Versys x-300 OEM fog lamps - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-26-2017, 09:04 PM Thread Starter
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Versys x-300 OEM fog lamps

Has anybody installed the Kawi oem fog lamps yet? Any feedback on the installation would be greatly appreciated


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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-26-2017, 09:25 PM
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I have installed LED high beam driving lights on my Versys 650. Used an aftermarket (Denali) mount and generic high light output (4000lm/each), narrow beam, motorcycle LED driving lights I purchased on AliExpress. Wired them direct to high beam light circuit so they are activated with high beam switch on handle bar. If the lights are LED, the power draw should be low enough you will have no issues with the increased load on this circuit and will have the advantage of not needing an extra switch.
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-26-2017, 09:35 PM
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For the best quality electrical connection I would suggest solder rather than tap in connectors which are usually problematic. See YouTube videos on how to get a good solder connection. You need to heat the twisted wire connections hot enough to melt solder touching the wires, not the soldering iron, into the wires. Insulate with high quality (professional grade) electrical tape that will not unravel or deteriorate with age or shrink wrap if you have it. If you do opt for tap connectors purchase Posi-Lock connectors and do not use the cheap tap connectors most hardware stores sell as these are notoriously unreliable and produce intermittent connections over time. It's common sense but NEVER solder a live connection, disconnect your POS battery lead, it can fry important parts if your soldering iron is grounded. Don't do any of this without purchasing or owning a cheap digital Volt/Ohm meter so you can do things like confirm polarity.

You may still need to purchase plugs for the lights as I am currently retro fitting plugs on the lights so I can easily remove and disconnect them when removing side fairing panels. Up to this point I have had to use extra long wire leads I then stuff up under the fairing.

You can purchase specialized stuff like this (12v waterproof plugs), 12v relays, fused connector blocks, etc. on eBay/AliExpress cheap in the automotive section.
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Last edited by twowheels; 06-26-2017 at 09:49 PM.
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-27-2017, 10:48 AM Thread Starter
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I like using the factory wiring for electrical accessories if available so I am thinking of purchasing the fog lamps switch from Kawi and using the Kawi fog lamp wiring harness and aftermarket lights which I already have but not installed yet. I already have the Kawi relay for my power socket and you only need one relay for both power socket and fog lamps from what I understand. Not a big fan of the size and price of the Kawi fog lamps...
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-27-2017, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by twowheels View Post
For the best quality electrical connection I would suggest solder rather than tap in connectors which are usually problematic.
May I humbly submit a third option:
https://www.amazon.com/Shrink-Solder.../dp/B01M1032A7

Solder joints are considered suboptimal in a hostile environment like a motorcycle.

https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/...older-or-crimp
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-28-2017, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkmatter View Post
May I humbly submit a third option:
https://www.amazon.com/Shrink-Solder.../dp/B01M1032A7

Solder joints are considered suboptimal in a hostile environment like a motorcycle.

https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/...older-or-crimp
As a former Electronic Technologist I respectfully disagree on the reliability of solder joints. If they are soldered properly and insulated properly they will create no extra resistance and be the most reliable form of connection in the most hostile of environments. The reason they are not used on a motorcycle or car by the factory is labor or the need to disconnect during maintenance. It takes more labor and time to create a solder joint than to use crimps in a high speed production environment. Crimped connections can corrode over time and cause an increase in resistance. Solder joints don't do this. Crimped connections and plugs are always the source of electrical connection issues, solder joints never are, at least when a solder joint is soldered correctly.

When soldering wire twist the wire together, tip to tip and tail to tail, and heat the twisted wire from below with a soldering iron until it gets hot enough to melt the solder, pressed against the wire from above, into the wire. When done fold the soldered part back against the wire and insulate. This will allow the wire to twist and bend without stressing the solder joint. Just dropping molten solder on wire will create a cold solder joint that is brittle and will not conduct current well. Keep the tip of the soldering iron clean and shiny with a damp sponge and emery paper. Ideally use a 30-40 watt soldering iron although a 20 watt will work, it will take more time.

Last edited by twowheels; 06-28-2017 at 10:46 AM.
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-09-2017, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by twowheels View Post
As a former Electronic Technologist I respectfully disagree on the reliability of solder joints. If they are soldered properly and insulated properly they will create no extra resistance and be the most reliable form of connection in the most hostile of environments. The reason they are not used on a motorcycle or car by the factory is labor or the need to disconnect during maintenance. It takes more labor and time to create a solder joint than to use crimps in a high speed production environment. Crimped connections can corrode over time and cause an increase in resistance. Solder joints don't do this. Crimped connections and plugs are always the source of electrical connection issues, solder joints never are, at least when a solder joint is soldered correctly.

When soldering wire twist the wire together, tip to tip and tail to tail, and heat the twisted wire from below with a soldering iron until it gets hot enough to melt the solder, pressed against the wire from above, into the wire. When done fold the soldered part back against the wire and insulate. This will allow the wire to twist and bend without stressing the solder joint. Just dropping molten solder on wire will create a cold solder joint that is brittle and will not conduct current well. Keep the tip of the soldering iron clean and shiny with a damp sponge and emery paper. Ideally use a 30-40 watt soldering iron although a 20 watt will work, it will take more time.
Fair enough, I also prefer to solder but a lot of people just aren't very good at it (e.g. dropping solder from up top creating a cold join) or follow with something stupid like wrapping in electrical tape. A good crimp connector and heatshrink is fairly easy, and effectively bomb proof IME.
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-09-2017, 09:02 PM
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Fair enough, I also prefer to solder but a lot of people just aren't very good at it (e.g. dropping solder from up top creating a cold join) or follow with something stupid like wrapping in electrical tape. A good crimp connector and heatshrink is fairly easy, and effectively bomb proof IME.
Tinning the end of a wire before crimping can make the crimped connection better. Twist the end of the wire and then melt a little solder into it. Then crimp. This can sometimes help fight the effects of corrosion on the exposed wire.
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-25-2017, 02:03 AM
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When I work in automotive back in the days, any rewiring must use heat shrink with solder
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--Versys-X 250--
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-24-2019, 09:50 AM
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Anybody know where I can find an aux light on/off switch to fit the dash insert, which is 1" x 1.75" ? Doeas anyone know if Kawi sells one?

I've tried a couple of aftermarket switches but they're slightly too small.
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post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-24-2019, 12:03 PM
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I just used a regular waterproof automotive ON/OFF switch (you can see it IF you look hard, just to the right of that green light that is RIGHT of the clock display - it's BLACK, so look CLOSELY!) that required about a 3/8" hole.



Here's a BETTER pic from the back-side.

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post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-24-2019, 02:00 PM
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Thanks Fasteddie - I see it! That's a simple solution - cost-effective too, as you pointed out.
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