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  #1  
Old 01-01-2009, 01:40 PM
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Lightbulb Oil FIlters

Check out this article on oil filters...Makes good reading and a lot of surprize stuff. I've always used Purolator Pure 1...Check out why drain back valves are important also...Here da link

http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/Filters.html

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  #2  
Old 01-02-2009, 01:23 PM
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The Pure One PL14612 fits the Vulcan. Does it also fit the Versys? Thanks.
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  #3  
Old 01-02-2009, 02:04 PM
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Yep, it sure does, and so does it's slightly longer brother, the Purolator Pure One PL14610...


If you're interested in compatibility, check this out:

http://www.klr650.net/forums/showthread.php?t=37890





Last edited by Bear on a bicycle; 01-02-2009 at 02:06 PM.
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  #4  
Old 01-02-2009, 04:29 PM
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If you live near a Wal-Mart both of these will fit;
WalMart SuperTech ST6607 2.5"
WalMart SuperTech ST7317 3.25"

I've used about 5 on my V so far, great product and low price under $3.00.

Machog
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  #5  
Old 01-02-2009, 05:23 PM
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OEM oil filter: 20 x 1.5mm threads, 14 psi by-pass valve, anti-drain back valve, 2.3" O.D. gasket, 2.5" height, 2.7" OD. The taller 3.25" long filter fits...

http://www.calsci.com/motorcycleinfo/FilterXRef.html
-See Section [5]

Motorcycle Filters - None are recommended:

* AC Delco PF2135
* Carquest 85358
* FRAM PH6017A
* Honda 15410-MCJ-000
* K&N KN-204, about $13. Metric nut on end for easy removal. (KN-303 is the longer version)
* NAPA Gold 1358
* Purolator ML16817. Imported, not made by Purolator.
* STP SMO 17
* WIX 51358

Recommended filters - All have superior filtering:

-About 2.5 inches long:

* AC Delco PF1237
* Amsoil EaOM103, $14.80
* Purolator Pure One PL14612, about $6.
* Mobil M1-108, about $12. Made by Champion.
* Bosch 3300, about $6. Made by Champion.
* Baldwin B1400
* Emgo 10-82230
* Firestone TF2876
* Hastings LF113
* NAPA Gold 1365
* Purolator L14612
* STP S-02876
* Vesrah SF-4007
* WalMart SuperTech ST6607
* WIX 51365


-About 3.25 inches long:

* Amsoil EaOM103C, $17.00
* Purolator Pure One PL14610, about $6.
* Mobil 1 M1-110, about $10. Made by Champion.
* Bosch 3323, about $6. Made By Champion.
* WalMart SuperTech ST7317, about $2. Made by Champion.


-Automobile Filters, about 3.25 inches long:

* AC Delco PF-2057
* Auto Pro 2356
* Autopride CF240AP
* Baldwin B1402
* Carquest 85356
* Carquest Red B4620
* Casite CF240
* Castrol 7317
* Champion Labs Ph2867
* Defense Filters Dl7317
* Deutsch D-370
* Federated Filters LF240F
* Fram Extended Guard XG7317
* Fram Extra Guard PH7317
* Fram Tough Guard TG7317
* Group 7 V4610
* Group 7 V4620
* Hastings LF240
* Mighty M4612
* Motorcraft Long Life FL-821
* Napa FIL1356
* Napa Gold 1356
* Nippon G6Y0-14-302 A
* Parts Plus PH2867
* Pennzoil PZ-109
* Penske 7317
* Powerflo SL14610
* Powerflo SL14620
* Pro Gauge PGO-4620
* Pro Tec 164
* Promotive PH4610
* Pronto PO3593A
* Purolator L14610
* Service Champ OF-4622
* Shell SH48
* Shell SH529
* Stp S-02867.
* Valvoline VO50
* Warner PH2867
* Wix 51356

http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums...ghlight=filter
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  #6  
Old 01-02-2009, 06:12 PM
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Keep in mind that superior filtration comes at a cost. It's harder to pump oil through a filter that flows more. The standard Purolator filters provide excellent filtration with a low oil pressure drop. The Pure One filters more but the increased filtration lowers oil pressure.

Here is a good read...

CLICK HERE
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  #7  
Old 01-02-2009, 06:55 PM
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This one of those topics that gets alot of discussion,

My 2 cents,

I like K&N Oil filters because they have a 17mm nut on the end (makes it easier to get off and torque on). The number for the V is KN-303.
________
Wendie 99

Last edited by furley; 05-14-2011 at 05:08 PM.
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  #8  
Old 01-09-2009, 02:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hacktracker View Post
Keep in mind that superior filtration comes at a cost. It's harder to pump oil through a filter that flows more. The standard Purolator filters provide excellent filtration with a low oil pressure drop. The Pure One filters more but the increased filtration lowers oil pressure.

Here is a good read...

CLICK HERE
That sounds reasonable in theory but nothing could be further from the truth. The amount of resistance to flow does not depend on the outside case of the filter. It depends on several factors inside the filter. Primarily these would be, the type of filter medium, the surface area of the filter medium and the interior flow design. We have taken apart 100s of filters for inspection and some have more than 3 times the square inches of filter area over others. If the micro holes in the filter medium are the same the one with more filter square inches will flow 3 times the oil doing the same job under the same pressure. I can absolutely state that you usually get what you pay for. $2 filters do not do as good a job as $10 filters but that is not absolutely the case either. Among the best filters we have examined are the Motorcraft (Ford), AC Delco and the Amsoil Ea filters. These filters are well constructed and have lots of quality filter medium in them. The OEM filters are also of high quality and I can't understand why a person would try to save $5 on a filter twice a year to buy crap at Walmart.

As far as a good read goes some of the info in that article is absolute bull. Here is one that is.

"So, the engine is getting oil delivered to the engine at 70psi and at some rate. This oil is the life blood of the engine. It must arrive at the bearing journals with enough pressure to support the spinning shafts so that they do not bump and scar the delicate bearing surfaces and journals. The oil must also be flowing at such a rate that fresh cool oil arrives before the oil in the journals overheats and fails."

The pressure of the oil at no time has anything to do with supporting bearing load. This is not true and is misleading. The bond between the oil molecules themselves is what prevents the bearings from touching. If you think 70 lbs of pressure will support bearing loads on your bike when it is spinning at 10000rpm under full throttle and is producing 68 HP you are very misinformed indeed.

As far as oil is concerned, don't even get me going lol.

Last edited by Thunderbox; 01-09-2009 at 02:39 PM.
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  #9  
Old 01-10-2009, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunderbox View Post
That sounds reasonable in theory but nothing could be further from the truth. The amount of resistance to flow does not depend on the outside case of the filter. It depends on several factors inside the filter. Primarily these would be, the type of filter medium, the surface area of the filter medium and the interior flow design. We have taken apart 100s of filters for inspection and some have more than 3 times the square inches of filter area over others. If the micro holes in the filter medium are the same the one with more filter square inches will flow 3 times the oil doing the same job under the same pressure. I can absolutely state that you usually get what you pay for. $2 filters do not do as good a job as $10 filters but that is not absolutely the case either. Among the best filters we have examined are the Motorcraft (Ford), AC Delco and the Amsoil Ea filters. These filters are well constructed and have lots of quality filter medium in them. The OEM filters are also of high quality and I can't understand why a person would try to save $5 on a filter twice a year to buy crap at Walmart.

As far as a good read goes some of the info in that article is absolute bull. Here is one that is.

"So, the engine is getting oil delivered to the engine at 70psi and at some rate. This oil is the life blood of the engine. It must arrive at the bearing journals with enough pressure to support the spinning shafts so that they do not bump and scar the delicate bearing surfaces and journals. The oil must also be flowing at such a rate that fresh cool oil arrives before the oil in the journals overheats and fails."

The pressure of the oil at no time has anything to do with supporting bearing load. This is not true and is misleading. The bond between the oil molecules themselves is what prevents the bearings from touching. If you think 70 lbs of pressure will support bearing loads on your bike when it is spinning at 10000rpm under full throttle and is producing 68 HP you are very misinformed indeed.

As far as oil is concerned, don't even get me going lol.
I'm sure Hack will have fun with this one but......you're saying in essence that if a motor loses all it's oil pressure you won't see any bearing {or otherwise} damage? Please back up your claim with proof, I for one would love to hear this one.
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  #10  
Old 01-10-2009, 09:00 AM
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Well, I don't think I ever said an oil filter's flow characteristics were governed by the oil filter case; so I don't see how that has any bearing.

I did make a mistake in my first post (the part you quoted). I should have said "It's harder to pump oil through a filter that filters more"

For the most part I stand behind this. I will conceed that filters with very high-quality filter media can do a great job without causing an excessive oil pressure drop.

I have seen data comparing Purolater standard and Pure One filters and the Pure One models offered better filtration but cause a larger oil pressure drop. I don't have the link to the experiement, but it may have been on bobistheoilguy.com, I'm just not sure.

I also think the writer of the experiment my original post linked is prone to hyperbole. I hate phrases like "lifeblood of the engine". Anyway, I'm not sure what oil pressure is seen in crank bearings relative to system oil pressure, I'm not an engine builder. I do think a loss of oil pressure could result in a spun crank bearing very easily, so oil pressure is important.

The bottom line for me, I use OEM filters because it's a no-brainer and not expensive given the number of oil changes I do in a year.
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  #11  
Old 01-10-2009, 10:25 AM
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I think some people get too caught up in this stuff. Change the oil & filter & ride the damned thing. I have yet to read a single incident where a guy used a pure one oil filter instead of an STP filter & it caused engine problems. The problems come from people who don't change their oil. It amazes me how many of these discussions take place, forum after forum. I used to be a member on a computer forum & even they had an 'oil argument' thread.

Simply amazing...


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  #12  
Old 01-10-2009, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bear on a bicycle View Post
I think some people get too caught up in this stuff. Change the oil & filter & ride the damned thing. I have yet to read a single incident where a guy used a pure one oil filter instead of an STP filter & it caused engine problems. The problems come from people who don't change their oil. It amazes me how many of these discussions take place, forum after forum. I used to be a member on a computer forum & even they had an 'oil argument' thread.

Simply amazing...


Couldn't agree with you more. I remember when I had an SL70 Honda when I was 8...I think as long as it HAD OIL IN IT it was ok, let alone change it. I beat the pulp out of that thing for about three years and it never died.....
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Old 01-10-2009, 03:40 PM
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These threads are inevitable.

Too often, inaccurate information becomes “fact” because it gets repeated over and over. I can’t believe how many times I’ve heard somebody say “oh, a mechanic at my shop said never use brand x of product y, it will cause the motor to explode”.

I like Bob Lutz, the Product Czar at GM. When he started on the job, he wore a button with “WHO SAYS” on it.

I’m a data guy and I tend to discount anecdotal evidence as nothing more than opinion. So if somebody posts something that doesn’t quite make sense, I’ll probably be there sooner or later with a “WHO SAYS” post.
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  #14  
Old 01-10-2009, 04:27 PM
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I'll stick with the factory filters.
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Old 01-11-2009, 12:47 AM
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Good, relatively clean oil is important enough. Oil is pushed by the pump through the filter before it can be delivered to where it's needed. Resistance at the filter from little surface area, filtering media resistance and/or contaminant buildup increases oil pressure between pump and filter, as read by oil pressure sensor, or with oil pressure gauge at access port (which also happens to be a good place for an oil temperature gauge's sender), but reduces resulting oil pressure feeding oil through the engine, particularly up to the head... I'm using the longer (~3,25") Nippon filter.

Last edited by invader; 01-11-2009 at 01:22 AM.
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  #16  
Old 01-11-2009, 01:45 AM
Gustavo Gustavo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redline View Post
I'm sure Hack will have fun with this one but......you're saying in essence that if a motor loses all it's oil pressure you won't see any bearing {or otherwise} damage? Please back up your claim with proof, I for one would love to hear this one.
I am not Thunderbox, I don't even play him on the internet, but...

If I read his post correctly, he was saying that what keeps those precious metal parts from making contact is not oil pressure, rather the oil itself. This is correct, you don't need pressure to prevent wear. Oil is squeezed from between the different components and finds it's way to the low point in the engine (usually a sump), where it will remain unless your pump can recirculate it through the filter and back to where it's needed. You need the right pressure to assure oil gets to all the components it needs to lubricate.

Gustavo

Last edited by Gustavo; 01-11-2009 at 01:52 AM.
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Old 01-11-2009, 06:16 AM
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At the risk of fanning the flames, I just want to point
out that if you put 90W gear oil in your engine you
would have tremendous pressure. (For a very short
period of time.) But little or no flow. Not contradicting
or criticizing anything that's been said, only pointing out
that many times folks mistake pressure as the ultimate
measure of engine oil function. The flow of fresh oil of
the proper weight is what keeps the metals apart.

Despite the continuous controversy involved, I never
mind reading these opinion wars because I always learn
something. It's just unfortunate that non-mechanical
types can be mislead or confused by the 'evidence'
presented.

For them, the lesson is keep it full, pay the money
for quality oil and filters and change it regularly.
Then, after documenting it (especially if under
warranty) go ride!

For us technical nerds, thanks to all for another
refreshing and informative chapter in the continuing
saga of "The Oil Wars" It's all pretty slick!

Last edited by AvaChava; 01-11-2009 at 06:18 AM.
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Old 01-11-2009, 08:12 AM
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Quote: If I read his post correctly, he was saying that what keeps those precious metal parts from making contact is not oil pressure, rather the oil itself. This is correct, you don't need pressure to prevent wear. Oil is squeezed from between the different components and finds it's way to the low point in the engine (usually a sump), where it will remain unless your pump can recirculate it through the filter and back to where it's needed. You need the right pressure to assure oil gets to all the components it needs to lubricate.

I re-read the post as well and you're right, I guess you could interpret it a couple of ways. But....., pressure, flow, volume, and oil viscosity {to a lesser degree}are all needed to work in concert {especially} in a plain bearing motor.
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Old 01-12-2009, 08:19 AM
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Interesting side note: The engine in the Wright Brothers
Flyer, which made it's first flights in NC, did not have an
oil pump! I saw an interview with the little guy who built
their engine. He machined a crank out of a solid piece of
steel, poured babbit bearings, squirted on a little oil and
off they flew into the history books! When it locked up he
pulled it back apart and relubricated everything so it would
run some more...

Oh, and their entire first flight could have taken place
inside the C5-A Galaxy. My, how things have changed.
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Old 01-12-2009, 08:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AvaChava View Post
Interesting side note: The engine in the Wright Brothers
Flyer, which made it's first flights in NC, did not have an
oil pump! I saw an interview with the little guy who built
their engine. He machined a crank out of a solid piece of
steel, poured babbit bearings, squirted on a little oil and
off they flew into the history books! When it locked up he
pulled it back apart and relubricated everything so it would
run some more...

Oh, and their entire first flight could have taken place
inside the C5-A Galaxy. My, how things have changed.
Now that I didn't know! Maybe thats why the one Wright brother was the first fatality of an airplane crash in the world. Bad engine design.
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