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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-15-2009, 09:40 AM Thread Starter
 
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Cool Versys Speed

Hello everyone I own a 2008 versys with 7,000 miles on it. I am probably not your "normal" rider in that I almost always open my throttle all the way. So my question is am I doing any harm to it by taking it very close to red line before shifting or letting it scream back down as I enter a turn and than lay on it as I come out? And running it at its top speed "115" for just about 3 minutes maybe less? I use full synthetic oil ever scene I could. Also would I do any harm by installing a power commander on it? Thanks in advance guys.

Last edited by speedversys; 06-15-2009 at 09:49 AM.
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-15-2009, 10:32 AM
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I have about 6000 track miles on my Suzuki and it has spent most of those miles between 8,000 rpm and redline. I never beat on a cold engine, but once everything is nice and warm, go ahead and put the stones to it.

I go on Friday rides with guys who all have much faster bikes and seem to use low gears and lots of revs to keep up.

As long as you install the PC correctly and you have an appropriate map, you won't do any damage. Do you have any engine mods?

Don
"ride more, worry less"
2005 Suzuki GSXR1000 (slightly bent) - Track
2000 Honda VFR800 - Street
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-15-2009, 10:35 AM Thread Starter
 
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No no engine mods and not looking to change the exhaust I like how it sounds and look, from what I have seen all the after market ones look hokey IMO. But I may put in a K and N air filter. Now I though that the PC was just a plug and play thing am I wrong about that?
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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-15-2009, 10:59 AM
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Sorta. You install the PC in the trunk area. Then it has one connection to the battery (for power), 2 for each fuel injector (one goes to the injector the other to the wiring harness), and 1 for the TPS (throttle position sensor).

The TPS has a vampire style crimping end (although you can solder it).

Once installed, you have to set the TPS adjustment. It's best to plug in a 9V battery and do it without having the engine run because you set idle and WOT.

Assuming the base map is fine, you're done.

You'll probably notice smoother operation and better response, especially in the lower RPM ranges.

Hope that helps.

Don
"ride more, worry less"
2005 Suzuki GSXR1000 (slightly bent) - Track
2000 Honda VFR800 - Street
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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-15-2009, 11:22 AM Thread Starter
 
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It dose I though it was just a plug and play oh well I still want it. Should I see a higher power band and higher speeds as well? Also I do not understand what you are saying to do with the 9volt battery.

Last edited by speedversys; 06-15-2009 at 11:42 AM.
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-15-2009, 12:55 PM
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As far as the 9V battery, the PC has to have power to set the 0 and 100 % throttle openings. If the engine is running, you can set the 0% at idle. However, if the engine is running, it will be screaming while you set the 100% setting. Therefore, in order to have power to the PC AND perform this calibration w/o the engine running, the PC needs the power from a 9V battery ONLY during this short calibration process. It doesn't stay connected.

You might see some gains at the top of the powerband. Most bikes run rich at high revs as a safety measure. Since the PC can take fuel away (negative values on a PC map) you can lean out the mixture on top to get a few more horsepower. I'm guessing maybe 2 or 3. Without a free-flowing exhaust AND intake, you'll still have the same bottleneck. The biggest gains will be in the low to mid-range where the stock fuel curve is lean.

Don
"ride more, worry less"
2005 Suzuki GSXR1000 (slightly bent) - Track
2000 Honda VFR800 - Street
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