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  #41  
Old 12-13-2012, 07:52 AM
trialsguy trialsguy is offline
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Originally Posted by BLACK DOG View Post
I'm probaly off kilter because I'm 20 miles from my bike...but.
I THINK that the chain is at the tightest point of the swing arm travel cycle when on the stand
(relative the the three cls involved) so that when the arm goes above or below that point the slack would increase slightly rather than get tighter.
Just my guess based on a failing memory set

steve
Not true. The chain is at its tightest point when the countershaft, the swing-arm pivot and the rear axel are all in alignment. That's why the manual recommends the amount of slack that it does, when the bike is on its sidestand. It's so the chain will still have some slack when the rear suspension is compressed.
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  #42  
Old 12-13-2012, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by trialsguy View Post
Not true. The chain is at its tightest point when the countershaft, the swing-arm pivot and the rear axel are all in alignment. That's why the manual recommends the amount of slack that it does, when the bike is on its sidestand. It's so the chain will still have some slack when the rear suspension is compressed.
the tightest point would be at the point where all three centerlines (counter shaft, arm pivot, & rear sprocket) are in a straight line with each other.
above & below that point the rear sprocket gets closer to the counter shaft.
since it's a pita to achieve the straight line situation you have to pick a point and come up with a number. the real world has little concern for ideal situations, especially mine
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  #43  
Old 12-13-2012, 12:05 PM
trialsguy trialsguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BLACK DOG View Post
the tightest point would be at the point where all three centerlines (counter shaft, arm pivot, & rear sprocket) are in a straight line with each other.
above & below that point the rear sprocket gets closer to the counter shaft.
since it's a pita to achieve the straight line situation you have to pick a point and come up with a number. the real world has little concern for ideal situations, especially mine
Ha! How true, and how true. That's a concept that I still rail sometimes against, to my detriment. ...
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  #44  
Old 12-13-2012, 01:46 PM
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fasteddiecopeman fasteddiecopeman is offline
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Originally Posted by samill2 View Post
So, if suspension flex changes the chain tightness, and rider weight affect suspension flex, how does suspension sag not affect the chain slack? Help me understand.
Once your chain-slack is set, and everything tightened up, the slack will change from what you've set, EITHER by adding weight to the bike (YOU!), or by rear wheel suspension travel - LOOSE, TIGHTEST, LOOSE - as it is unloaded-on-the-stand; the 3 centers inline; and rear shock fully compressed. Hope I explained that clearly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BLACK DOG View Post
I'm probaly off kilter because I'm 20 miles from my bike...but.
I THINK that the chain is at the tightest point of the swing arm travel cycle when on the stand
(relative the the three cls involved) so that when the arm goes above or below that point the slack would increase slightly rather than get tighter.
Just my guess based on a failing memory set

steve
NOPE.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BLACK DOG View Post
the tightest point would be at the point where all three centerlines (counter shaft, arm pivot, & rear sprocket) are in a straight line with each other.
above & below that point the rear sprocket gets closer to the counter shaft.
since it's a pita to achieve the straight line situation you have to pick a point and come up with a number. the real world has little concern for ideal situations, especially mine
CORRECT!
If you feel the need to REALLY understand this, find a way to remove the rear shock (obviously you'll need to support your Versys!), and then, using a tie-down or something similar, ratchet the swingarm UP till the THREE centers (countershaft, swingarm pivot, and rear axle) are ALL inline. At this point adjust your chain till it's tight but not overly tight.

Now let the swingarm DOWN till the distance between the shock-mounting bolt holes equals the length of your shock and MEASURE the slack again.

Now ratchet the swingarm UP till that distance equals the fully COMPRESSED length of your shock, and again MEASURE the slack.

The figure you will end up with will be SLIGHTLY less than the 1" figure Ma Kawasaki gave us as chain-slack at the tight end, and what I've detailed is the method by which she came up with... 1 to 1.4" slack.

The movement of the chain and sprockets, over that arc, is the ONLY thing that changes your chain-slack (unless you are SO HEAVY that your weight bends the frame or swingarm..., and in THAT case you'd be WAY-Y-Y over the max. weight allowed)!

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  #45  
Old 12-13-2012, 03:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fasteddiecopeman View Post
Once your chain-slack is set, and everything tightened up, the slack will change from what you've set, EITHER by adding weight to the bike (YOU!), or by rear wheel suspension travel - LOOSE, TIGHTEST, LOOSE - as it is unloaded-on-the-stand; the 3 centers inline; and rear shock fully compressed. Hope I explained that clearly.



NOPE.



CORRECT!
If you feel the need to REALLY understand this, find a way to remove the rear shock (obviously you'll need to support your Versys!), and then, using a tie-down or something similar, ratchet the swingarm UP till the THREE centers (countershaft, swingarm pivot, and rear axle) are ALL inline. At this point adjust your chain till it's tight but not overly tight.

Now let the swingarm DOWN till the distance between the shock-mounting bolt holes equals the length of your shock and MEASURE the slack again.

Now ratchet the swingarm UP till that distance equals the fully COMPRESSED length of your shock, and again MEASURE the slack.

The figure you will end up with will be SLIGHTLY less than the 1" figure Ma Kawasaki gave us as chain-slack at the tight end, and what I've detailed is the method by which she came up with... 1 to 1.4" slack.

The movement of the chain and sprockets, over that arc, is the ONLY thing that changes your chain-slack (unless you are SO HEAVY that your weight bends the frame or swingarm..., and in THAT case you'd be WAY-Y-Y over the max. weight allowed)!

If I ever get to the point that I need to understand this, I hope someone pokes me with a stick. I have no problem taking SOME things on faith
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  #46  
Old 02-12-2015, 06:59 PM
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Default Whirr sounds with new DID gold (outsides) Stock Pro chain & Sunstar oem sprockets

From reading this it looks like he did not adjust the full 1.4 inches at the tightest spot. It was not greased throughly either.

When him and the manager came and told me it wasn't a continuous chain link, I asked him if he knew what direction to put the link in. So he may have gotten an attitude and sabotaged my adjustment too tight.

I hope riding it 50 miles did not screw my gd chain up. I wish I had my centerstand already put on, but I'll be back at motohelmets tomorrow! $70 labor seemed like a good deal in need, but not that good of a deal I guess.
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  #47  
Old 02-13-2015, 10:14 PM
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Motohelmets helped me out and loosened my chain after they had me sit on it while readjusting, and said they would adjust my chain again later when it breaks in. It may be a hair loose now, but it is not 'whirring': which meant it could have eat up my completely new drive train.

I'm going to get them to put on my HB crashbars and centerstand: since they are an integrated assembly and I can't work on mine (efficiently) until i get my centerstand. Moto helmets does have a $30 new tire install (ON the bike!), and I always make them use Rocky Mountain ATV tires so I know I also have the low National price and fresh tire rubber since they are so cheap. If you live near Fullerton, CA, they are the Tire discount service for motorcycle riders :-)

Last edited by kawdog; 02-13-2015 at 10:17 PM.
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  #48  
Old 02-13-2015, 11:30 PM
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weljo2001 weljo2001 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kawdog View Post
Motohelmets helped me out and loosened my chain after they had me sit on it while readjusting, and said they would adjust my chain again later when it breaks in. It may be a hair loose now, but it is not 'whirring': which meant it could have eat up my completely new drive train.

I'm going to get them to put on my HB crashbars and centerstand: since they are an integrated assembly and I can't work on mine (efficiently) until i get my centerstand. Moto helmets does have a $30 new tire install (ON the bike!), and I always make them use Rocky Mountain ATV tires so I know I also have the low National price and fresh tire rubber since they are so cheap. If you live near Fullerton, CA, they are the Tire discount service for motorcycle riders :-)


These guys have done great work for me and quite a few other guys i ride with......http://www.fivestarmotorcycles.com
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