TPMS High Temp Setting - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-03-2020, 10:48 PM Thread Starter
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TPMS High Temp Setting

I recently installed a TPMS. No problem setting low and high pressure limit settings. My question is what do other forum members recommend for high temp limit settings? A Google search ranged 165-185f generally.
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-04-2020, 12:55 AM
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Originally Posted by mi-kawa View Post
I recently installed a TPMS. No problem setting low and high pressure limit settings. My question is what do other forum members recommend for high temp limit settings? A Google search ranged 165-185f generally.
If you have to have a temperature setting, use 212°f or 100°c. Otherwise, just set a high pressure alarm at around 25 psi above your set pressure.

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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-04-2020, 02:36 AM
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I think I left it at the default (65 C?) and never got anywhere near that, even during spirited riding. You'd need track rubber, tyre warmers and A-group tempos to get that temperature higher,. In fact, I've been using that TPMS on my low-displacement track bike as well, without warmers, running Michelin Power RS+ and couldn't get the temperatures to rise above 45 C even though the rubber did show signs of being properly stressed and warmed. Now I might not be the fastest rider on the track, but if you're riding faster than that on public roads, you need to stop

So, for road use, leave it at wherever it is IMO.

Also, 100 C is a reasonable high temp for track tyres, street rubber will melt at much lower temps.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-04-2020, 07:03 AM
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Refer to your tire manufacture for the correct operating heat range.

https://www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/faq#target12
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-04-2020, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by _Big_Mac_ View Post
I think I left it at the default (65 C?) and never got anywhere near that, even during spirited riding. You'd need track rubber, tyre warmers and A-group tempos to get that temperature higher,. In fact, I've been using that TPMS on my low-displacement track bike as well, without warmers, running Michelin Power RS+ and couldn't get the temperatures to rise above 45 C even though the rubber did show signs of being properly stressed and warmed. Now I might not be the fastest rider on the track, but if you're riding faster than that on public roads, you need to stop



So, for road use, leave it at wherever it is IMO.



Also, 100 C is a reasonable high temp for track tyres, street rubber will melt at much lower temps.
100c is the boiling point of water, and is easily reached with a low tire.

However, the point of tpms sensors is to know if your tires are low, not hot. If they are low enough to boil water, you'll know long before that you have a problem, because the bike will handle badly.

Fire isn't going to be a problem until you wreck and spill fuel on the tires, then somehow get it to light. Lol. I think you'll have other more pressing issues to contend with before that happens.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-04-2020, 12:23 PM
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Also, we don't know what temperature this thing measures, is it air within the wheel or is it influenced by the rim temperature (metal conducts heat, a black wheel can get quite warm), but it definitely isn't the temperature of the rubber, at least not directly. While you can get the rubber up to 100 C when you overheat it, the air inside the wheel will likely stay much cooler since air is a good insulator. You can hold your hand an inch away from a boiling kettle and you won't feel 100 C.

So yeah, temperature is mostly a gimmick, you're interested in pressure.

FWIW the front wheel's temperature tends to stay at ambient despite how warm the rubber gets due to the constant airflow around the wheel. Makes for a good thermometer The rear wheel's temperature gets warmer, likely due to the exhaust and worse airflow, but it isn't indicative of actual tyre temperature.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-04-2020, 03:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Big_Mac_ View Post
Also, we don't know what temperature this thing measures, is it air within the wheel or is it influenced by the rim temperature (metal conducts heat, a black wheel can get quite warm), but it definitely isn't the temperature of the rubber, at least not directly. While you can get the rubber up to 100 C when you overheat it, the air inside the wheel will likely stay much cooler since air is a good insulator. You can hold your hand an inch away from a boiling kettle and you won't feel 100 C.

So yeah, temperature is mostly a gimmick, you're interested in pressure.

FWIW the front wheel's temperature tends to stay at ambient despite how warm the rubber gets due to the constant airflow around the wheel. Makes for a good thermometer The rear wheel's temperature gets warmer, likely due to the exhaust and worse airflow, but it isn't indicative of actual tyre temperature.
High pressure and temperature are ignored by me, previous comments tell me my pressures are good , what I look for and my prime reason for the TPMS, is sudden loss of pressure or low pressure when I start out. I have found my Pilot R5's are really good and don't really lose any air, or if they do, it is insignificant. So a low pressure reading on starting out from home would not get me to put air in the tires, it would get me to return home.Put the bike up on stands and look for a nail or screw. I can't remember how many tires I have replaced with almost new tread. I look at that monitor as a safety device, worth 10 times what I paid for it.

Edit** Sometimes we look back and realize we did something stupid and dangerous. This was on my 2015, running PR 3's , I had a screw in the rear tire and plugged it. I had over 1000 KM on the plugged tire, that particular day I was heading towards Aylmer, I was late and booting it on the 401, I say booting, up around 7300 RPM , I got off on a different exit, wasn't paying attention and thought I made a wrong turn, I crossed the 403 Highway and became more disoriented , so did a U turn that turned out to be gravel road, about 2 KM on gravel I felt the back end go soft. Sure enough a flat tire, I was in a swamp, mosquitoes were sending out smoke signals LUNCH has arrived . So I re-plugged that hole and took all back roads home, at a much slower pace, the minute I got in the door I called my local bike repair that stocks over 500 tires, yes I replaced that PR3 that had probably 5000 or more KM left on it.
I have had flats at 100 + KM/HR , once you are below 70KM/HR the centrifugal force diminishes, the tire wants to travel right or left, with my 2015 and the weight in my cases, I am 100% certain that 401 ride would have been a crash had it happened there ,instead of the gravel where I was under 30 KM/HR.
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Last edited by onewizard; 04-05-2020 at 09:50 AM.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-05-2020, 11:50 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Forum, I will try 195f.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-05-2020, 02:45 PM
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You can try Nitrogen fill to reduce tire operating temperature. anyone with TPMS can actual take the lead and record the difference between Normal compressed air and Nitrogen fill.
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