2010 Vincent Black Shadow, sorta... - Kawasaki Versys Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-27-2011, 03:35 PM Thread Starter
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2010 Vincent Black Shadow, sorta...

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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-27-2011, 09:00 PM
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LOL Good one!
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-28-2011, 03:37 AM
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gear change is on the wrong side...otherwise perfect
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-28-2011, 07:42 AM
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Ah, nostalgia. Love it. In addition to what Dav says about the gear shift being on the wrong side, it doesn't have Lucas electrics - thankfully!

My '75 850 Norton Commando Interstate - which I dearly loved - was equipped with a Lucas 12 volt positive ground electrical system. I never did come to peaceful terms with that part of the machine. Still, it ran like stink and never let me down - and it was beautiful. One year, it took me from southern Germany, across Belgium, and England to the Isle of Man, and return without skipping a beat. Thank you Norton.

I wonder how many people will really think yours is a Vincent. If anyone does, you can tell them its worth something like half a million dollars, so hands off!

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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-28-2011, 09:33 PM
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Ah yes, Lucas Electrics. I remember them well...

On my '70 Norton Commando: 65 MPH – middle of the night on a winding unlit road – went for the high beam... the switch came apart in my hand and everything got very, VERY DARK!

God I loved that bike!
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-28-2011, 11:04 PM
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Vincents.... When I got into motorcycling my older brother had a Rapide, a friend, Art, had a Black Shadow, while another, Denis had THE Vincent that had been featured in the first North American magazine articles (I'm not sure - a Prince...?), and sold it to a collector in Seattle MANY years ago for $31,000US (when that was REAL money!!!).

While I never got to ride one, I did do several LONG rides w/ Art, and his bike ran like a top, while MY '62 Bonneville had the alternator come apart near the Great Coulee Dam (can we say - Lucas?).

I have great memories of admiring the engine in my brother's Rapide, and always thought that having both pipes exit forward looked way better than the H-D method (excluding the flat-track 750s, of course).

BTW, Denis made a Manx Norton into a legal street-bike a few years back.

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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-29-2011, 04:41 AM
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I had a supposedly 71 commando 750 with combat cams and tls front...went like stink in a straight line...and especially smelly around corners (highside with shot isolastics)
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-29-2011, 09:26 AM
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I had a supposedly 71 commando 750 ...
... and especially smelly around corners (highside with shot isolastics)
Sounds like you might be saying it was the `same year’ as mine... It was actually a ’70 but the dealer sold it in ’71 as a ’71. I don’t know if it was true or not – but at the time I was told that that was a standard practice by dealers.

That Isolastic suspension was the one thing I really didn’t like about the bike. It handled well enough for what it was (and on those tires) but even when it was shimmed to minimum clearances, little road irregularities would make it sort of wallow in a corner. It stayed up, but it always gave me a bit of a queasy feeling... IMO, they should have mounted the swingarm to the frame & not the engine cradle. Properly shimmed the chain could’ve been kept in good alignment...

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-29-2011, 05:06 PM
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Sounds like you might be saying it was the `same year’ as mine... It was actually a ’70 but the dealer sold it in ’71 as a ’71. I don’t know if it was true or not – but at the time I was told that that was a standard practice by dealers.

That Isolastic suspension was the one thing I really didn’t like about the bike. It handled well enough for what it was (and on those tires) but even when it was shimmed to minimum clearances, little road irregularities would make it sort of wallow in a corner. It stayed up, but it always gave me a bit of a queasy feeling... IMO, they should have mounted the swingarm to the frame & not the engine cradle. Properly shimmed the chain could’ve been kept in good alignment...

.
You probably had shot swingarm bushings. People didn't read their owner's manuals and tried to grease the swingarm instead of using the proper oil. This clogged everything up and the bushings ran dry. I've seen it many times.

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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-30-2011, 08:51 AM
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You probably had shot swingarm bushings...
Nah, the swingarm bushings were fine. The problem was that with the swingarm mounted to the engine cradle – and the cradle mounted to the frame via the Isolastic suspension – the whole engine/cradle/swingarm assembly could flex relative to the frame/forks/front wheel — so it would allow a changing angular difference between the front & rear wheels. It was slight (on mine) and didn’t really impact the cornering ability... but until you got used to it, it felt a little disconcerting.

All in all I think the Featherbed frame was a better design (vibrations be damned).
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post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-30-2011, 03:33 PM
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Nah, the swingarm bushings were fine. The problem was that with the swingarm mounted to the engine cradle – and the cradle mounted to the frame via the Isolastic suspension – the whole engine/cradle/swingarm assembly could flex relative to the frame/forks/front wheel — so it would allow a changing angular difference between the front & rear wheels. It was slight (on mine) and didn’t really impact the cornering ability... but until you got used to it, it felt a little disconcerting.

All in all I think the Featherbed frame was a better design (vibrations be damned).
.
The featherbed was better, but on the road bikes, the swingarm bushings were bonded rubber, and they flexed. Most racers converted the swingarm to tapered roller bearings. I once owned a slimline 810 Dunstall Atlas and a 1953 wideline that was a Daytona team bike from that year.

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