Labor cost for sprockets and chain replacement - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 07:59 AM Thread Starter
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Labor cost for sprockets and chain replacement

I am planning to replace sprockets, chain and wheel bearing in both wheels. A Kawasaki dealership quoted me at $400 plus tax. I have never taken my bike to a shop but I feel like it's overpriced.
I wonder how much it would normally cost from your experience.
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 08:19 AM
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Wheel bearings? How many miles do you have on the bike?
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 09:03 AM
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Honestly if you have a stand it's an easy DIY maintenance job. $400 is overpriced.
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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 10:25 AM
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Changing the chain and sprockets is a straight forward easy project. You will need to purchase a chain break and rivet tool ( these can be found at a very reasonable price). The only problem you may encounter is removing the front sprocket nut, which is torqued down way too tight. If you will search the threads on this forumn there are several ways to do this with no problem. Many have used an electric impact wrench. others have locked the sprocket with a socket and broken the nut loose using a breaker bar. Kawasaki Versys Forum - Search Results for front sprocket nut removal

Wheel bearing change? Has anyone here ever had their wheel bearings changed? I've never had wheel bearings changed on my bikes. My harley softail has over 90,000 miles on it and it still has the original bearings. I personally don't know of any one that has ever had their wheel bearings changed. Well except in the old days when the wheels used cone bearings. Modern bikes use roller bearings. I believe they should last the life of your bike. If I'm wrong, I'm sure someone will correct me. Save the $400 for other things. I believe a bike rider should get to know their bike. And a chain & sprocket change would be a good place to start.
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 10:33 AM
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Taking off the front sprocket is a total bitch! Would not recommend doing that yourself the first time haha. Make sure the dealer torques it to the factory spec, not 1200 ft-lb's like Kawi did.
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 11:02 AM
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My dealer charges $98 an hour shop time. Not sure how long the job would take, then add the cost of parts.

Not everyone wants to DIY jobs they're not comfortable with.
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 11:04 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Skypilot 69 View Post
Changing the chain and sprockets is a straight forward easy project. You will need to purchase a chain break and rivet tool ( these can be found at a very reasonable price). The only problem you may encounter is removing the front sprocket nut, which is torqued down way too tight. If you will search the threads on this forumn there are several ways to do this with no problem. Many have used an electric impact wrench. others have locked the sprocket with a socket and broken the nut loose using a breaker bar. Kawasaki Versys Forum - Search Results for front sprocket nut removal

Wheel bearing change? Has anyone here ever had their wheel bearings changed? I've never had wheel bearings changed on my bikes. My harley softail has over 90,000 miles on it and it still has the original bearings. I personally don't know of any one that has ever had their wheel bearings changed. Well except in the old days when the wheels used cone bearings. Modern bikes use roller bearings. I believe they should last the life of your bike. If I'm wrong, I'm sure someone will correct me. Save the $400 for other things. I believe a bike rider should get to know their bike. And a chain & sprocket change would be a good place to start.
the reason I am changing wheel bearing is because I live in NY and ride all year round... even in single digits temperatures. What happens is the salt from the road gets to the bearings and "eats" the metal. Same happened to my chain and sprockets, the salt got inside the O-rings and damaged them. I perform all maintenance myself, and its the first time I am taking the bike to a dealer... The problem is once again the weather. I dont have a garage and servicing the bike in this cold is not worth the $400.
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 11:06 AM
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doing it yourself is really not that hard.. really the hardest part like others have said is removing the front sprocket nut, and easy way around this is to go to a tire place and ask them to bust it free for you (offer them like $20) other then that everything else can be done with simple hand tools, if you by chance live near me in Oregon your welcome to bring it by my place and ill help you with it and my rates are far cheaper then any shop lol
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 12:08 PM
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After reading your post that you live in NY and ride thru winter, w/out a garage - I understand your request, but I can tell you that a fellow who used to be on this Forum bought a Versys ('09) that had ONLY been serviced by a dealer, including VERY RECENT replacement of the two sprockets. When Dave got into it, he found that DESPITE charging for new sprockets, that dealer had NOT changed the front one. The teeth were just "nubs"....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skypilot 69 View Post
...Wheel bearing change? Has anyone here ever had their wheel bearings changed? I've never had wheel bearings changed on my bikes. My harley softail has over 90,000 miles on it and it still has the original bearings. I personally don't know of any one that has ever had their wheel bearings changed. Well except in the old days when the wheels used cone bearings. Modern bikes use roller bearings. I believe they should last the life of your bike. If I'm wrong, I'm sure someone will correct me. Save the $400 for other things. I believe a bike rider should get to know their bike. And a chain & sprocket change would be a good place to start.
For those w/ a garage - I ALWAYS grease the bearings (and axles) in my wheels whenever they are off the bike.

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Originally Posted by Urbanengineer View Post
Taking off the front sprocket is a total bitch! Would not recommend doing that yourself the first time haha. Make sure the dealer torques it to the factory spec, not 1200 ft-lb's like Kawi did.
Of the THREE V 650s I have (or HAD), two of the sprockets were EASY w/ my 1/2" air-impact guns (Craftsman in AZ, and Ingersol-Rand in BC), but I found that it works BEST if you do it just after your compressor has re-filled itself, so it's at FULL PRESSURE.

The other one...? I rode it to a local shop where they loosened it for 12 beer (local, craft beer - YUMMY!), then I re-torqued it there, rode it home and easily removed it.

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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 12:38 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by fasteddiecopeman View Post
After reading your post that you live in NY and ride thru winter, w/out a garage - I understand your request, but I can tell you that a fellow who used to be on this Forum bought a Versys ('09) that had ONLY been serviced by a dealer, including VERY RECENT replacement of the two sprockets. When Dave got into it, he found that DESPITE charging for new sprockets, that dealer had NOT changed the front one. The teeth were just "nubs"....



For those w/ a garage - I ALWAYS grease the bearings (and axles) in my wheels whenever they are off the bike.



Of the THREE V 650s I have (or HAD), two of the sprockets were EASY w/ my 1/2" air-impact guns (Craftsman in AZ, and Ingersol-Rand in BC), but I found that it works BEST if you do it just after your compressor has re-filled itself, so it's at FULL PRESSURE.

The other one...? I rode it to a local shop where they loosened it for 12 beer (local, craft beer - YUMMY!), then I re-torqued it there, rode it home and easily removed it.
I hope they do change the front sprocket. I have a little trick, I always ask for the old parts back, I tell them in advance that I don't want them to through away the old parts that came off the bike. Plus luckily the front sprocket cover is easy to take off and check if it the sprocket was replaced. But thanks for the heads up, ill keep it in mind when picking the bike up.
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post #11 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 12:53 PM
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Asking for your old parts is a useful trick until the shop hands your back parts from a job that they did (not yours). You could ask for photo documentation but will the "forget" to do it?
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post #12 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 02:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vaulter View Post
I hope they do change the front sprocket. I have a little trick, I always ask for the old parts back, I tell them in advance that I don't want them to through away the old parts that came off the bike. Plus luckily the front sprocket cover is easy to take off and check if it the sprocket was replaced. But thanks for the heads up, ill keep it in mind when picking the bike up.
another good trick ive always used is bust out a paint pen and park all your old parts so you can ID them.

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post #13 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-11-2018, 02:22 PM
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Asking for your old parts is a useful trick until the shop hands your back parts from a job that they did (not yours). You could ask for photo documentation but will the "forget" to do it?
I had a friend take a harley to the dealership that he purchased the bike from, for the 20,000 mile service (which was posted as a $900 job) The biggest part of this service is removing the forks, and replacing the steering bearings. My friend had been told by several people that the dealership actually does't even pull the front end much less change the bearings, although they do charge you for it. My friend called to set an appointment for service and was told by the mechanic to bring the bike in, leave it, and they should have it done within a day or two. When he carried the bike in, he handed the mechanic a disposable camera, and asked him to take pictures of the bike with the front end removed. Without hesitation they escorted my friend out of the dealership and told him to take his business elsewhere. NOTE: my friend now rides an Indian.
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post #14 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-12-2018, 01:55 AM
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Originally Posted by vaulter View Post
the reason I am changing wheel bearing is because I live in NY and ride all year round... even in single digits temperatures. What happens is the salt from the road gets to the bearings and "eats" the metal. Same happened to my chain and sprockets, the salt got inside the O-rings and damaged them. I perform all maintenance myself, and its the first time I am taking the bike to a dealer... The problem is once again the weather. I dont have a garage and servicing the bike in this cold is not worth the $400.
I would have thought that $300 was more reasonable BUT in your circumstances I would have it done. Maybe get a quote from another dealer.

It may be easy enough when you have the gear, a garage and experience - but doing in in the cold back yard? Nope. Do you have a 1/2 inch drive socket set and power bar? An angle grinder? A 4' length of 1 1/2' ID pipe? A main stand? Multiple types of pliers?

The first time it is a dirty, greasy, knuckle busting job.

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post #15 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-12-2018, 07:30 AM
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Wheel bearings are easy to check if you remove the wheels. Clean any accumulated grease and grime. A bad bearing can be felt by hand. They should turn smoothly with no lateral play. A rough bearing will be obvious. Can be checked to a lesser degree with a wheel on the bike if you have bike stands. Remove the brake calliper (there is always some pad drag) and the chain. Spin the wheel by hand. Listen for any grinding, clicking sounds and also try to move the wheel laterally. I do both of these checks at every tire change.

The only bikes I had to change bearings on were a Concours 1000 (front wheel) and old Brit bikes. Easy to change. But I understand your reluctance to DIY in winter without a heated facility to work in.
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post #16 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-12-2018, 07:31 AM
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Replacing chain and both sprockets should take 1 hour for a person like you or me. A professional mechanic can do it in a lot less time. This is especially true when you consider the rear wheel will need to be removed any way to replace bearings. Replacing sprockets and chain is a 2 out of five on the difficulty scale. Bearings are not much harder if you watch the how to video on YouTube. I would suggest watching how to videos on You Tube, downloading the service manual and doing it yourself and saving $400 dollars in labor.
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post #17 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-12-2018, 09:20 AM
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If they are using quality parts I'd say $400 is about right. Shop labor isn't cheap and quality parts aren't either.

You might do a little better buying online and taking it to an independent shop.

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