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brlee View Post
Nice write up!

Do you have to use the relay that Kawasaki sells? Or is it just a regular relay that can be bought anywhere just over priced because its a genuine Kawasaki accessory.
The NICE thing about the Kawi "relay kit" is that it plugs in, and powers-up FOUR different places. I paid $16.99 Cdn for mine, and it was EASILY worth that NOT having to 'gerry-rig' something to save $2....


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post #20 of 94 (permalink) Old 09-11-2015, 01:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fasteddiecopeman View Post
The NICE thing about the Kawi "relay kit" is that it plugs in, and powers-up FOUR different places. I paid $16.99 Cdn for mine, and it was EASILY worth that NOT having to 'gerry-rig' something to save $2....

yea sometimes I can be a penny pincher but okay def sounds worth it! thanks

2015 White Versys 650 LT
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