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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-20-2011, 02:43 PM Thread Starter
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just a thought

So, because we have (fingers crossed) two days of no rain here in NE ohio. i was able to ride to work and run some errands after. in between stops i was almost cut off by a "cager" making a left from a side street. (gonna wax a lil introspective here) i had my eye him anticipating the cut off and he did. at the last second he stopped when he spotted me and had to back up. my thoughts on the matter? pissed that people are stupid and happy i took the MSF course. i know that there are a lot of people who are "lurking" on this forum before pulling the trigger on getting a V. no matter what bike you get if you are a new rider and are up in the air about taking a rider course. to me that means you should. what i learned has saved me a lot of pain.
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-20-2011, 03:27 PM
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+1...good reminder.

At one time or another...just about everyone makes driving errors/mistakes...regards of how smart or stupid they are. This is the reason that motorcycle rider training places major importance on reading traffic and riding defensively.

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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-20-2011, 04:21 PM
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Sipde...

Years ago I took a MSF course and this stuck with me SIPDE...Scan,Identify,Predict,Decide,Execute...Als o practice panic stops and or swerving in empty parking lots often ...You go where your eyes go...Counter Steering to flick your bike side to side ...and cover your brakes with fingers and foot to reduce reaction time...I have been riding street and dirt for 40 years , and have 300,000 miles in So-Cal traffic with no accidents or crashes ,touch wood, but I tend to ride faster and more aggresive than traffic so that I can find safe zones to cruze in...The cagers are on the phone or distracted nowadays so heads up on whats coming up behind you also...My daily commute is like a video game with the enemy coming at you from all angles..trying to slam you... It's fun...

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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-20-2011, 04:23 PM
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Hope for the best and always be prepared for the worst. Always keeping your eyes down the road observing the changing conditions and taking action on those changes can keep your butt alive.

I rode 20 years before taking the MSF course when my wife got her permit. I have always been a good rider. The class made me a little better. +1 on the MSF class. I recommend any rider who has not taken the class to do so no matter how long you have been riding.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-20-2011, 05:49 PM
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Hope for the best and always be prepared for the worst. Always keeping your eyes down the road observing the changing conditions and taking action on those changes can keep your butt alive.

I rode 20 years before taking the MSF course when my wife got her permit. I have always been a good rider. The class made me a little better. +1 on the MSF class. I recommend any rider who has not taken the class to do so no matter how long you have been riding.
+1, Kirk. However there are several levels of MSF training. I do a refresher every 4 or 5 years just to keep sharp.

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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-20-2011, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by mminob View Post
Years ago I took a MSF course and this stuck with me SIPDE...Scan,Identify,Predict,Decide,Execute...Als o practice panic stops and or swerving in empty parking lots often ...You go where your eyes go...Counter Steering to flick your bike side to side ...and cover your brakes with fingers and foot to reduce reaction time...I have been riding street and dirt for 40 years , and have 300,000 miles in So-Cal traffic with no accidents or crashes ,touch wood, but I tend to ride faster and more aggresive than traffic so that I can find safe zones to cruze in...The cagers are on the phone or distracted nowadays so heads up on whats coming up behind you also...My daily commute is like a video game with the enemy coming at you from all angles..trying to slam you... It's fun...
It's refreshing to see someone who shares my thoughts and methods. I use the military version called the OODA loop. Observe, Orient, Decide, Act. Riding slightly faster than the traffic gives the rider more control of what happens because he initiates most movements. I call it Assertive Riding. I like it because the mind's always working, doing time/distance calculations and watching for opportunities and problems. Lots of fun once you get good at it.

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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-21-2011, 12:31 PM
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Assertive Riding...

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Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
It's refreshing to see someone who shares my thoughts and methods. I use the military version called the OODA loop. Observe, Orient, Decide, Act. Riding slightly faster than the traffic gives the rider more control of what happens because he initiates most movements. I call it Assertive Riding. I like it because the mind's always working, doing time/distance calculations and watching for opportunities and problems. Lots of fun once you get good at it.
Yes, Assertive riding is key to survival in my opinion...great description Here's another problem that I have...There should be a mandatory ...intensive rider course to complete and pass in order to recieve a motorcycle licence here in USA ...The DMV here in Calif. has a super stupid little test to pass...with no real survival skills included...some other places around the world insist on much more training ...so when the new rider gets his 150 horsepower sport bike ...or whatever...they might not crash and wreck ... like every day here in San Diego traffic...Come on...Please...Watching out for Cops is another skill that comes in handy while riding a little faster than traffic... those paper awards they hand out for speeding are Hundreds of dollars now...Ride Safely My Friends !!!

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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-21-2011, 03:32 PM
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Yes, Assertive riding is key to survival in my opinion...great description Here's another problem that I have...There should be a mandatory ...intensive rider course to complete and pass in order to recieve a motorcycle licence here in USA ...The DMV here in Calif. has a super stupid little test to pass...with no real survival skills included...some other places around the world insist on much more training ...so when the new rider gets his 150 horsepower sport bike ...or whatever...they might not crash and wreck ... like every day here in San Diego traffic...Come on...Please...Watching out for Cops is another skill that comes in handy while riding a little faster than traffic... those paper awards they hand out for speeding are Hundreds of dollars now...Ride Safely My Friends !!!
Here in MI, passing the MSF basic course waives the road test for an endorsement, and most folks do it that way.

The key to not getting a citation is simple - don't attract attention. Keep the disparity in speed small, and make smooth lane changes. Wearing proper gear helps, too. And keep it conservative. The cop's going to notice the guy in red and white roadrace leathers wearing a Valentino Rossi rep helmet and riding a loud red Italian superbike before he sees me.

David Hough's two books titled "Proficient Motorcycling" and "MORE Proficient Motorcycling" are absolute gems. These are the books that every road rider should read and study. I still go back and review them on occasion as a refresher. In it, he mentioned that when writing them, he asked different riders about bad situations they found themselves in. He found that the most experienced high mileage riders almost never had bad experiences. I also find this to be true. My philosophy is that any time I have an incident, I consider it to be my fault, and I will analyze it and make whatever corrections are necessary to prevent it happening again.

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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-21-2011, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
Here in MI, passing the MSF basic course waives the road test for an endorsement, and most folks do it that way.

The key to not getting a citation is simple - don't attract attention. Keep the disparity in speed small, and make smooth lane changes. Wearing proper gear helps, too. And keep it conservative. The cop's going to notice the guy in red and white roadrace leathers wearing a Valentino Rossi rep helmet and riding a loud red Italian superbike before he sees me.

David Hough's two books titled "Proficient Motorcycling" and "MORE Proficient Motorcycling" are absolute gems. These are the books that every road rider should read and study. I still go back and review them on occasion as a refresher. In it, he mentioned that when writing them, he asked different riders about bad situations they found themselves in. He found that the most experienced high mileage riders almost never had bad experiences. I also find this to be true. My philosophy is that any time I have an incident, I consider it to be my fault, and I will analyze it and make whatever corrections are necessary to prevent it happening again.
Well said Sir,and thanks for the heads up on those books...I have heard of them but will enjoy them I'm sure soon...Lately , I have found the value of Supermoto track days every now and then to sharpen the skills that can only be found on a track environment...picture this ...grippy ,winding , mountain road, with a few straights , then hairpin turns, then a dirt road with bumps for a bit, then back on the tarmac with your tires still covered in dirt, really slippery, so lap after lap your slipping around on the brakes and gas ... no cars, no cops , no speed limit... good times. I can highly recommend this to any rider that wants to survive the urban jungle and commuting in traffic... It's really a game of mistakes riding on the streets...and I agree with your mindset that most incidents can be our own fault,and store this information for when the time comes to take action...I have lost a few friends to motorcycle crashes over the years , so I know what is possible...Riding motorcycles is so much more fun than a car or truck in traffic thats gridlocked ,or conjested, because of the freedom to get to where you want to go ...I think that the #1 crash problem on bikes is the left turn cager that does'nt see you , so that could really be bad...Like the original poster of this thread said he saw happen...That could have hurt...

2013 White 650 Versys...Purrs like a kitty cat...
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